Sydney Design Festival 2019 – 5 Must-Sees

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Sydney Design Festival 2019 brings inspiring exhibitions, talks and workshops to town. Here are five Fizz faves for getting your design on!

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Sydney Design Festival is back for 2019, unpacking new design, sharing emerging and established talents, and tackling design challenges. This year’s theme is ‘Accessing Design’, making design accessible to fresh audiences, with the action spread beyond the obvious inner-city hot spots. Running from 1 to 10 March – but with many shows lasting longer – the festival also shines a light on local design, including indigenous creativity, hosting events from exhibitions to talks, workshops, open studios, screenings and parties. Here are five of our #SDF19 Fizz faves…

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TOP: Sydney Design Festival keynote speaker Rachel Wingfield of Loop.pH with a range of dynamic past projects. ABOVE: Loop.pH’s ‘Arborescence’ installation for 2014’s Amsterdam Light Festival, proposing a future hybrid of trees and street lighting harnessing the studio’s signature bio-luminescence. Think sustainable ‘living lighting’

FESTIVAL KEYNOTE: RACHEL WINGFIELD OF LOOP.PH
Powerhouse Museum, 500 Harris Street, Ultimo
8 March (6pm-8pm)

London designer Rachel Wingfield, co-founder with Mathias Gmachl of Loop.pH, will give the festival keynote speech at Ultimo’s Powerhouse Museum. Launched in 2003, their spatial laboratory is known for cross-disciplinary designs that combine digital, light, art and craft details, often in public spaces. Exploring design, architecture and science, Loop.pH’s intriguing installations and experiences harness diverse materials from LEDs, electro-luminous fibres and NASA’s reflective silver mylar to carbon, bamboo and algae. Buy tickets to the talk online or check out Wingfield’s collaborative workshop ‘Archilace’ on Sunday 10 March (3pm-5pm).

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ABOVE: Mungo Scott Flour Mill, historic home to authentic Australian design showcase ‘Home.Grown’ in Summer Hill

HOME.GROWN//DISCOVERING AUSTRALIAN DESIGN
Mungo Scott Flour Mill, 2 Smith Street, Summer Hill
8-10 March

A three-day celebration of Australian furniture, lighting and home furnishings, ‘Home.Grown’ is presented by the Authentic Design Alliance and curated by its director Anne-Maree Sargeant. Expect three halls over two levels featuring exhibitions, installations and pop-ups, championing locally designed and made products and homegrown talents. All up you’ll discover around 175 designers and 100 brands. Ground Floor Hall 1 features a combined showcase of designers and smaller independent brands, spanning innovative lighting by Lumil, rugs by Designer Rugs and stylish storage by Sagitine, alongside a pop-up mini mart of Australian homewares available to buy from top3 by design. Installations occupy Ground Floor Hall 2, including ‘Undervalued’ by Nick Rennie, ‘Project Replica’ by Mitch Tobin, ‘Brand a Fake’ by ADA, ‘Used by 3018’ by Will Thompson, a Mercedes-Benz Design Award display and atmospheric photos of the historic venue itself. Upstairs, the First Floor Gallery presents curated zones by 10 established Australian design brands, including Nau, Catapult, Didier, Furnished Forever and Artedomus (‘New Volumes’). Talks, starring talents including Adam Goodrum, Adam Cornish and Christina Bricknell, tackle issues affecting the country’s design scene. The location is a wow too, with the event taking over the 1922 Mungo Scott Flour Mill. A free preview afternoon on Friday 8 March is by RSVP only; for the weekend, buy advance tickets cheaper online or snap them up at the door.

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ABOVE: Trent Jansen’s ‘Tidal Lounger’ chairs and ‘Tidal Coffee Table’, made from premium stainless steel wire for Australian outdoor living brand Tait, feature in ADC’s exhibition ‘Steel’

STEEL: ART DESIGN ARCHITECTURE
Australian Design Centre, 101-115 William Street, Darlinghurst
Until 3 April (closed Sundays and Mondays)

Discover the innovative ways artists, designers and architects are using steel in the 21st century at this major touring exhibition from Adelaide’s JamFactory. Free to visit at Darlinghurst’s Australian Design Centre, it showcases the work of 29 Australian creatives, including Korban/Flaubert’s bold steel sculptures, Trent Jansen’s wave-inspired ‘Tidal’ outdoor furniture collection for Tait, and BVN’s graphic Australian PlantBank research building at Mount Annan in New South Wales. A selection of steely works is also displayed across the road at Stylecraft’s showroom (24/100 William Street). Fancy some craft shopping? ADC hosts a Makers Market on Saturday 9 March (10am-4pm), featuring more than 27 local makers.

