Melbourne Design Week 2019 – 6 Must-Sees

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This year’s Melbourne Design Week offers a thought-provoking mix of exhibitions, talks and tours. Take a peek…

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

2019’s Melbourne Design Week features more than 200 exhibitions, talks, tours, films and workshops, with events across town and in neighbouring city Geelong. Running from 14 to 24 March, Melbourne’s largest festival programme to date celebrates both local and international talent, with the core theme of ‘Design Experiments’ – asking how design can shape the future. A mix of ticketed and free activities embrace diverse challenges from the environment to social issues and materials. This year’s festival wraps up on Sunday, but many of the inspiring shows continue beyond the weekend. Here are six of our top FizzPicks…

‘SOMEWHERE OTHER’: JOHN WARDLE ARCHITECTS
Ground Level/Foyer, NGV Australia, Federation Square
Until 28 July (10am-5pm, free)

Visitors are invited to peek through five portals within timber and steel structure ‘Somewhere Other’, a compact, interactive experience by Melbourne practice John Wardle Architects. At NGV Australia until late July, this intriguing installation was first shown as part of 2018’s 16th International Architecture Exhibition at the Venice Architecture Biennale (pictured, top and above). Each of the wooden volumes, voids and apertures in its interconnected series frames views of the studio’s projects, the Australian landscape or the craft of collaborators including artist Natasha Johns-Messenger and filmmakers Coco and Maximilian.

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‘NEW VOLUMES BY ARTEDOMUS’: AN INSTALLATION BY FIONA LYNCH AND THOMAS COWARD
TDF Gallery, 14 Little Oxford Street, Collingwood
Until 24 March (11am-5pm, free)

We’re big fans of Artedomus’s ‘New Volumes’ collection, which showcases solid marble homewares by eight Australian designers. This Collingwood exhibition, curated by interior designer Fiona Lynch and designer Thomas Coward, represents the range in an installation that follows the journey of this sculptural material from the ‘ground to the house’, contrasted with a series of chunky marble plinths.

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‘MATERIAL THOUGHT’
Modern Times, 311 Smith Street, Fitzroy
Until 24 March (see link for times, free)

Presented by Fitzroy interiors store Modern Times, group exhibition ‘Material Thought’ explores material through the work of innovative Australian designers. On show are furniture, lighting and objects by nine top talents, including Henry Wilson (‘Stone Surface Sconce’, in Calacatta Marble, above), Coco Flip and Christopher Boots, all illuminating themes of design experimentation and sustainability.

’CLEMENT MEADMORE: THE ART OF MID-CENTURY DESIGN’
Ian Potter Museum of Art, University of Melbourne, Swanston Street
Until 24 March (see link for times, free)

Fans of modernism will enjoy exhibition ‘Clement Meadmore: The art of mid-century design’, a homage to the acclaimed Australian talent. The first major survey of Meadmore’s industrial design practice, it explores the inspirations that shaped the renowned sculptor’s early career as a designer. Part of a new wave of Australian design in the Fifties and Sixties, Meadmore championed streamlined forms, fresh materials and new manufacturing processes. His furniture and lighting appeared in the houses of iconic architect Robin Boyd, with well known designs such as his 1951 corded dining chair on view at the Ian Potter Museum of Art.

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‘WELCOME TO WASTELAND’
Compound Interest, 15-25 Keele Street, Collingwood
Until 24 March (11am-5pm, free)

Presented by Friends & Associates, ‘Welcome to Wasteland’ shares the work of cutting-edge local talents involved with sustainable design. Featuring architects, industrial designers, furniture makers and researchers, the show explores the potential of waste materials recycled into fresh, eco-friendly products. Typically innovative is Vert Design’s ‘HuskeeCup’ made from coffee husk waste, their collaboration with Spark & Burnish to craft ‘Marine Debris Bakelite Door Knobs’, and Maddison Ryder’s use of discarded Iceberg lettuce to form ‘Lettuce Eat’ disposable plates. Other materials in the mix include waste glass, ceramic, plastic, oyster shells, rubber bands, paper pulp, denim jeans, pigs’ blood and even golf balls!

