David Hockney: Current

'David Hockney: Current' taps into the so-now iPad and iPhone art of Britain's greatest living artist

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

World-premiere exhibition 'David Hockney: Current' at Melbourne's National Gallery of Victoria is turning heads not just for the iconic English artist's trademark colourful portraits and paintings of interiors and nature, but also for his more recent tech-driven art.

A major solo show dedicated to this still-influential 79-year-old artist, running until 13 March 2017, it features more than 1,200 works from the last decade of Hockney's career, including paintings, photography, digital drawings and video art. Among them are significant new pieces, such as immersive room installation '4 blue stools', a digitally constructed image (or 'photographic drawing') of Hockney's Hollywood Hills studio presented as floor-to-ceiling wallpaper with custom-created stools and chairs. Also striking is the 60-metre long hall housing recent oeuvre '82 portraits and 1 still life', painted over several years and incorporating portraits of entertainer Barry Humphries, architect Frank Gehry and designer Celia Birtwell.

ABOVE: David Hockney inside the world-premiere exhibition 'David Hockney: Current' at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne
BELOW: '4 blue stools' 2014, photographic drawing printed on paper, mounted on Dibond, edition 5 of 25; installation view, including iPad drawing 'Yosemite I', October 16th 2011 (1059); installation view

ABOVE: Installation views of 'David Hockney: Current' at the NGV International, Melbourne

Think Hockney and you probably imagine paintings of sun-kissed swimming pools or primary-hued furniture dotted around LA living rooms – in Vuk Vidor's witty print listing artists' attributes, he states 'Hockney owns California'. More recently in 2004, Bradford-born Hockney returned to his native Yorkshire, capturing its vibrant countryside and changing seasons.

But it's his foray into new-tech digital art that's most arresting here, including works crafted on iPads and iPhones. Over 600 iPad works – some animated – span self-portraits, still lifes (from flowers to tea pots, slippers and chargers) and large-scale landscapes of Yorkshire and Yosemite National Park. They're presented both on screens and as monumental prints, some almost four metres tall, alongside a recent video work focussed on Hockney's iPad drawing practice.

ABOVE: 'Self-portrait', 25 March 2012, No. 3 (1236), iPad drawing; 'Untitled', 91 2009, iPhone drawing; 'Untitled', 655 2011, iPad drawing

This is the first show to focus on Hockney's captivating iPad and iPhone works, proof of his constant experimentation. In the past he has made art using Polaroid photos, colour photocopiers, fax machines, computers, and high-definition multi-screen videos, so he's always been an early adopter. Every suit Hockney owns sports a large pocket, once used to hold a sketchbook, but now containing his go-to iPad. 'I've been able to practise the iPad a lot in the last few years... and I've really loved mastering it,' he says.

BELOW: Installation view of 'David Hockney: Current' at the NGV International; 'The Arrival of spring in Woldgate, East Yorkshire in 2011 (twenty eleven)' – 31 May, No. 1 (900), and 2 January (1147), iPad drawings printed on six sheets of paper mounted on Dibond

BELOW: 'Bigger trees near Warter or/ou Peinture sur le motif pour le nouvel age post-photographique' 2007, oil on 50 canvases

Hockney was quick to embrace this emerging design technology, getting the brushes out straight away and enjoying the method of drawing on the screen. 'You're drawing on a sheet of glass, really, and you can't really overdraw, which you can on a piece of paper.' The digital canvas is endlessly expandable though, allowing Hockney to zoom in to add more detail or zoom back out to view the whole composition. He credits this digital innovation with reviving the fading art of drawing, confessing, 'I was amazed that it was the telephone which can bring back drawing. I thought that was very funny!'
ngv.vic.gov.au

'David Hockney: Current' is at the NGV International, 180 St Kilda Road, Melbourne until 13 March 2017. UK fans can also catch major retrospective 'David Hockney' at Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1 until 29 May 2017

Photos: Wayne Taylor (portrait); Richard Schmidt

Five Must-Sees at Melbourne's NGV

In the mood for a culture hit? We share five FizzPicks from Melbourne's National Gallery of Victoria, including fashion, architecture and art...