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ABOVE: ‘Purple with Black, White and Blue’ photo (detail) by Jon Setter, part of the artist’s exhibition ‘The Urban Text’ at design store Koskela

JON SETTER: THE URBAN TEXT
Koskela, 1/85 Dunning Avenue, Rosebery
Until 31 March

This series of 12 minimal photographs explores the unnoticed aspects of urban environments and our everyday streetscapes. Detroit-born, Sydney-based Jon Setter’s free exhibition ‘The Urban Text’ is on show at inspiring design store Koskela in Rosebery, so call in for a culture fix, then stick around to shop for Australian-made furniture, homewares and accessories. The artworks are available to buy as unframed prints in three sizes, and their abstract, graphic, simple, colour-block style will look a treat on your wall. Feeling peckish? Three Blue Ducks cafe shares this atmospheric former factory space.

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ABOVE: Bernabei Freeman’s contemporary ceramic ‘Hybrid Vessel’ (2018), incorporating 3D-printed ABS and handwoven rattan, is part of digital craft show ‘Femufacture’ at The Japan Foundation

FEMUFACTURE: JAPANESE AND AUSTRALIAN DESIGN
The Japan Foundation Gallery, Level 4, Central Park, 28 Broadway, Chippendale
Until 30 March (closed Sundays)

Lovers of craft and design will enjoy cutting-edge exhibition ‘Femufacture’, which explores the interface of craft traditions and digital fabrication technologies. Hosted by The Japan Foundation Gallery, upstairs in Chippendale’s Central Park mall, it features new works by Japanese and Australian women including 3D-printed ceramic and hand-woven rattan vessels by Melbourne’s Bernabei Freeman (Rina Bernabei and Kelly Freeman). Mediums include weaving, wood turning, indigo-dyeing, paper cut, silversmithing and knitting, combined with 3D printing, CNC machining, coding and robotics. The show also includes wearable technology by light artist Erina Kashihara, who joins the gallery’s free panel discussion to mark International Women’s Day (8 March, 6.30pm-8pm).

sydneydesign.com.au/2019

Sydney Design Festival 2019 runs until Sunday 10 March at venues across the city, but many events continue beyond this weekend. For more inspiration check out SDF’s suggested itineraries, from free and family-friendly ideas to sustainable thinking and design after dark.

LDF 2018 – 11 Fizz Faves for London Design Festival

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Enjoy all the fun of the fair at this week’s London Design Festival, with our 11 must-see installations and showcases around town…

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

This year’s London Design Festival is in full swing, bringing a bewildering array of new design launches and exhibitions to town. We’ve already shared our top tips for the thought-provoking London Design Biennale and festival hub the V&A, but here are 11 citywide FizzPicks for design inspiration, taking in landmark projects, alfresco installations and seductive showrooms.

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ES DEVLIN: ‘PLEASE FEED THE LIONS’
Attracting Insta love in Trafalgar Square – as well as confused looks from tourists – interactive design ‘Please Feed The Lions’ is a collaboration between British artist/stage designer Es Devlin and Google Arts & Culture. A fifth fluorescent red lion has joined the square’s big cat statues, roaring out a crowd-sourced, collective poem. Tap in your word via the on-site screen or online to see it displayed in LEDs in the lion’s mouth. The streaming text is also projection-mapped over Nelson’s Column and the lion at night. Naturally, we fed it the words ‘design’ and ‘fizz’.
Trafalgar Square, London WC2 (18-23 September)

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KELLENBERGER-WHITE: ‘ALPHABET’
Sit on a letter or make words with the 26 vibrant, alphabet chairs at interactive installation ‘Alphabet’ in Broadgate. An experiment in folding metal to create a typographic system, the bespoke seats were designed by London graphic design consultancy Kellenberger-White, known for their playful approach to typefaces. Their inspirations ranged from Bauhaus designers to artist Bruno Munari. Each chair is a different colour, daubed in specialist industrial paint, ranging from orange to cornflower blue.
Finsbury Avenue Square, Broadgate, London EC2 (15-23 September)

