LDF 2017 – Why designjunction should be in your diary this September

unnamed-3.jpg

Must-see show designjunction in the King's Cross Creative Quarter should be a definite date in your London Design Festival diary

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

One of our top picks for this year's London Design Festival, influential show designjunction (21-24 September 2017) offers a curated edit of up-and-coming and established design talent in north London's King's Cross Creative Quarter. Discover more than 200 exhibitors, including top global furniture, lighting and accessory brands, across five industrial spaces at key hub Granary Square, also home to pop-up shops and intriguing installations. Here's how to navigate #djKX's five show areas, plus a few tips for tipples afterwards!

ABOVE: At the core of 2017's designjunction, Granary Square's Gateways installation by Adam Nathaniel Furman celebrates Turkish tiles


DJ_LONDON_bloomon-installation-render-1.jpg

ABOVE: Flower power is the go at bloomon's floral walkway at Granary Square

Granary Square
At the heart of designjunction, Granary Square hosts the event's Box Office, housed in three glass pavilions by Remote Possibilities. Book or collect tickets here, or find out the skinny on the show. This central location is also home to flagship projects and installations. 

Your camera will thank you for starting at Gateways, by designer Adam Nathaniel Furman for Turkishceramics, which celebrates Turkey's love affair with artisanal tiles. Four tiled, four-metre-high gates – dubbed Classic, Timber, Retro and Metro – will immerse you in colour and pattern, proof of the enduring appeal of ceramics.

Renault-Trezor-car-image-2.jpeg

ABOVE: Renault – Life Designed unveils new concept car TreZor

Cutting-edge car design is the star at bespoke interactive showcase Renault – Life Designed, which sees the French firm's award-bagging new concept car TreZor unveiled for the first time in the UK under the theme 'Beautiful Life', alongside a collaborative exhibition with Central Saint Martins MA industrial design students sharing ideas for the modular car of the future.

For pastel-hued flower power, check out bloomon's whimsical bloom-decked passage incorporating a secret door to a flower-filled room for intimate workshops and talks. Crafted by the floral delivery service – which sources stock direct from Dutch fields – it should inspire outdoor living ideas, as well as looking a treat on Instagram.


DJ_LONDON_KIRKBY DESIGN x ELEY KISHIMOTO_1061_c_HR.jpg

Cubitt House & Cubitt Park
A stellar line-up of international design brands beckons at Granary Square's Cubitt House, displayed within a customised temporary structure, including furniture, lighting and accessories. Be sure to scope out Another Country, Bethan Gray and Deadgood. On the ground-floor you'll find popular show lightjunction, an illuminating mix of decorative lighting and emerging design labels. On the top floor, contract and residential brands present their latest products, especially interesting for trade and industry visitors. Cubitt Park is a new zone for 2017, combining emerging designers, luxury homewares and The Material Collective, a collaboration with SCIN gallery, investigating forward-looking materials.

ABOVE: Inspired by a mutual love of pattern, Kirkby Design x Eley Kishimoto recently presented 11 new wallcoverings to complement their upholstery fabrics, drawing on textural flocks, metallic prints and reflective surfaces. They've teamed up again in new area Cubitt Park to create VIP and press area The Lounge, host to several exhibitions and events


DJ_LONDON-THE-CANOPY-2016.jpg

The Canopy
Hot to shop? Temporary pop-up The Canopy in Granary Square brings together more than 70 desirable retail brands and emerging design labels under one striking wrought-iron structure, including homewares, stationery, tech goods, ceramics, glassware, textiles, architectural prints and fashion accessories. Look out for Fizz faves Adelaide furniture and product designers D.E (Daniel Emma), accessories brand &Ratio, and print duo Tom Pigeon.

ABOVE: designjunction's retail shopping zone The Canopy


designjunction-exhibitions-installations-london-design-festival-2017_dezeen_2364_col_14-852x906.jpg

The Crossing
Expect installations by the likes of Kirkby Design, surface material maker Corian and OLED lighting specialists Blackbody at The Crossing, a five-storey zone which runs through Granary Building and the entry to Central Saint Martins, joining Cubitt House and The Canopy. This is also where you can spy new and graduate talent at the Rado Star Prize UK, launched for the first time and backed by the design-led Swiss watch brand.