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Melbourne's National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) has a flock of fascinating shows and installations on this season, from radical fashion to architecture, design and art. We share five of the best current must-sees below. For future diary dates, make plans to catch US photography exhibition 'William Eggleston Portraits' (17 March-18 June 2017) and major draw 'The House of Dior: Seventy Years of Haute Couture' (27 August-7 November 2017).
ngv.vic.gov.au

ABOVE: Australian Islamic Centre, Newport, Melbourne, by Glenn Murcutt


VIKTOR&ROLF: Fashion Artists
Until 26 February 2017
Radical Dutch fashion duo Viktor&Rolf's surreal creations get their first Australian airing in 'Viktor&Rolf: Fashion Artists'. Exploring their love affair with wearable art, the exhibition includes more than 40 haute couture and ready-to-wear looks, many verging on the sculptural with 3D details. Dollphobics look away, as there are also 21 handmade Belgian dolls sporting ensembles. A video gallery of runway footage brings the pair's performance-art-inspired catwalk shows to life. Children will love separate interactive installation 'Atelier: Viktor&Rolf For Kids'.

ABOVE: Chromogenic print Heather Marks by David LaChapelle, 'The House at the End of the World', 2015, featuring Viktor&Rolf 'Bedtime Story RTW collection A/W 2005, published in Vogue Italia, October 2015; Viktor&Rolf 'Wearable Art' haute couture collection, A/W 2015-16


GLEN MURCUTT: Architecture of Faith
Until 19 February 2017
Known for his environmentally conscious, locally sensitive designs, Glenn Murcutt turned 80 recently, but this hugely influential Australian architect is still making waves. NGV exhibition 'Glenn Murcutt: Architecture of Faith' delves into one of his most inspiring recent projects, the new Australian Islamic Centre at Newport, Melbourne, created with practice Elevli Plus. Defining a new language for contemporary Australian Islam, the building respects traditional mosque architecture while bravely pushing the boundaries in terms of geometry, colour and materials.

ABOVE: Australian Islamic Centre, detail of minaret wall; Elevated roof detail showing lantern layout, Australian Islamic Centre, Newport, 2016, designed by Glenn Murcutt AO in collaboration with Elevli Plus


2016 NGV ARCHITECTURE COMMISSION: M@Studio Architects
Until April 2017
We told you pink was trending! This playful pink reimagining of a suburban car wash has taken over the NGV's Grollo Equiset Garden. The 2016 NGV Architecture Commission, it was designed by local M@Studio Architects and modelled on the dimensions of a real car wash. Made of lightweight steel with cricket-netting walls and a translucent polycarbonate roof, it sports five bays of hot pink AstroTurf with rubberised humps and road markings. Illuminated at night with a sparkly 'car wash' sign, it hosts talks, live music and events, with two lanes diffusing cooling mist.

ABOVE: 'Haven't you always wanted...?', M@Studio Architects car wash installation for the 2016 NGV Architecture Commission


JEPPE HEIN: Semicircular Space
Until 26 February 2017

A disorientating maze of reflective stainless steel, 'Semicircular Space' by Danish-born, Berlin-based contemporary artist Jeppe Hein is a striking, immersive installation in NGV International's central Federation Court. Shaped like a sinuous nautilus, it's proving an Instagram favourite.

ABOVE: Installation view of Jeppe Hein's 'Semicircular Space', 2016


JOHN OLSEN: The You Beaut Country
Until 12 February 2017
Major Australian art exhibition 'John Olsen: The You Beaut Country' celebrates one of the country's greatest living artists, aged 88, known for his wonderful ways with colour, fluid form and grand scale. Featuring Olsen's 'You beauty country' series begun in the 1960s and inspired by Australian landscape and nature, as well as more recent prints, paintings and watercolours (including some representing Lake Eyre's return from drought), it's pure palette pleasure.