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SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS: ‘TIME FOR TEA’
Take ‘Time For Tea’ at Fortnum & Mason with help from Scholten & Baijings. The Dutch design duo will draw on more than 80 global designs for this installation celebrating the dainty ritual, drawing inspiration from the store’s signature eau de Nil colour and gorgeous green hues. The tabletop setting encompasses a new porcelain tea set produced by 1616/Arita, plus furniture, accessories and limited-edition pieces contrasting tradition with cutting-edge Dutch creativity. Featured products include chairs by HAY, Moroso and Karimoku New Standard, curtains by Maharam, and marble tables and flooring by Luce di Carrara.
First Floor, Fortnum & Mason, 181 Piccadilly, London W1 (15-23 September)

TOM DIXON: ‘ELECTROANALOGUE’
UK designer Tom Dixon hosts ‘Electroanalogue’ at his new HQ and shop The Coal Office in Kings Cross. Expect product launches, live demonstrations and workshops exploring digital innovations and traditional craft, including group show ‘Hyper Real’. Mates on board include Bill Amberg Studio (see below), sound designer Yuri Suzuki, Ege carpets, Kirkby Design, Formica, Spiritland bar and Teenage Engineering showcasing a synthesiser in a Seventies-style disco. The space is part of Coal Drops Yard, a cutting-edge shopping and dining street opening on 26 October with design by Thomas Heatherwick.
The Coal Office, 4-10 Bagley Walk Arches, Coal Drops Yard, Kings Cross, London N1 (15-23 September)

BILL AMBERG: ‘PRINTED LEATHER LAUNCH’ AT TOM DIXON STUDIO
Luxe leather brand Bill Amberg Studio presents a stunning new collection of digitally printed leathers, including British contributions from Faye Toogood, Timorous Beasties and Tom Dixon, and American-based interior designers Alexandra Champalimaud and Natasha Baradaran. It’s a gamechanger for the industry, with patterns spanning colourful sketches, splattered damasks, lace, circles, foil and rock graphics.
The Coal Office, 4-10 Bagley Walk Arches, Coal Drops Yard, Kings Cross, London N1 (15-23 September)

LEE BROOM: ‘OBSERVATORY’
British boy wonder Lee Broom brings his stellar-inspired lighting collection ‘Observatory’ to his Shoreditch showroom, a hit in Milan and New York. Playing with vertical and horizontal space, sculptural and spherical form, and light reflection and refraction, the third edition of this glamorous yet ultra-contemporary range includes pendant and table lights, making luxe use of LEDs and bespoke bulbs designed in-house.
Lee Broom, 93 Rivington Street, London EC2 (18-23 September)

HOUSE OF GREY
Book online to see House of Grey’s gorgeous North London pop-up exhibition ‘In the Neighbourhood’, a brilliant edit of local and international designers, artists and makers in two residential settings. Curated by Louisa Grey and Morgwyn Rimel, elegant townhouse ‘The Grey House’ creates a calm atmosphere celebrating texture, neutral tones, handmade craft and natural materials. By contrast, loft-style ‘The Blue House’ occupies a converted Methodist congregation hall, with vibrant, bold colours and eclectic contemporary designs. Furniture, textiles, accessories and lighting are on show, flanked by art and plants. Talents include Henry Wilson, Noorstad, Frama, Muller Van Severen for valarie_objects, Dirk Van Der Kooij and Dinosaur Designs.
By appointment only, North London (15-21 September); for availability check here.

THE CONRAN SHOP
The Conran Shop hosts two cracking shows for LDF18. At the Marylebone Store, ‘The Conran Shop x Carl Hansen’ celebrates on-trend indigo, with exclusive editions of the Danish’s firm’s furniture transformed by the deep blue hue. Think Carl Hansen & Søn’s ‘CH4 Wishbone Chair’ by Hans Wegner with an indigo lacquer and Hiut denim seat pad. A stool and chair by Kaare Klint’s also get the denim treatment. At Chelsea’s Michelin House store ‘The Conran Shop x Pinterest’ features a maze of giant red pins, channelling the social media inspo site, while visitors can Pin and save products as they shop using an app and innovative Near Field technology microchips hidden in tags. Pincodes on display reveal the inspiration behind key designs.
The Conran Shop, 55 Marylebone High Street, Marylebone, London W1; Michelin House, 81 Fulham Road, London SW3 (both 15-23 September)