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WORK SHOP: FIONA LYNCH
7 Glasshouse Road, Collingwood
Until 24 March (see link for times, free)

A curatorial showcase of experimental design, fine art and objects, interior designer Fiona Lynch’s new permanent gallery Work Shop aims to celebrate work by Australian and international designers and artists, as well as doubling as a testing ground for her own studio’s practice. For Melbourne Design Week, the debut show curates a selection of pieces examining the tension between resolved and incomplete elements, including ceramics by Olivia Walker (black porcelain collapsed vessel, above), burnt wood bowls by Makiko Ryujin, paintings by Jiaxin Nong and lighting design by Mary Wallis.

www.ngv.vic.gov.au/melbourne-design-week
Melbourne Design Week 2019 runs until Sunday 24 March at venues across the city and Geelong

Rigg Design Prize 2018

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2018’s inspiring Rigg Design Prize celebrates 10 of the best Australian interior design practices

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Interiors gets their hour in the sun at the 2018 Rigg Design Prize exhibition at Melbourne’s NGV Australia, which runs until 24 February 2019. Celebrating different contemporary design disciplines, the triennial prize focused on interior design and decoration for the first time in 2018, shortlisting 10 leading Australian practices. Each was tasked with creating a bespoke, purpose-built room in the gallery, responding to the theme of ‘Domestic Living’. The results are inspiring, suggesting fresh ways of inhabiting our homes, new trends and creative solutions to modern pressures. Even if you can’t get to Melbourne, check out our round up the 10 designs below…

HECKER GUTHRIE
Melbourne design practice Hecker Guthrie (aka Paul Hecker and Hamish Guthrie) bagged the AU$30,000 triennial prize for their graphic yet tactile installation ‘The table is the base’ (above). Riffing on the idea of the humble table, and its charismatic central role in domestic living spaces, the custom-made room plays with clean lines, form and scale. It explores the table as surface, support and enclosure. Judge Shashi Caan said, ‘Using only two elements – the simple form of the ‘Parsons’ table and terracotta as material – the project demonstrates the power of design restraint and curiosity at play.’


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MARTYN THOMPSON STUDIO
New York-based Australian photographer and designer Martyn Thompson’s space celebrates the ‘Atelier’, channelling the modern blurring of work and home life as an opportunity for creative expression. Bathed in light and shadow, his moody space features many of his own designs – including upholstery textiles, rugs, ottomans, wall treatments, ceramics, art and photos shown alongside collaborative, vintage, found and hand-crafted pieces. Even Thompson’s records, shoes and fleamarket finds make the cut. Clothes are hung like artworks and ambient music generates emotion. Flexible and ever-evolving, this is the home as heartland, layered, textural and deeply personal.


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DANIELLE BRUSTMAN
Like a chic spaceship or cool club, Danielle Brustman’s installation ‘Inner-Terior’ is somewhere we’d like to hang out. It helps that it stars a contemporary update of a cocooning, conversation pit and a futuristic record player (shown above right). A set designer before founding her Melbourne studio, Brustman drew on theatrical aesthetics for this curvy white space, edged with vibrant colour, glossy metallics and eye-catching illuminations. A lounge room that borrows from stage and spectacle, it takes its cues from Art Deco bandshells, European retro-futurist designs from the 60s, 80s movie Xanadu, rollerskating rinks and amusement rides. We reckon it’s 2001: A Space Odyssey gone domestic.


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THE SOCIETY INC BY SIBELLA COURT
Stylist and author Sibella Court, of Sydney interiors store The Society Inc, has always had a love affair with global curios, vintage finds, old tools, pirates and gypsies. For her Rigg Prize entry, dubbed the ‘Imaginarium’, she envisaged a space to ‘wonder, imagine, interact, research and create’. An entire home distilled into a single room, it feels darkly magical, with a rich mix of materials from pressed metal to wood and fabric. Layers of textures and colours, old and new, and real and imagined offer a modern take on a 16th-century ‘cabinet of curiosities’. The space celebrates craft, with displayed objects, including a striking feature wall, acting as a catalyst for memory and imagination. From an alchemy workshop to a ship’s crow’s nest, a bar, dress-up cupboard and pot-belly stove, it’s a mini world of wonders.