ABOVE: 'Seafood paella' oil on plywood, 2007, John Olsen, private collection


The Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia is at Federation Square; nearby NGV International is at 180 St Kilda Road, Melbourne; see website for locations of specific shows

Photos: Viktor&Rolf (David LaChapelle; Team Peter Stigter); Glenn Murcutt (Tobias Titz), copyright held by G. Murcutt on all mosque drawings and designs; NGV Architecture Commission (Peter Bennetts); Jeppe Hein (Courtesy König Galerie, Berlin, Nicholai Wallner Gallery, Copenhagen, and 303 Gallery, New York; John Olsen (Administered by Viscopy, Sydney)

At Home: Modern Australian Design

Sydney's Old Government House has been given a magical contemporary twist with 'At Home', an inspired exhibition of modern Australian design

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

We love a ramble through a stately home, but for antiques plus attitude don't miss brilliant show 'At Home: Modern Australian Design', taking over Sydney's Old Government House in Parramatta until 22 January 2017. Hosted by the National Trust and curated by eagle-eyed design editor David Clark (who formerly helmed Vogue Living), it places hand-picked contemporary objects by over 60 of the country's leading designers cheek-by-jowl with historic pieces, exploring the nation's domestic aesthetics. The result is a marriage made in style heaven, with cutting-edge furniture, lighting, textiles, wallpaper and accessories both complementing and contrasting with the original interiors, making you look at them in a fabulously fresh light.

TOP: Adam Goodrum's vibrant aluminium 'Stitch' chair (2008) for Cappellini beside his wood and Marbro 'Broached Colonial Birdsmouth' table (2011) for Broached Commissions in the Old Government House dining room. Vert Design's 2016 digitally modelled, milky-white versions of Lucien Henry's 19th-century 'Waratah' decanter and 'Protea' cups perch on the table

ABOVE: Sarah King's leather-like carbon-fibre 'Carbon Wingback' chair (2009) in the governor's office, flanked by Daniel Emma's mixed-media 'D.E Desk' accessories (2010). Laundry marker on lino artwork 'The day a white man gave a black man (his) land' (2006) by Joan Ross hangs on the wall

For an atmospheric arrival, take the ferry from Circular Quay up the Parramatta River, then walk to leafy Parramatta Park where Old Government House oozes venerable charm. The 'country home' of the first 10 governors of New South Wales, from 1799 to 1855, it's Australia's oldest surviving public building, a convict-built World Heritage site and host to a significant collection of late Georgian furniture. But the period drama really amps up once you go inside, with the exhibition's subtle and striking juxtapositions of iconic, recent and new Australian designs inserted into hallways, lounges, dining room, bedrooms and even the kitchen. 'I hope it demonstrates the more expressive edge of contemporary Australian design,' says Clark. 'The hybrids and curiosities, the bespoke and beautiful, the exuberant, quirky and odd.'

ABOVE: Louise Olsen's handmade resin 'Liquid Moon' side table (2016) in 'Seaweed Malachite' for Dinosaur Designs, with toile artwork by Cloth's Julie Paterson; Korban/Flaubert's sculptural stainless steel 'Armour' screen (2012) in the hall, complemented by chequered floors

The kernel for the show sprang from the 2011 'Broached Colonial' collection by Melbourne design studio Broached Commissions, which included work by Adam Goodrum, Charles Wilson and Trent Jansen and riffed on colonial Australia. Clark was keen to see the pieces in the context of Old Government House, alongside other modern designs. While some contemporary items have a colonial feel – from decanters and tea sets to sleekly crafted wooden chairs – others are digitally produced, streamlined products that bring 21st-century bang to the building's vintage buck, or draw on radical materials including salvaged car parts, carbon fibre and glossy resin.

ABOVE: Curves in all the right places – created especially for the exhibition Fred Ganim's Belgian oak 'Plane' table (2016), with Japanese black stain, sits below the swirling staircase

An impressive roll call of local talent is on display, from Adam Goodrum's laser-cut, folding 'Stitch' chair, designed in 2008 for Italian brand Cappellini, to Grant and Mary Featherston's vintage 'Scape' armchair from 1960, reissued in 2016 by Grazia & Co. Established pieces by Marc NewsonRobert Foster and Dinosaur Designs are here, alongside newer creations by up-and-coming names. We love Adelaide duo Daniel Emma's 'D.E Desk' accessories, Henry Wilson's bronze 'Fin' bookends, 'Stack' trays and 'Surface' sconce lamps, and Trent Jansen's terracotta 'Jugaad with Pottery' vessels, created in India.