MATTER OF STUFF
Prepare to be transported by London design research gallery Matter of Stuff. In Kings Cross, their pop-up Concept Gallery at Fenman House has been designed by Raw Edges. Hung with wooden dowels suspended by blue string, the space celebrates materials, finishes and texture, including marble and ceramics. It’s the ideal backdrop to Matter of Stuff’s collection of furniture and lighting (by Bohinc Studio and Uufie) plus a curated mix of global brands including CC-Tapis, Made in Ratio and La Chance. Matter of Stuff also explores blown-glass at site-specific exhibition ‘Blown Away’ at Mayfair restaurant/bar Sketch. Don’t miss the new borosilicate glass ‘Bubble’ chandelier by master glassblower Simone Crestani. Magical.
Fenman House, 5 Lewis Cubitt Walk, Kings Cross, London N1; Sketch, 9 Conduit Street, London W1 (15-23 September)

The ARAM GALLERY
Covent Garden’s The Aram Gallery presents ‘Hilos Invisibles’, a collaboration between Montevideo-born designer Matteo Fogale and seven Uruguayan design studios, including furniture, lighting, mirrors and accessories in brass, glass, wood and concrete. Inspired by the work of modernist Uruguayan architect Julio Vilamajó – a design consultant on New York’s UN Headquarters with Le Corbusier and Oscar Niemeyer – the project was born of a 2017 residency and workshop at Montevideo’s Vilamajó House Museum, built by the architect in 1930, and draws on his architectural design details.
110 Drury Lane, Covent Garden, London WC2 (17 September-27 October)

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THE NEW CRAFTSMEN
A serene sanctuary, ‘The New Craftsmen x Malgorzata Bany’ offers zen time out from the frenzy of LDF18. Hosted by contemporary British crafts showroom The New Craftsmen in Mayfair, London-based, Slade-trained artist and designer Malgorzata Bany presents her collection of sculptural furniture, objects and table lights, including new additions to the popular range. Materials span Jesmonite, metal and handmade paper, with minimal yet organic forms. Bany also shares her edit of the store’s other makers. And breathe…
34 North Row, Mayfair, London W1 (15 and 17-22 September)

londondesignfestival.com

LDF 2018 – 10 Unmissable FizzPicks for London Design Biennale

London Design Biennale is a must for design hunters, bringing inspiring global ideas to Somerset House

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

One of our top tips for London Design Festival, London Design Biennale gathers creatives from 40 countries, cities and territories across six continents at Somerset House, all responding to 2018’s theme of ‘Emotional States’. Exploring ideas through design, architecture and technology – addressing social, political and environmental challenges – the second edition is a thought-provoking showcase, running until 23 September.

Influential museums and institutions are among the curators, including London’s V&A (‘Maps of Defiance’), New York’s Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum (‘Face Values’) and Milan’s Triennale (‘L’Architettura degli Alberi’). All the participants are worth a look, but here are 10 of our favourite FizzPicks…

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AUSTRALIA: ‘Full Spectrum’
London-based Australian designer Flynn Talbot channels Australia’s recent referendum vote to legalise same-sex marriage with vibrant light installation ‘Full Spectrum’. A celebration of diversity, the ecstatic, immersive work incorporates an arcing curve of rainbow colour, inspired by the Pride flag, embracing the whole spectrum. Its suspended light screen is formed from 150 strands of fibre-optic light, each a different hue, using custom-made hidden LED modules and electronics. You can touch and move through the strands or simply feel the love.


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LATVIA: ‘Matter to Matter’
Visitors can leave fleeting messages on a wall of condensation at Latvia’s entry ‘Matter to Matter’, designed by Arthur Analts of Variant Studio, which shares the emotional impact of mark making. Taking its cue from the Baltic state’s humid climate, with capital Riga surrounded by forests and the sea, it’s a statement about culture, transience and nature’s power to reclaim human traces. Each message lasts only a few minutes on the green glass surface, before fading away. Complete with a wooden bench, the simple, sensory space won ‘Best Design Medal’ at the Biennale.


