IKEA x HAY Ypperlig Collection

IKEA has teamed up with cult Danish design brand HAY to launch 'Ypperlig', a new collection of beautiful basics

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

When Swedish mega-brand IKEA hooked up with cult Danish design duo HAY to create a new range, we knew the results would be impressive. This week the 'Ypperlig' collection hits global stores, celebrating the beauty of basics, Scandinavian functionality and streamlined, contemporary style. Fittingly, the name means 'extraordinary'.

Inspired by architecture, art and fashion trends, design brand HAY was founded in Copenhagen in 2002, and is helmed by husband-and-wife team Rolf and Mette Hay. Using sophisticated industrial manufacturing processes, the pair design pieces for modern living, with a less-is-more aesthetic that chimes well with fellow Scandinavian homewares giant IKEA. The collaborative collection spans furniture – from a compact sofa and comfy sofa-bed to tables, a bench and decorative wall shelf – super-slim lighting and covetable accessories.

ABOVE: Featuring clean lines, muted colours and Scandi materials, the new 'Ypperlig' collection by IKEA x HAY is in stores now
ABOVE RIGHT: HAY co-founders Rolf and Mette Hay
BELOW: 'Ypperlig' ash table, £150, with vases in green, £12, and brown, £18; Indoor/outdoor 'Ypperlig' chair with armrests, in green and light grey, £40 each; 'Ypperlig' chair with armrests, with dining table and vases, as before

ABOVE: Light grey three-seat 'Ypperlig' sofa-bed, £550, constructed like a pocket-sprung mattress, with cushion covers, £5 each; 'Ypperlig' coffee tables, £35 each, with green vase, £12; Light grey 'Ypperlig' LED table lamp, £35, with built-in variable touch dimmer

Top FizzPicks include the sinuous, indoor/outdoor 'Ypperlig' armchair and chair (moulded in one piece in on-trend green or light grey); the minimal LED table light and floor lamp; three jaunty wall mirrors; a sleek ash dining table and grey-topped birch coffee table; and our favourite design, the curvy 'Ypperlig' vase in a choice of two three-tone colourways (green, blue and grey or brown, yellow and white). A trio of pretty-hued boxes with lids make savvy storage for small items, or for cute gifts check out the graphic candle holder and stationery set. Vibrant cushion covers and throws bring a softer touch (in block colours, with pared-back pattern), and HAY has even reinvented the iconic IKEA bag, updating the weaving patterns and colours. 

ABOVE: 'Ypperlig' candle holders, £3 each; 'Ypperlig' wall mirrors, in white, £20, dark red, £12, and green, £15, suitable for use in bathrooms; 'Ypperlig' cushion covers, £5 each, available in nine reversible colourways with varying patterns, beech stools, £20 each

The duo intended the collaboration to be true to IKEA, with honest, substantial products at an affordable price that would be around for a long time. 'We wanted to do something that was beautiful, well-made and usable,' says Mette Hay. 'Really good products made by IKEA and sprinkled with a bit of HAY'. Get in quick and make HAY while the sun shines!
ikea.com 

The 'Ypperlig' collection is available in selected IKEA stores and online (see regional sites for local prices).

IKEA Viktigt collection

Celebrating craft and natural materials, IKEA’s new 'Viktigt' collection is on our wish list…

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

We’ve long been fans of Ingegerd Råman, the renowned Swedish glassware and ceramics designer known for her minimal aesthetic. So imagine our delight at this April’s Milan Furniture Fair, when we discovered Råman had collaborated with IKEA to create ‘Viktigt’, a limited edition collection for the home, including understated furniture, lighting, storage and tableware.

ABOVE TOP: Ingegerd Råman with her subtle 'Viktigt' range for IKEA
ABOVE: Compact, light 'Viktigt' furniture includes a bamboo and woven paper-cord chair, £45; easy chair, £95, with woven paper-cord seat and backrest; and natural fibre sofa, £145, and armchair, £95

Launched in a verdant Tortona roof terrace apartment, ‘Viktigt’ (which means ‘Important’ in Swedish) celebrates craft and the handmade, with tactile, simple pieces created from rattan, seagrass, water hyacinth and bamboo. The range also features subtle glass and stoneware pieces, including a water carafe, jugs, bowls and plates, as well as a compact sofa, chairs and stools, pendant lamps, planters, rugs and baskets.