ABOVE: French studios Blackbody and Haviland's bespoke contemporary chandelier cluster, 'Helen, Light & Porcelain', illuminates The Crossing area

DJ_LONDON_TALA_VORONOI-II-BULB-BRASS-PENDANT-1.jpg
21056146_1481039538654861_1034137495854660526_o.jpg

ABOVE FROM TOP: Lighting designer Tala will host a pop-up bar in Granary Square in a vintage car; Campari Creates takes to the water with a red-hued narrowboat bar

Creative cocktails
Worked up a thirst? Channel the spirit of Milan's Navigli canals at Campari Creates, a narrowboat bar dedicated to the iconic red aperitif. An art installation will accompany its two-week residency, alongside creative masterclasses. At Granary Square's Tala Mini Bar, high-end LED lighting bulb designer Tala will take over a refurbished vintage Mini Cooper as an impromptu bar, pouring white ports and tonics. The forest-inspired canopy, formed from 'Voronoi' bulbs, will look especially dazzling after a couple of cocktails...
thedesignjunction.co.uk

designjunction London 2017 is at 1 Granary Square, London N1, from Thursday 21 to Sunday 24 September 2017. For an advance ticket deal see our home page or click here for registration, opening hours and visitor information. Tickets are £12 in advance (free for trade), or £15 on the door.

Folkestone Triennial 2017

FT 2017 - Thierry Bal - Richard Woods 3.jpg

The fourth Folkestone Triennial is in full swing with international artists making their mark by the sea. Come on down, the water's lovely...

BY DEE IVA

FT 2017 - Thierry Bal - Sol Calero 2.jpg

When the first Folkestone Triennial debuted in 2008 in the sleepy English seaside town of Folkestone in Kent, it seemed like a big ask. Twenty-nine internationally acclaimed artists including Tracey Emin, Mark Wallinger and Jeremy Deller were commissioned by White Cube curator Andrea Schlieker to contribute brand new artworks to be installed around town, some to remain on a permanent basis. It was a stroke of genius that immediately put Folkestone on the cultural landscape, blowing away all traces of candy floss and 'kiss me quick' hats in one fell swoop.

Nine years later and Folkestone is hosting the fourth Triennial under the guidance of Lewis Biggs, former director of Tate Liverpool. This is the second Triennial curated by Biggs who took over from Schlieker to host the 2014 Triennial (which became notorious for artist Michael Sailstorfer's Folkestone gold rush, when blocks of gold were rumoured to be buried on the beach, sparking a rush on sales of buckets and spades). This year's show has been titled 'Double Edge' by Biggs, who says, 'The exhibition theme refers to the two main axes around which Folkestone's development has taken place: the seashore and the Pent Stream (also the edge between East and West Folkestone). It's also an invitation to consider the ambiguity and complexity, the double entendre, that is intrinsic to art.'

ABOVE: One of Richard Woods' miniature 'Holiday Home' bungalows floats in Folkestone Harbour
ABOVE RIGHT: Detail from Sol Calero's 'Casa Anacaona'
BELOW: A cast-iron figure from Antony Gormley's 2013 series 'Another Time' stares at the sea

MICHAEL CRAIG MARTIN.jpg

ABOVE: The junction of the Old High Street and Tontine Street displays Michael Craig-Martin's 'Folkestone Lightbulb' and one of Bob and Roberta Smith's 'Folkestone Is An Art School' banners

Once again, for 2017, major artists are showing works in various locations around town, including David Shrigley's quirky 'Lamp Post' on The Leas. Perhaps the best known is sculptor Antony Gormley who has secreted two cast-iron figures from his 2013 ‘Another Time’ series around Folkestone Harbour. Michael Craig-Martin's ‘Folkestone Lightbulb’ adorns the exterior of a building at the junction of Tontine Street and the Old High Street in Folkestone’s Creative Quarter, and within the same building is a ‘come and play’ workshop set up by Bob and Roberta Smith who has declared that ‘Folkestone Is An Art School’. His signature typography can be seen on signs and banners everywhere and accompany 12 short videos and an inclusive teaching facility and programme. Also in the Creative Quarter is a fleet of gilded ships by Jonathan Wright, 3D-printed replicas of fishing vessels based in or operating out of Folkestone Harbour. These glittering boats are located above eye level atop lampposts in Tontine Street. Educational space The Cube, also in Tontine Street, has been in need of a repaint as its original red coat faded over the years. New York-born artist Sinta Tantra has wrapped it in an eye-catching abstract pattern inspired by the designs of French artist Sonia Delaunay.

ship and house.jpg

ABOVE FROM LEFT: Ship ahoy! Jonathan Wright's 'Fleet On Foot' vessels glide serenely above street level; Another of Richard Woods' 'Holiday Home' bungalows appears washed up on the beach

Six colourful mini bungalows by designer Richard Woods are dotted around Folkestone in unusual places. On the beach, floating in the harbour or secluded on a clifftop, Woods’ ‘Holiday Home’ is a poignant statement on second homes and the current housing crisis in the UK. His collaborations with Brit design brand Established & Sons and Danish studio Hay have made him a longtime Fizz fave.