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LEBANON: ‘The Silent Room’
Escape from city stress in ‘The Silent Room’, Lebanon’s blue-hued retreat from the pressures of public space. Enter the perforated brick-and-timber tower and a staircase leads to a dimly lit upper level. Within this fabric-lined, insulated cocoon, speakers play a field recording of quiet urban moments. ‘Silence is becoming a commodity for the privileged,’ says designer Nathalie Harb, whose private shelter offers ‘the luxury of silence to everyone, regardless of background or status.’ Influenced by her crowded home city Beirut, she hopes her soundscape provides a sensory respite from the madding crowd.


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INDIA: ‘State of Indigo’
We love blue, especially dreamy indigo, but the dark history of indigo farming has remained mysterious. India’s pavilion, backed by The Gujral Foundation, illuminates the ‘State of Indigo’, sharing the colonial slavery and contemporary social issues behind this emotionally charged pigment. A natural colour created from the indigofera plant, indigo was used ‘to dye fabric, repel insects, treat ailments, disinfect, ward off spirits and even decorate an entire city’, says curator Priya Khanchandani, who wants us to experience the working conditions behind this blue beauty.


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GUATEMALA: ‘Palopó’
Pattern and colour can transform lives and economies as ‘Palopó’, Guatemala’s pavilion, proves. It promotes a project to paint a whole town in vibrant hues, inspired by local, ancestral textile patterns, turning it into a vast artwork to attract tourism. Led by designer Diego Olivero of Olivero & Bland Studio, Pintando Santa Catarina Palopó aims to support an impoverished town on Lake Atitlán. The London installation celebrates this social design initiative, harnessing floating geometric forms resembling the multi-coloured houses, flanked by a textile mobile by Zyle.


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GREECE: ‘ΑΝΥΠΑΚΟΗ – Disobedience’
Championing the ancient Greek concept of civil disobedience, Greece’s kinetic ‘ΑΝΥΠΑΚΟΗ’ installation challenges our perception of static architecture. Designed by Nassia Inglessis-led Studio INI, its 17-metre-long wall is formed from a steel spring skeleton and recycled plastic, so it flexes and morphs around the human body. Visitors can enjoy the transgressive walkway, passing through the wall and feeling it respond in return. A boundary, but also a rebellious, exciting space to explore, it suggests a new, more dynamic shape for future city buildings.


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ITALY: ‘L’Architettura degli Alberi’
Based on a 20-year study of trees, Italian pavilion ‘L’Architettura degli Alberi’ reflects a labour of love by architects Cesare Leonardi and studio partner Franca Stagi. The duo documented Italy’s trees to help landscape designers, crafting accurate, beautifully detailed drawings of different trees at a 1:100 scale. Expanding to include European and Central American trees, the book was finally published in 1982, featuring 374 evocative illustrations of 211 species. This installation presented by La Triennale di Milano shares 24 of them, ideal for inspiring parks and public spaces.


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EGYPT: ‘Modernist Indignation’
Winner of the London Design Biennale 2018 Medal, Egypt’s display ‘Modernist Indignation’ charts the sad loss of the country’s once-vaunted modernist architecture, now left to rot or actively destroyed by critics. The pavilion is an elegy to that vulnerable and dying design language, featuring a contemporary reinterpretation of a fictional 1939 exhibition put on by Al Emara, the first Arabic design magazine (published from 1939 to 1959). It also includes a video shot in the house of its founding architect Sayed Karim, his manifesto and logo, gradually erased on the floor.


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SWEDEN: ‘Coal: Post-Fuel’
Coal could have emotional value, becoming a desirable design material, according to this intriguing Swedish exhibit by Jesper Eriksson. ‘Coal: Post Fuel’ considers an alternative future for this Industrial Age power source, imagining its life beyond a dirty fuel for burning. His installation features furniture, flooring and objects made from solid coal, some in their raw state and other pieces processed into a black marble-like finish. Eriksson reckons ‘Britain’s most iconic material’ can be rebranded for architecture and interior design. Think organic, quarried luxury…


THE NETHERLANDS: ‘Power Plant’
Fearful about food security and the future environment? Luckily, The Netherlands is on top of things, with its ‘Power Plant’ pavilion showing how design can solve the problem of population-pressured food production. A futuristic greenhouse, it uses sunlight to generate both food and the electricity needed to grow it. Designer Marjan van Aubel is behind this elegant solution, with the building’s transparent solar glass, hydroponic system, vertical growth structure and specifically coloured LEDs fostering a year-round, high-yield indoor harvest.