Råman worked with IKEA designers Nike Karlsson and Wiebke Braasch, and drew on the skills of artisan craftspeople in Poland, Indonesia and Vietnam. ‘The collection is about craft. It’s a project between the craftsmen and the designer. It has lots of energy and, for me, it represents love.’ Harnessing craft techniques from mouth-blown glass to hand-woven rattan, many pieces are unique, breaking away from Ikea’s usual sleek standardisation.

ABOVE: Renewable chic: 'Viktigt' water hyacinth hanging planter (set of two), £18; bamboo dish, available in two sizes, £9 and £12; and bamboo pendant lamp shade, also in two sizes, £20 and £30

Less is more in Råman’s book, and the collection is defined by its poetic but pared back functionality. ‘I take away, then take away some more,’ she says. Her glass jugs, for instance, are streamlined, with sculptural spouts but no handles. ‘Handles are simply non-essential.’ Pieces are designed to be ergonomic, but also to look good when on display. ‘When you’re not using the serving plates they are as beautiful just stacked together,’ says Råman.  Her palette is equally restrained, with signature clear, white and tricky-to-create black glass (the latter produced with help from expert European craftsmen).`

Always aware of touch and feel, she’s also passionate about everyday rituals. ‘Just pouring fresh water into a clear glass is in fact extraordinarily spectacular. The love of food is the basis of my interest in usable things – objects you use every day. For me every day is equally important,’ she says – so forget saving that gorgeous tableware ‘for best’!

ABOVE: Tactile 'Viktigt' tableware, including glazed black stoneware serving plates, £6.50 for a set of four, £13.25 for larger set of three; glass carafe with glass, £9.75; white serving plates, as before; clear glass jug, £6.25, bowl, £11.25 for a set of two, and bowl, £9.50 for two-pack, carafe, as before; renewable water hyacinth basket, in two sizes, £15 and £19

Some of the challenges of the natural materials proved to be an inspiration, as with the water hyacinth storage baskets. ‘I found the heavy brown fibre difficult to work with. However, resistance can be an advantage,’ recalls Råman. ‘The result was two large, patterned baskets in black and light brown, which became my favourites.’ Råman also encourages users to create patterns across various pieces, such as the reversible, black-striped seagrass rugs, which can be used in diverse combinations. ‘It’s a rhythm I’ve tried to capture.’

ABOVE: 'Viktigt's covetable craft pieces span black and clear glass; renewable seagrass flatwoven rug, £25

IKEA has just launched a book about the life and work of Ingegerd Råman, and an exhibition of her work is on show at Stockholm's Nationalmuseum this summer. ‘Viktigt’ continues the trend for quiet, low-key, natural craft-led pieces, embraced by designer Ilse Crawford in IKEA’s earlier ‘Sinnerlig’ collection, which we flagged up in our Spotlight section in May 2015. Think the opposite of built-in obsolescence. ‘I want to make objects that can live a long time without feeling out of date,’ says Råman. Now that is important…
ikea.com

Ikea’s ‘Viktigt’ collection launched in May 2016 and will be in global stores for a limited run of around three months. Exhibition 'Ingegerd Råman' is at Sweden's Nationalmuseum until 14 August 2016 at Kulturhuset Stadsteatern, Sergels Torg, Stockholm, before transferring to Vandalorum art museum, Skulpturvågen 2, Vårnamo from 3 September to 27 November 2016

Siemens Home Connect

Step into hi-tech heaven as Siemens bring the smart kitchen to the home. Beam me up Scotty...

BY DEE IVA

It looks like the fully automated world of Sixties cartoon family The Jetsons is finally here. There’s an app for virtually everything these days and the kitchen is no exception. German company Siemens has long been known for its sleek design-led kitchen appliances, but now it has upped the ante with its new 'iQ700' range of WiFi-controlled ovens, fridges, washing machines, dishwashers and coffee machines.

The 'Home Connect App' is at the heart of this clever system. It allows you to switch on and preheat your oven, change cooking programmes or get recipes sent to your smartphone wherever you are. If you thought CCTV had gone too far, then think again. Siemens’ newest WiFi-controlled fridges have two internal cameras monitoring the inside of your fridge so if you can’t remember whether you’ve run out of milk or not you can check in on your way home. Connected dishwashers and washing machines can also be programmed from afar. 