ABOVE: Broached Commissions' 'Piano' credenza (2013) by Adam Goodrum, made from piano ivory, timber and felt, sheet music and Victorian ash, with Charles Wilson's Tasmanian blackwood 'Government' side table (2007); The sci-fi shape of Marc Newson's tubular steel, foam and wool 'Embryo' chair (1988) contrasts with its heritage surrounds

Like a sinuous racetrack, Fred Ganim's undulating 'Plane' table occupies a startling location in the atrium, below the two-story building's curvy wooden staircase. Taking the spot usually occupied by a hurricane lantern by the hall's entry portico, ADesignStudio's 'Greenway' pendant lamp teams classic hand-blown glass and brass with 3D-printed polymers and LED lights, typifying the collision of old and new in the show. Another heavenly hybrid is the 'Waratah' decanter and 'Protea' cups, originally drawn by Lucien Henry (1889-91) but digitally remodelled by Vert Design in 2016, using 3D-printed polymers. Australia's decorative past meets its high-tech future...

ABOVE: Culture-clash rules in the upstairs lounge, decorated with terracotta 'Jugaad with Pottery' by Trent Jansen, 'Matisse' chairs by Frag Woodall, brass 'Don' coffee table by Don Cameron and zig-zag LED 'Sen' light by Liam Mugavin, all 2016; In the music room, Tony Kenway's maple 'Signature' rocker (1988) and Lucy McRae's vegetable-dyed wood and metal 'Broached Colonial Prickly' lamp (2011) for Broached Commissions add a slightly surreal touch

Lovers of wallpapers and fabrics should head upstairs, where prints and textiles draped on tables and tacked to walls include work by Anna Spiro (behind the interiors of Australia's Halcyon House hotel), Oscar-winning costume designer Catherine Martin, flora and fauna-inspired Cloth (aka Julie Paterson), photographer Martyn Thompson, painterly Shilo Engelbrecht, and nature-influenced Utopia Goods. There's a compact design store and alfresco cafe for shopping and sipping afterwards. The Fizz heard a rumour that the upstairs lounge is haunted, but there's not a ghost of a chance that would put us off this thought-provoking show!
nationaltrust.org.au/event/at-home
'At Home: Modern Australian Design' is at Old Government House, Parramatta Park, Parramatta, western Sydney, until 22 January 2017. Open Tue-Sun, 10am-4pm (last admission 3.30pm); AU$18.50 for adult tickets, online or on the door.

Pictures: Michael Wee

Sydney Festival 2017

Sydney Festival, running until 29 January, brings a bubbly urban beach to town, as well as inspiring design, art, theatre, installations and music

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

FIVE FIZZPICKS AT SYDNEY FESTIVAL 2017

ABOVE: Hedonistic installation 'The Beach' at Barangaroo

The Beach
Life's a beach at Sydney's vast subterranean space The Cutaway, where an immersive installation of 1.1 million recyclable white plastic balls by experimental US art/design practice Snarkitecture forms a bubbly ocean for festive chilling. White, bright and very light, lounger-lined 'The Beach' is guaranteed shark free, so take a dip...
The Cutaway at Barangaroo Reserve, Hickson Road entrance, Barangaroo (7-29 January 2017, closed Mondays; free 10am-5pm, last admission 3.30pm; or see website for ticketed morning and evening sessions to guarantee your spot)


ABOVE: The mind-bending 'House of Mirrors' maze will amaze, and is worth experiencing both by day and night