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Finally, don’t miss The Refugees’ Pavilion, a temporary shelter housing objects designed by displaced people. The pavilion itself is the ‘Better Shelter’, winner of the Design Museum’s Design of the Year 2016, a structure that unpacks from two cardboard boxes, and can be assembled by four people with one hammer in just a few hours. Inside, visitors can see how refugees worldwide have customised the flatpack making it their own. Social design in action.
www.londondesignbiennale.com

London Design Biennale is at Somerset House, Strand, London WC2 from 4 to 23 September 2018. Book tickets online or opt for a guided tour.

Photos: Mark Cocksedge (Australia Pavilion); Ed Reeve

LDF 2016 – V&A Top 5 FizzPicks

Five fizztastic must-see installations at the Victoria and Albert Museum during the London Design Festival

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

The world's leading museum of arts and design, the Victoria and Albert Museum – aka the V&A – is again a major hub for the London Design Festival, with a clutch of innovative installations on display from 17 to 25 September at the heart of the Brompton Design District.


'FOIL' by Benjamin Hubert
Large-scale immersive installation 'FOIL', by award-winning British designer Benjamin Hubert of Layer, is a 20-metre-long undulating ribbon-like dazzler in the V&A's softly lit Room 94. Surrounded by three 15th-century hunting tapestries, it's formed from 50,000 mirror-finish stainless-steel panels, attached by hand to neoprene sheets and lit by LED spots. Designed with German electronics whizz Braun and riffing on the foil-finish of next-gen shavers, the motor-powered creation produces a waving motion, accompanied by a fluid soundscape, reflecting magical light around the space. 'I want visitors to remember this sculptural landscape viscerally through their senses,' says Hubert. Think tapestry gone tech!


'The Green Room' by studio Glithero
Vibrant kinetic installation 'The Green Room' by studio Glithero (ex-RCA duo Dutch designer Sarah van Gameren and British talent Tim Simpson) is a monumental piece that challenges ideas of what a clock can be, crafted in partnership with luxury watchmaker Panerai. 'We wanted to create a time piece that people could be inside of,' says Simpson of the interactive design, which incorporates a cylindrical curtain of 160 multicoloured silicone cords wrapped around a six-storey domed stairwell. Each cord is attached to a central cam arm rotating at one revolution per minute, moving the cords up 2.5 metres and down again in a seductive parabolic motion. The resulting wave of mobile colour, glimpsed from different levels, is Instagram heaven!


'Liquid Marble' by Mathieu Lehanneur
A large slab of static black marble sculpted to channel the ocean's movement, 'Liquid Marble' by French multidisciplinary designer Mathieu Lehanneur puts you in a meditative mood. 'The piece doesn't move, but the reflection of light on the polished marble makes it feel like a real sea,' says Lehanneur. Capturing the ocean's waves with 3D software, the designer then machined a single block of jet-black marble to replicate the files before hand-polishing it. The result is a tranquil minimalist contrast to the ornate, gilded Norfolk House Music Room displayed in Room 52.


'Beloved' by Tabanlioglu Architects
Reflective installation 'Beloved' by Istanbul's Tabanlioglu Architects offers glimpses into the story of Madonna in a Fur Coat, a classic Turkish novel recently published in English. The 13-metre-long mirrored black box on a bridge allows you to peek inside cracks to view recreations of the novel in cinematic and physical form, including film, text, light and sound. From a distance it's just a dark box, but on closer examination it has a rich interior life, picking up on the book's theme of never judging by appearance. 'The installation is a physical, multi-sensory realisation of the way the human mind imagines scenes from a book as they read,' explain the architects.


Designer Souvenirs at the V&A Shop
Swing by the rated V&A Shop to scout out contemporary Designer Souvenirs by London designers celebrating the capital, displayed on a purpose-built sky-blue Corian cabinet by Loris&Livia. The quirky collection includes a London postcode clock and Cockney rhyming slang beer mats by Pentagram, and a graphic tubular striped matchbox and pencil also by Loris&Livia inspired by pedestrian crossing Belisha beacons. You can also snap up the range online.
londondesignfestival.com  vam.ac.uk

The London Design Festival exhibits at Victoria and Albert Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7, until 25 September 2016

Pictures: Mark Cocksedge (FOIL)

Vivid Sydney 2016

Bright-spark festival Vivid Sydney illuminates the city again, bringing lights, music, ideas and design to the party

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Vivid Sydney is back, bringing illumination and inspiration to the Harbour City. Whether you're into laser light shows, 3D-mapping projections, large-scale installations, edgy gigs or intriguing talks, you'll find something to entertain you in this ever-popular event, which this year offers an extended 23-night run until 18 June.