ABOVE RIGHT: The 'Home Connect App' puts control in the palm of your hand
BELOW: Simple, visually clear touch-control panels on the 'iQ700' range of ovens

You might think this is all well and good for extremely forgetful people and that you’ll never need it, but whenever technology jumps forward it tends to drag us with it. When Apple launched the first iPad we remember thinking that if you had a phone, a laptop and an iPod why would you need an iPad? Now we can’t do without it. The 'iQ700' range boasts a plethora of labour-saving features like activeClean cleaning programmes, steam and 4D hotAir cooking, stain removal and automatic dosing systems, and its fuss-free minimal design makes it the smartest ‘smart’ kitchen around at a reasonable price. Welcome to the second Industrial Revolution...
siemens-home.com

BELOW: The 'iQ700 HN878G4S6B' built-in oven with microwave, pulseSteam function, activeClean and Home Connect features

The 'iQ700' range is available now from selected Siemens dealers. Go to siemens-home.com for your nearest outlet

Osloform

Norwegian design studio Osloform's new 'Serpentine' stereo is easy on the eye, as well as the ear for switched-on music lovers...

BY DEE IVA

Osloform's minimal 'Serpentine' stereo is simply one of the most beautiful we’ve ever seen. Comprised of two speakers and an amplifier, this sleek system is encased in luscious green or grey Valchromat (wood-fibre panels impregnated with dye and resin) with a sexy central brass volume control and perforated brass speaker covers. But its beauty is not only skin deep. Underneath the glamorous exterior the compact amplifier by high-end hi-fi boffins Bang & Olufsen easily fills the room with natural pure sound and a preamplifier with buffered line inputs allows you to connect your phone, tablet or computer. Wireless streaming is possible with the addition of Apple TV or Google Chromecast devices.

BELOW: Easy on the ear, a joy to behold: the 'Serpentine' stereo by Osloform, NOK 28,000

'Serpentine''s designers were inspired by minimalism, usability and tactile contrasts, striving to 'cultivate the essence of a stereo as both hi-fi and furniture object' (for more on the trend for technology integrated with furniture see the Bouroullec brothers' 'Serif' TV and IKEA's wireless charging lamps and tables).

ABOVE: Plug in, tune in and zone out; it's all about being well connected

It’s not what you’d expect to see in your local audio store and there’s a good reason for that. Launched in 2015, Osloform is a new Oslo-based design studio made up of four young Norwegian designers. Camilla Akersveen, Åsmund Engesland, Christopher Konings and Henrik Waarum are on a mission to bring modern Norwegian design to our attention and judging by their inaugural 'Brass & Valchromat' collection they’re definitely on the right track. Due to exhibit at the Milan Furniture Fair in April 2016, we reckon they’ll be one of the highlights of the Salone.
osloform.no

Photos: Istvan Virag  istvanvirag.com

Rolfe & Wills

Bristol duo Rolfe & Wills is putting graphic pattern into tableware. Only black and white aficionados need apply!

BY DEE IVA

With the bizarre trend for adult colouring books going from strength to strength, we’re relieved to see that a sense of decorum has been restored at Rolfe & Wills. You just can’t go wrong with black and white and the absence of colour in these monochromatic designs by Alice Rolfe and Chloe Wills focuses the eye on the rhythmic patterns made by the simple, almost austere use of grids and dots. Four designs – ‘Dotty’, ‘Grid, ‘Chevron’ and ‘Triangle’ – have been applied to pure white bone china mugs, organic cotton tea towels, placemats and coasters to create chic, contemporary tableware with understated style.

Hand screen-printed in Bristol in the UK, these black and white babies are modern classics that we’ll never tire of and have absolutely no desire to colour in…
rolfeandwills.com

ABOVE: 'Chevron' bone china mug, £12, organic cotton tea towel, £12, and hardboard coaster, £4
ABOVE RIGHT: 'Dotty' mug and tea towel, £12 each, coaster, £4
BELOW FROM LEFT: 'Triangle' mug and tea towel, £12 each, coaster, £4; 'Grid' mug and tea towel, £12 each, coaster, £4