A house of a different kind can also be found at sea level. Open sided, Sol Calero’s bright ‘Casa Anacaona’ sits on the shingle inviting you to sit and take in the sea air. With drawings and painting from local children and creatives, and vibrant furniture, it’s the most cheerful and humorous exhibit on display. In complete contrast, around the corner in Folkestone's small sandy bay, stark black angular graphics by Gary Woodley snake around under and over the concrete walkway at the rear of the beach.

Folkestone Triennial 2017 - MAP-1.jpg

ABOVE FROM LEFT: Gary Woodley's 'Impingement No. 66'; The Cube in Tontine Street is given a makeover by Sinta Tantra

Animating Folkestone, the Triennial encourages visitors and residents alike to explore areas beyond the central shopping streets. Equipped with a comprehensive map you can follow a treasure trail from warren to beach, clifftop to harbour, in search of artworks old and new. This can be thirsty work but luckily there are plenty of tempting spots to refuel. The harbour arm itself now has a number of bars and eateries including a champagne bar in the old lighthouse right at the far end. Mark Sargeant’s Rocksalt, the first notable restaurant to open in town, serves up freshly caught seafood and brasserie-style cuisine and has a first-floor terrace where you can perch for cocktails or tasty bar snacks. Sargeant also owns The Smokehouse, just behind Rocksalt, Folkestone’s finest chippy.

Hang out with the hipsters in the Lime Bar Cafe on Tontine Street or head to Steep Street cafe on the Old High Street for coffee and small bites. The Old High Street is also where you’ll find a clutch of stylish independent shops, such as Kitty McCall, Atelier Feralchild and Maison Marine, as well as stalwart vintage accessories store Rennies.

So if you’re looking for an art fix while soaking up some seaside sun, double-edged Folkestone's the place to tick both boxes in style...
folkestonetriennial.org.uk

The Folkestone Triennial is on now until 5 November 2017. Visit the website for the full roster of artists and programme of events
Pictures by Thierry Bal/Dee Iva

6 FizzPicks for Sydney Contemporary 2017

21317624_1603035903104311_5404755814361373347_n.jpg

Sydney Contemporary brings the best local and international art galleries to town. See our guide to six must-sees...

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Get your art on at the third edition of Sydney Contemporary, an exciting showcase of 90 galleries representing more than 500 modern artists at Redfern's warehouse-chic Carriageworks. The four-day fair runs until this Sunday 10 September, including a mix of established and emerging talent (check out the Future section, for galleries going five years or less). Also up for grabs are installations, video, paper works, performance, a playfully interactive red room for children, and a programme of talks, tours and fringe events. There's tempting drinking and dining for refuelling, with tasty bites from Billy Kwong and Kitchen by Mike and pop-up bars by Glenfiddich and Petaluma.

Showcasing local galleries from Australia and New Zealand as well as global offerings spanning Singapore, Hong Kong, Berlin, Chile, Argentina, the USA and even Iran – look out for Tehran's Dastan's Basement (booth A03) with its hyper-detailed paintings – it's a huge gathering. So here our six of our favourites to get you inspired...

ABOVE: Robyn Stacey's mirrored camera obscura 'Double Take' installation, outside Sydney Contemporary art fair at Redfern's former railway yard Carriageworks

install2.jpg

May Space: Catherine O'Donnell
Combining incredibly detailed drawings of windows and doors with a graphic mural of a house, Catherine O'Donnell's 'Urban Perspective' installation at Sydney gallery May Space (booth A14) is startling. O'Donnell grew up in an estate building in Sydney's western suburbs, which informs her work. "My drawings are an exploration of the architecture , culture, and history of the urban environment with a current focus on 1960/70 housing estates," she says, homes she feels are overlooked, both aesthetically and in human terms. "I employ realism as a catalyst to ignite the imagination of the viewer and invite them to look beyond the mundane and banal."