Exploring lights, music and ideas, Vivid is the largest festival of its kind, shining a light on the city's architecture and technology, and tapping into light-bulb thinking. Alongside the core precincts, 2016 sees three more districts added to the mix – Taronga Zoo, The Royal Botanic Garden Sydney and mall The Galeries – as well as an expanded number of venues and guest speakers. There's also a cluster of strong design dates for your diary. Here are our top festival tips...

ABOVE: Vivid Sydney's Harbour Lights with ferries and boats lit by LEDs; Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Opera House are also illuminated
BELOW: Sydney Opera House's 'Lighting the Sails: Songlines' projection including art by Donny Woolagoodja; Customs House; MCA; Cadmans Cottage; Circular Quay

Vivid Light: Core precincts
6pm-11pm (until 18 June)
Kick things off at Vivid's hub at Sydney Opera House and Circular Quay, with more than 60 cutting-edge lighting installations along the Vivid Light Walk, including major projections at the Customs House ('Sydney's Hidden Stories'), MCA ('The Matter of Painting') and Cadmans Cottage ('Impossible Voyage'). A wow this year is the 'Lighting The Sails, Songlines' at Sydney Opera House, which screens work by six artists from different Aboriginal clans onto the building's shells. From vibrant flora and fauna to black-and-white human figures and earthy brown palettes it's a strong statement, including work by Fizz favourite, street artist Reko Rennie. Keep going into The Rocks, Campbell's Cove and Walsh Bay for more, including luminescent laneway stunner 'Tectonic', formed from 1,500 suspended, upcycled PET bottles filled with tonic water. Harbour Lights sees boats and ferries lit up with LEDs, while for the first time many of the skyscrapers facing the Quay are given the colour-block lighting treatment ('Dress Circle'). Intel's 'Drone 100' will see 100 illuminated drones take to the skies for five nights only (8-12 June, 7.55pm), performing a colourful choreographed seven-minute routine over Sydney Harbour. Controlled by one main pilot, the bespoke animation will be set to music.

BELOW: Martin Place's 'Fountain' installation; Central Park beckons with a 'Silent Disco' and architectural projections

You can spy the towering columns of light created by 'Geometrics' from across town, let alone from beneath the kinetic sculpture at central-city precinct Martin Place; nearby 'Fountain' live-streams global birth data as 'human water droplets' to highlight our burgeoning 7.4 billion population. Further afield, Central Park teams a 'Silent Disco' with arty projections onto the former Carlton & United Brewery building in 'X Factory' (5.30pm-10pm). 


Vivid Light: Taronga Zoo
Bradleys Head Rd, Mosman (5.30pm-9.30pm, last entry 9pm, until 18 June)
Vivid's wildest new precinct for 2016 is Taronga Zoo, featuring 'Be the Light for the Wild', an illuminated trail of 10 critically endangered species from Australia and Sumatra, including the Asian elephant and platypus. Created by Ample Projects, the giant multimedia sculptures include interactive lighting, sound effects and moving parts, making them among the largest and most technologically advanced lanterns to appear at Vivid. A supporting cast of creatures, from an echidna to a crocodile and pygmy tarsiers, ups the cuteness ante. Pre-purchase tickets online ($17.95 adults, $11.95 kids aged 4-15); entry costs aid the conservation effort.

ABOVE: Animal lanterns at Sydney's Taronga Zoo, including a vibrant echidna, pygmy tarsiers and a crocodile


Vivid Light: The Royal Botanic Garden Sydney
Entry Queen Elizabeth II Gates via Opera House Forecourt (6pm-11pm, until 18 June)
A new precinct for 2016 is The Royal Botanic Garden Sydney, where trees and plants will be lit up with a magical cluster of light art for Vivid. Highlights include the glittering 'Cathedral Of Light', a sinuous long arched tunnel onlookers can walk through, framing views of the Opera House. Made up of thousands of dazzling LED lights, it takes its cue from the traditional arched windows of historic churches and is selfie heaven. Also look out for 3D-mapped fig tree projection 'Synthesis', interactive installation 'Sentiment Cocoon' and fantastical 'Will 'o the Wisps'.