House of Mirrors
Lose yourself in your reflection at the 'House of Mirrors', a mirrored labyrinth that messed with minds at Hobart's 2016 Dark Mofo festival. Leave at least half an hour for this disorientating update of an old fairground classic, designed by Melbourne artists Christian Wagstaff and Keith Courtney, which incorporates 15 tonnes of mirror, 40 tonnes of steel plus timber and moody illuminations. Not recommended for those prone to panic, there's only one way into the maze, but finding the way out is the real art. Free-entry Meriton Festival Village is next door for recovering afterwards with local snacks, sips and shows.
Beside Meriton Festival Village, Hyde Park North, entry near Archibald Fountain (6-29 January 2017; 4.30pm-11pm; tickets $10 at venue only)


ABOVE: Data design is becoming increasingly influential, with visual arts installation 'Exit' using it to communicate pressing global problems

Exit
An illustrated breakdown of a planet in trouble, 'Exit' surrounds viewers with a 360-degree animated world map, charting natural and manmade disasters, the displacement of populations, and the destruction of the environment, livelihoods and cultures. By New York architects Diller Scofidio + Renfro with French collaborators, this striking 45-minute visual arts work at UNSW Galleries expresses powerful data from UNESCO and the World Bank. With migration perhaps the biggest challenge for 2017, it's a design for the times.
UNSW Galleries, corner of Oxford Street and Greens Road, Paddington (7 January-25 March 2017, closed Sundays and Mondays; 10am-5pm; free)


ABOVE: 'Scent of Sydney' designs a scent for the city; Solo performance 'The Encounter' uses groundbreaking sound design to recreate an epic journey to the Amazon by a National Geographic photographer; Wearing goggles and headphones that restrict light and sound, the audience at 'Imagined Touch' experience sensory deprivation

Scent of Sydney
In our increasingly digital/virtual world, our sensory skills are falling away. Scent, in particular, has the power to trigger memories and connect us to people and places. Combining an installation with a series of talks at Carriageworks, 'Scent of Sydney' by Australian artist Cat Jones explores the question, 'Can you know a city by the way it smells?' With discussions around landscape, extravagance, competition, democracy and resistance, you're invited to contribute to an olfactory portrait of Sydney, from jasmine and frangipani to sea and sunscreen.

Also exploring sensory stimulation is immersive theatre show 'The Encounter' (18-28 January) by UK group Complicite, which uses headphones and sound design to transport the audience to the Amazon, while Jodee Mundy Collaborations' Australian performance/installation 'Imagined Touch' (9-14 January) allows you to experience sensory deprivation, with the help of deaf-blind artists.
Scent of Sydney, Carriageworks, Bay 19, 245 Wilson Street, Eveleigh (installation, 7-29 January 2017, closed Mondays; 10am-6pm; talks, 17, 18, 24, 25 January; 6pm-7pm; both free)


ABOVE: Nick Cave and PJ Harvey both share new albums at the festival

Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds / PJ Harvey
They may not be playing together, but fans of former collaborators Nick Cave and PJ Harvey will be licking their lips as the charismatic duo takes to the same stage in Sydney over consecutive nights. Charismatic UK talent Harvey is touring her devastating latest album The Hope Six Demolition Project, backed up by a 10-piece band, tackling themes from war to global poverty and loss. Grief also infuses Australian musician Cave's haunting recent album Skeleton Tree, a withering, painful tour de force, captured in a new docu-film (One More Time With Feeling) and influenced by the death of his teenage son.
ICC Sydney Theatre, Darling Drive, Darling Harbour (Nick Cave, 20 & 21 January 2017; PJ Harvey, 22 January; 7pm-approx 10.30pm; $103-$118.25)
sydneyfestival.org.au

Pictures: Noah Kalina (The Beach); Exit (Diller Scofidio + Renfro); Cat Jones (Scent of Sydney); Chloe Courtney (The Encounter); Imagined Touch (Bryony Jackson); Maria Mochnacz (PJ Harvey)

The Big Design Market Melbourne

For stylish Christmas gifts get down to The Big Design Market in Melbourne this weekend

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

For three inspiring days of Christmas shopping, backdropped by alluring architecture and fuelled by gourmet food and drink, make for The Big Design Market in Melbourne, from Friday 2 to Sunday 4 December at Carlton Gardens' Royal Exhibition Building. This homegrown design fair has won a loyal following over the last few years for its cred line-up of local talent, with 2016 gathering more than 230 designers for your delectation. Expect handmade crafts, design, homewares, fashion, jewellery, cards, art, accessories, kids' kit and more, drawn from Australian and international independents.