ABOVE: Catherine O'Donnell's charcoal on paper 'Urban Perspective' (2017) at the May Space booth, inset in a charcoal wall drawing


Sabbia Gallery: Honor Freeman and Pippin Drysdale
Sydney's Sabbia Gallery (booth G08) specialises in Australian contemporary studio ceramics and glass, bringing high-end craft to the fair's art and design table. We loved Adelaide talent Honor Freeman's dazzling ceramic work 'Soap Score' (2016), containing a circle of 656 slip-cast porcelain pieces resembling shards of soap, reflecting the amount of soap an average human supposedly uses in their lifetime. The textures, shapes and faded pastel colours are beautiful, reflecting Freeman's long preoccupation with being an 'alchemist of domestic clutter'. Established Freemantle artist Pippin Drysdale's boulder-like series of porcelain works are also striking, incised with gorgeous coloured glazes, so fine they almost resemble glass.

ABOVE FROM LEFT: Honor Freeman's slip-cast porcelain 'Soap Score'; detail of its 656 components; Pippin Drysdale's seven-component porcelain 'Geikie Gorge I – Devil's Marbles III' (2017) in foreground, both Sabbia Gallery


12793.jpeg

Martin Browne Contemporary: teamLab
Digital art gets the nod at Sydney gallery Martin Browne Contemporary (booth E10), which stars a large-scale, nine-channel digital work by Japan's teamLab. Entitled 'Continuous Life and Death at the Now of Eternity' (2017), it's a mesmerising nature-meets-tech spectacular of shifting colours, light and moods, with an algorithm creating an endless moving image of flowers being born, budding and blooming, then withering and dying. Rendered in real-time, not a pre-recorded loop, it takes its cue from the local sunrise and sunset, changing throughout the year, so it's never the same twice. "The picture at this moment can never be seen again," say its makers. Sneaky art hounds who charm their way into the fair's VIP lounge can see another stunning, six-channel teamLab digital creation – 'Four Seasons, a 1000 Years, Terraced Rice Fields – Tashibunosho' – in which computer-generated workers in rice fields respond to real-time weather, daylight and seasons in the Japanese region, ploughing in sunshine, sheltering from rain or dancing at night. While the original landscape has been largely unchanged for a century, the art work will be ever-changing, a new frontier for modern art. Look out for the collective's eight interactive Future Park installations at Sydney's Powerhouse Museum this summer.

ABOVE: Japanese collective teamLab's endless digital work 'Continuous Life and Death at the Now of Eternity' (2017) at Martin Browne Contemporary's stand


21314511_1646843945357686_6498011932534841273_n.jpg

Yavuz Gallery Projects: Lucas Grogan
You'll find colour inspiration aplenty at the fair, but Melbourne-based muralist Lucas Grogan's installation for Singapore's Yavuz Gallery Projects (booth A07) has the blue mother lode. Taking up major wall space, his trio of graphic ink works 'The Library' and single piece 'The Collection' all depict shelves of fictitious blue books with cheeky titles on the spines, mingled with the odd horse-head ornament, urn or bowl. As Grogan quipped on his Instagram, "If you spot a typo, keep it to your f••king self." Known for detailed, witty street art in trademark indigo blue, teamed with turquoise, navy and white, he's a colourist to watch.

ABOVE: Detail from multi-panel 'The Library' (2017) by Lucas Grogan, ink, acrylic and enamel on marine ply at Yavuz Gallery


ArterealJuly2017Selects-004.jpg

Arterial Gallery: Hayden Fowler
It's not often you see a performance art work involving a guy trapped in a cage with a dingo, but Hayden Fowler offers just that in 'Together again' for Arterial Gallery (booth G03), donning virtual reality goggles which trigger Australian landscape images, while a motion sensor worn by his companion Juno places the wild dog in the frame too. It's shades of Joseph Beuys' 1974 action with the coyote, but given a 21st-century new-tech spin, exploring the growing gap in our relationship with the natural world. Don't miss Fowler's second installation 'Australia' near the VIP Room, a colonial-style table loaded with white bones, linked to a tannoy, a challenging comment on Australia's painful treatment of its first people.