ABOVE: The Royal Botanic Garden Sydney, featuring Vivid crowd favourite the arched 'Cathedral Of Light', tree projection 'Synthesis' and interactive experience 'Sentiment Cocoon'


Vivid Music: Björk
Carriageworks, 245 Wilson Street, Eveleigh (10am-6pm, 4-18 June)
Tickets for Björk's two DJ sets for the opening of 'Björk Digital' at Carriageworks (3 and 4 June) went quicker than a hot toddy in a Reykjavik bar, but you can still see the world premiere of her new touring virtual reality project, which takes over the evocative former rail yards until 18 June. Divided into five spaces and accompanied by collaborations with key filmmakers and programmers, the exhibition draws heavily on videos created for recent album 'Vulnicura' (above) and 'Biophilia', including immersive spaces, surround-sound and 360-degree film. 'I felt it was time to premiere my recent virtual reality stuff,' says Björk, 'We have made seven 360-degree videos for 'Vulnicura', and I am enthusiastic about this natural continuity of the music video; the intimacy, and total merge of surround-sound and vision, makes VR an ideal home.' It's free to attend, but book asap for the virtual reality rooms.


Vivid Music: New Order
Sydney Opera House (until 5 June)

New Order's four gigs at the Sydney Opera House, showcasing recent album 'Music Complete', may be sold out, but you can still see images of the band, including iconic portraits of their earlier incarnation as Joy Division, in a free photography exhibition in the Concert Hall Northern Foyers. By UK photographer Kevin Cummins, known for documenting the Manchester music scene, it runs until 5 June (6pm-late). The show is accompanied by artwork for the band by seminal British graphic designer Peter Saville, famous for setting the house style for Manchester's Factory Records label as their hugely influential art director. As part of Vivid's 'New Order Project', a talk with New Order in conversation with filmmaker/MFS label head Mark Reeder has just been announced for Friday 3 June (6.30pm, Playhouse); get in quick.

ABOVE: New Order plays the Opera House (photo, Nick Wilson)


ABOVE: Factory Design District in Waterloo showcases local talent and products, such as ISM Objects' 'Wink' table lamp, Studio Liam Mugavin's glass-topped 'Tangle' table and Boardgrove Architects' 'Two Tables'

Vivid Ideas: Factory Design District
901 Bourke Street, Waterloo (3-5 June, 11am to 6pm, 5pm and 4pm respectively)

Factory Design District takes over creative co-working space COMMUNE in Waterloo for three days, hosting industry talks, demonstrations and workshops, celebrating Australian design talent, the authentic and the handmade. Over 30 local designers, producers and makers are on board, with a curated exhibition including furniture by Jonathan West, bespoke joiner JP Finsbury, Boardgrove Architects and Studio Liam Mugavin, lighting by Abalos and accessories by The Fortynine.

Up-and-coming Thirroul-based designer Trent Jansen, who worked with Marcel Wanders, is speaking on Friday (4pm-5.30pm, ticketed), while established brand founders from Dinosaur Designs, TaitMUD Australia and ISM Objects give a talk Sunday (11.30am-1pm, ticketed), alongside a showcase of their recent designs. New Zealand lighting and furniture whizz David Trubridge discusses design copyright on Sunday (2pm-5pm), which is also market day with COMMUNE's Locally Made (11am-4pm) featuring some of Sydney's best inner-west makers across crafts, arts, fashion and music. See Factory Design District's own website for full details. Food and drink is local too, with contributions from Newtown's Young Henrys brewing co, Bloodwood and Continental Deli, St Peters' Urban Winery and Mecca Coffee.

Vivid Ideas: Design (various)
Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Level 6 Terrace Entrance (Circular Quay West Side)
The MCA is also hosting a few interesting design talks and interactive workshops, covering everything from humble design (7 June, 2pm-4pm) to 3D printing (8 June, 8am-10am) and the ethics of drones (8 June, 5pm-7pm). Check out Vivid's website for more events tackling architecture, digital design and so-now social media for your own lightbulb moment...

vividsydney.com
Vivid Sydney runs until 18 June 2016, with lights on from 6pm (usually until 11pm). Most of the public light art is free, but some events require booking or tickets. Lead image, Destination NSW