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RICHARDS STANISICH
Texture rules in the mesmerising tone-on-tone sculptural installation crafted by Richards Stanisich, titled ‘Our natural needs in a digital world’. The Sydney practice, established in 2018 by former SJB talents Jonathan Richards and Kirsten Stanisich, addresses our fundamental need for shelter, sanctuary, hygiene and intimacy and how it has been transformed by integrated technology and the Internet of Things. A central ochre living, sleeping and kitchen space champions the handmade, simple and earthy, with natural fabrics, ceramics and tiles. By contrast, it’s surrounded by black gloss tiles edged with blue light, representing the digital realm.


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FLACK STUDIO
Melbourne interior architecture firm Flack Studio has a way with vibrant colour, bold pattern and unexpected details, as seen in their striking portfolio of residential spaces, cafes, restaurants and boutiques. For the Rigg Prize, David Flack and his team ‘Flackify’ their living/dining space with saturated gold hues, luxe textures and quirky art and ornaments. ‘We’ve boundless plains to share’ references diversity and inclusion, creating an emotionally charged room for a golden age in Australia, encouraging collaboration and community.


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ARENT&PYKE
Elegance and beauty are at the heart of ‘Home: feast, bathe, rest’ by Sydney interior design studio Arent&Pyke (Juliette Arent and Sarah-Jane Pyke). The smartly zoned space combines areas for dining, washing and retreating, offering ideas for respite and emotional and physical wellbeing in a stressful world. Each area includes a contemporary Australian artwork and a bespoke piece of furniture, blending inspiring design-art with comforting, restorative simplicity.


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AMBER ROAD
Sydney interior design and landscape practice Amber Road’s seductive space ‘Take it outside’ is full of burnt colours, floaty textiles and dreamy desert and starlit views, centred around an inviting lounger. It celebrates the verandah or porch as a key transitional zone for relaxing and chatting together, especially in Australian homes. Principal designers and sisters Yasmine Ghoniem and Katy Svalbe spent time in the Middle East, as well as on their family farms in Australia, capturing this heritage in a beautifully crafted indoor-outdoor room.


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DAVID HICKS
Have homes become inner sanctums, fortresses or vessels for consumerist ideals? Melbourne- and LA-based David Hicks studio presents ‘Panic room’, combining Hicks’ trademark eye for luxe detail with lighting strung on chunky chains and threatening screens. It’s a slick satire on our panicked, media-saturated times, suggesting a life on stage, voyeuristic and yet paranoid about threats from outside. Has the aspirational ideal of a perfect life morphed into homes as psychological retreats and cocoons for self-protection?


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SCOTT WESTON ARCHITECTURE DESIGN
A sequence of six rooms forms ‘Wunderkammer’, an installation by Sydney-based Scott Weston Architecture Design which takes its cue from the renovation of Weston’s own Victorian Italianate terrace house, Villa Carmelina. Each contains a cabinet, or wunderkammer, featuring prized ‘jewels’, miniature artworks by favourite makers. An abstract representation of the house, it makes use of monochrome dioramas with coloured highlights and wallpaper vignettes or ornaments and collectibles.

Catch the Rigg Design Prize 2018 at Level 3, NGV Australia, Federation Square, Melbourne until Sunday 24 February 2019 (10am-5pm) or see the gallery’s website for a virtual tour and online interviews with the designers

William Eggleston Portraits

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Take inspiration from the colourful world of iconic US photographer William Eggleston

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

If you loved the vibrant palette of dreamy primary hues in movie 'La La Land' – which recently garnered directing, cinematography and production design Oscars – you'll be seduced by new exhibition 'William Eggleston Portraits' at Melbourne's National Gallery of Victoria. A pioneer of colour photography, acclaimed mid-century US photographer Eggleston's suburban Americana images from the Sixties and Seventies are peppered with cars, diners, petrol stations, supermarkets and street life, inspiring filmmakers David Lynch, the Coen Brothers, Gus Van Sant and especially Sofia Coppola, as well as contemporary snappers Martin Parr and Juergen Teller.