Look out for bespoke installations by guest artists too, including vibrant paper hangings by Benja Harney of Paperform, who has worked with fashion labels Hermès, Kenzo, Adidas and Romance Was Born, plus the Kaldor Public Art Projects. Mornington Peninsula furniture firm Industria X has also collaborated with six designers – including ceramicists Bridget Bodenham and Leah Jackson, and artist Leah Bartholomew – to create custom stools for the cocktail lounge.

TOP: Benja Harney's vibrant paper art will decorate the market
ABOVE: LED neon lighting by Electric Confetti; 'Bell Tent' by Homecamp, ideal for creating airy garden rooms; The Australian-designed 'Cape Classic' blanket from the 'Eastern Point' collection by Kate & Kate

Fizz picks include Electric Confetti's rainbow-bright neon lighting; Here and Far's graphic Japanese ceramics; Cottage Industry's kooky local crafts; and TheSuperCool and Design Dispensary for global design finds. Able and Game and Surfing Sloth are your go-tos for witty local cards. For art, visit Studio Cockatoo and Heide Museum of Modern Art's stalls. Corky Saint Clair and Bride & Wolf will kit you out in quirky modern jewellery. Also look out for contemporary South Australian furniture, lighting and accessories on the JamFactory stand. Memobottle's slimline water vessels and Orbitkey's ergonomic key fobs are great for guys; gals will love Kleins Perfumery and Leif for Australian native-inspired toiletries. For eco design, the Melb-made 'Rhombus' table trivets from Champ Co are formed from recycled aeroplane tyres.

ABOVE: Carlton's Royal Exhibition Building hosts The Big Design Market; Powder-coated steel 'Minimo' table-top plant stand by Capra Designs, shown with eco resin pot; Leah Bartholomew's artworks, including 'Philodendron' and 'Xanadu' acrylics on timber board, and 'Stay with Me' acrylic on canvas; Industria X stools in collaboration with Leah Bartholomew, Bridget Bodenham and Leah Jackson, featured in the cocktail lounge

You can eat and drink local too, with Melbourne foodie faves Beatbox Kitchen, Misschu, Taco Truck and Earl Canteen serving up snacks, LuxBite and Gelato Messina keeping the sweet treats coming, Sensory Lab serving coffee, and Port Melbourne's Starward Whisky, Merricks General Wine StoreSofi Spritz and cider co-op Faire Ferments pouring quality drops.

ABOVE: 'Geo Floral' shoulder bag handprinted with teal foiling by Tinker by Printink Studio; Orbitkey's key organiser in aqua; Botanical body balm by Leif; Kid-friendly 'Kinetic Sand' includes a bonding agent, making it easy to sculpt; 'Broad Strokes' digitally printed dog bed and 'Confetti' leather collar by Nice Digs; Melbourne's Sensory Lab will be brewing coffee

Fancy putting your own talents to the test? Then why not join in with the market's creative workshops? You can design and block-print tea towels with Home-Work, create and decorate rope baskets with Gemma Patford, make block-printing stamps to customise cards and gift wrap with Beci Orpin, or learn the trade secrets of terrariums with Petite Green. Sessions are selling out fast, so get in quick. Rock up early for a chance to buy a designer showbag ($25 each, but worth $200), limited to 300 each day and drawn from the stallholders (think sneaky presents for your posse). Remember, it's the thought that counts...
melbourne.thebigdesignmarket.com

ABOVE: Workshops include block-printing with Home-Work and basket decorating with Gemma Patford


The Big Design Market is at Royal Exhibition Building, 9 Nicholson Street, Carlton, Melbourne, from 2-4 December 2016; Fri 10am-9pm, Sat 10am-7pm, Sun 10am-5pm; adults $2, free for kids 12 and under. See our earlier post for more on Sydney's market last week