ABOVE: Hayden Fowler's plaster, polymer and sound 'Australia' (2017) installation for Arterial Gallery comments on the violence of colonialism


21427329_1418584691582011_7398452320879636035_o.jpg

107, Blak Mirror
Small but packing a mixed-media punch, local Redfern gallery 107 (booth C06) shares bold contemporary work by Aboriginal artists in its group show 'The Gilded Age', presented with Blak Mirror. Riffing on the glossy veneer covering today's pressing political and indigenous issues, it includes work by Jason Wing, Amala Groom, and Adam Hill (aka Blak Douglas) – who created the suspended gilded bat above – with traditional wooden shields by Chico Monks, inscribed with cartoonish phrases ('Oops', 'Bang', 'Sorry!'), sitting alongside Nicole Monks' 'Wabarn-Wabarn' chair, made from kangaroo leather draped in plush kangaroo pelts.

Finally, look out for 'Edition', a curated selection of design-art furniture near the entrance area, showcasing pieces by top brands Gufram, Established & Sons, BD Barcelona Design, and the limited-edition 'QTZ' chair by local talent Alexander Lotersztain for Derlot, curated by Sydney furniture label Living Edge. Who said art and design can't mix?

ABOVE: 107 gallery's group stand, including an amazing golden bat by Blak Douglas, bones and other mixed materials, foregrounding Aboriginal  perspectives

Sydney Contemporary is at Carriageworks, 245 Wilson Street, Redfern, Sydney until Sunday 10 September 2017; opening hours 10am-6pm Saturday, until 5pm Sunday. For ticket and visitor information click here.

LDF 2017 – King's Cross Creative Quarter

St-Pancras-Renaissance-External.jpg

Gearing up for London Design Festival 2017? We preview the buzzy King's Cross Creative Quarter, home to major show designjunction and a host of enticing events

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Like an excitable octopus, London Design Festival's tentacles wriggle out to all areas of the capital. Running from 16 to 24 September 2017, it's a huge – and hugely inspiring – annual event, but with its growing popularity, comes mushrooming scale. Savvy design hunters need to use their time (and shoe leather) wisely, which is why we recommend a visit to one-stop-style-shop the King's Cross Creative Quarter (KXCQ). This once-industrial north London zone offers not only regenerated canalside architecture, boutiques and restaurants, but also hosts exhibitions and installations for LDF17, including must-see four-day fair designjunction (21-24 September).

20933880_1476780345747447_4493418755179156650_o.jpg

designjunction London 2017
A curated edit of established and up-and-coming design talent, designjunction is divided into five distinct show areas in and around Granary Square. Last year's edition attracted more than 27,000 visitors, and 2017 is set to be even bigger, with more than 200 global exhibitors on display and expanded area Cubitt Park joining the party. Expect spectacular lighting, furniture, accessories, technology and futuristic materials, alongside pop-ups, interactive installations and even a chance to do a spot of design shopping at retail zone The Canopy. Fizz-rated brands in the frame include Another CountryDecode, Design House Stockholm, Isokon Plus, and Very Good & Proper.

For inspiration, don't miss #djKX's two-day Talks Programme (21-22 September), launched this year, held at The Office Group in Kings's Cross, designed by Wells Mackereth and Studio Downie Architects (The Stanley Building, 1 Pancras Road). Over 50 speakers at 14 debates and discussions will engage with the pressing issues in design today, under the theme 'Where Design Meets'. Participants include renowned industrial designer Sir Kenneth Grange and trendsetting interior decorators 2 Lovely Gays. Book online; tickets £6 each. You can also enjoy a New London Neighbourhood Tour (23 September, 2-4pm), guided by NLA (New London Architecture), exploring the quarter's fast-moving architectural scene. Book spots for the walk online, £18 each.

TOP: The King's Cross Creative Quarter in North London, including the Victorian Gothic St Pancras Renaissance Hotel, will be a key hub for LDF
ABOVE: 'Renault: Life Designed' presents new concept car TreZor at Granary Square as part of designjunction 2017
BELOW: Exhibition 'Can Graphic Design Save Your Life?' at Wellcome Collection presents Tiger, Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona

Wellcome-Collection-1.jpg

Wellcome Collection: Can Graphic Design Save Your Life?
The vital role of graphic design in communicating and championing health care, and empowering users, is examined in this exhibition hosted by free science-focussed museum the Wellcome Collection at nearby 183 Euston Road, NW1 (7 September 2017-14 January 2018).

21055105_1482481888510626_5818475774842540306_o.jpg

The Food Religion
Studio Appétit and Conran + Partners collaborate on The Food Religion, exploring culinary rituals and the intersection of food, faith, design and architecture. For a feast of ideas, and a monumental shrine to dining, visit German Gymnasium restaurant at 1 King's Boulevard, the venue for this challenging installation/show.

ABOVE: Conran + Partners x Studio Appétit presents 'The Food Religion'
BELOW FROM TOP: Creative cuisine is yours to command at Dishoom restaurant and German Gymnasium, part of the KXCQ foodie scene

2Dishoom_KX_Entrance.jpg
German-Gymnasium-Grand-Cafe-1.jpg

Design-led Dining
Ready to refuel? Alongside pop-up dining experiences at designjunction itself – including street food in Granary Square and an interactive cafe in Cubitt Park – you'll find a posse of design-led restaurants in the burgeoning King's Cross Creative Quarter. Fizz favourites include tiletastic Indian Dishoom, inspired by Bombay's retro Irani cafes and occupying a former railway transit shed, built in 1850; glam grand-scale German Gymnasium, serving Mittel-European treats across two floors with heated terraces; and brunch destinations Caravan, in a Grade 11-listed Victorian grain store, and Australian-born cafe/restaurant Granger & Co. So dig in at King's Cross – where design meets delicious...
thedesignjunction.co.uk/kingscrosscreativequarter

designjunction is at 1 Granary Square, King's Cross, London N1 from Thursday 21 to Sunday 24 September 2017; see website for varying daily opening hours. To register click via the DesignFizz home page; standard tickets are £12 in advance (free for trade professionals) or £15 on the door. 

 

 

Sydney Indesign 2017

C-IYwHJXoAAWSX2.jpg

Sydney Indesign 2017 brings two days of design fun to town, from product launches to happening precincts 

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Whether you're in the design industry or simply a passionate design hunter, Sydney Indesign will tempt you out to play. Held every two years, it hits town this Friday 11 and Saturday 12 August, offering '2 Days, 4 Districts, 50 exhibitors, 300+ brands and $50,000 of prizes to be won!' Just register for free at any participating showroom to join in the fun, which includes product launches, special projects, seminars and design store gatherings. Cue bubbles!

For #SID17, the action is focussed on Sydney's growing inner-south design precincts, Alexandria and Waterloo, with a host of design showrooms and studios welcoming visitors across both districts. In Alexandria, look out for LightCo (100 Collins Street) celebrating a new lighting collaboration, and Savage Design (40-42 O'Riordan Street), launching its 'Dave', 'Dale' and 'Rob' ranges of architectural hardware. In Waterloo, Cafe Culture + Insitu's pop-up (1F Danks Street) will showcase the 'Rail' modular office table system by German duo Kaschkasch for Zeitraum.

ABOVE: Vibrant outdoor 'Vega' aluminium wicker chairs and bistro table by Maiori at Obodo, which will showcase new designs at The Venue

Alexandria also features two curated multi-brand group shows. The Venue (55 Doody Street) hosts around 30 select design brands, including furniture, lighting, outdoor living, surface materials and more. Look out for fab modernist-inspired, Minneapolis-born brand Blu Dot, launching its 'Cat's Pajamas' lounge chair, as well as Hong Kong-based designer Sean Dix's four fresh furniture launches for Obodo. Get a taste for Dutch contemporary design at NL Curated, prior to its Surry Hills pop-up this October, or savour Japanese and British talent at Sydney-based SeehoSu's stand, sharing designs by Naoto Fukasawa and Jasper Morrison for Maruni.

ABOVE: Blu Dot's new ash and bent powder-coated steel 'Cat's Pajamas' lounge chair, featured at The Venue, available in five colour combinations

Discover a dozen more brands at group show B2 Studios (46-62 Maddox Street, Alexandria), which features Sydney talent Tom Fereday's work for Dessein, Gavin Harris's new 'Toku' range for Australian furniture-maker Schiavello, plus Melbourne label Didier's latest furniture and local industrial design studio So Watt's freshest creations in Pioneer, the show's dedicated Australian design hub.

Planning a visit? Both design districts and the two multi-brand zones will be open on Friday from noon to 6pm (with various Up Late Events at select venues from 6pm until 10pm), and on Saturday from 10am to 6pm. A free hop-on, hop-off shuttle bus on Saturday will help you move between venues. Check out Sydney Indesign's website for an online handbook and maps, list of timed events, the thought-provoking ticketed seminar series (starring international guest speakers) and 15 collaborative installations under The Project banner (this year's theme is 'Click', exploring instant connectivity). See you out on the design trail...
indesigntheevent.com/sydney