ABOVE: 'Untitled (Memphis, Tennessee)', c. 1969-71, dye-transfer print, by 'the godfather of colour photography' William Eggleston

ABOVE: 'Untitled', c.1965-8, dye-transfer print, printed 2004

The moment I first set eyes on Eggleston's arresting images, I was blown away by his rare talent for capturing standout colour, even in casual, momentary snaps (he was famous for only ever taking one shot). From a cobalt blue dress to a ruby red car, patterned orange woman's blouse or girl's long auburn hair, Eggleston sees colour like a painter, giving his documentary images a stylised, choreographed air. But these photos of family, friends, acquaintances and strangers are drawn from everyday life, not an art directed shoot or stage-managed ad campaign, finding beauty in the banal. At a time when black-and-white photography was considered more highbrow, groundbreaking Eggleston also experimented with dye-transfer printing, a commercial technique that produces highly colour-saturated imagery.

ABOVE: 'Untitled', c.1965-9, pigment print, printed 2016
BELOW: Installation views of 'William Eggleston Portraits' at the National Gallery of Victoria, including 'Untitled', 1974 (Biloxi, Mississippi); 'Untitled', c.1975 (Marcia Hare in Memphis, Tennessee)

Direct from London's National Portrait Gallery, the exhibition is on show until 18 June as part of the NGV Festival of Photography, featuring more than 100 works by Memphis-born Eggleston (1939-), including evocative images of the American South and never-before-seen shots of actor Dennis Hopper and The Clash frontman Joe Strummer. The head-turning colour combinations, such as Yves Klein blue and lemon yellow, or retro red and white stripes, could even give you fresh ideas for revving up your home...

ngv.vic.gov.au
'William Eggleston Portraits' is free at NGV International, 180 St Kilda Road, Melbourne, until 18 June 2017

Pictures: All William Eggleston images copyright Eggleston Artistic Trust; Sean Fennessy (installation views)

Melbourne Design Week 2017

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5 Top Tips for Melbourne Design Week

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

'What does design value, and how do we value design?' The inaugural Melbourne Design Week, running until 26 March 2017, tackles this topical question, with more than 100 citywide exhibitions, launches, workshops, tours and talks showcasing local and international talent. The first of four planned annual design weeks for the city, the 10-day festival is an initiative of the Victorian government curated by the National Gallery of Victoria, spanning iconic chairs, high-density apartments and indigenous design. Here are my five top FizzPicks...

ABOVE: Collingwood's 'Watchmaker' exhibition space, including surreal mirrored installations by Folk Architects, for Melbourne Design Week

CREATING THE CONTEMPORARY CHAIR

NGV International, 180 St Kilda Road
Until Sunday 26 March
Discover 35 inspiring seats at 'Creating the Contemporary Chair', spanning from 1980 to 2016, including designs by major names Tord Boontje, Konstantin Grcic and Patricia Urquiola. All recent NGV acquisitions, they include a stool coated in volcanic rock and a suspended chair resembling a killer whale.

ABOVE: Installation view of 'Creating the Contemporary Chair', The Gordon Moffatt Gift, at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, including Jacopo Foggini's LED-lit 'Alice' armchair for Edra


WATCHMAKER


Piccolina Gelateria, 296 Smith Street, Collingwood
Until Sunday 26 March

A derelict historic Collingwood watchmaker's shop gets a minimal mirrored makeover by local studio Folk Architects in pop-up satellite space 'Watchmaker', which hosts six shows. Friends & Associates invites 26 Australian designers – including Tomek Archer, Tom Fereday and Ross Gardam – to reconfigure replicas of Jasper Morrison's oft-copied 'Hal' chair for Vitra in '26 Original Fakes', celebrating authenticity in a murky world of fakes. Hub Furniture's Jaci Foti-Lowe curates 'The Found Object', sharing inspirational pieces collected by Melbourne creatives.

In 'Undervalued' Australian designer Nick Rennie champions beautiful, useful designs costing up to $2, £2 or ¥2. Egg forms are explored in 'Ovoid', fine-art photos shot by Nick Horan. Interactive installation 'Apparatus 4' by 227768c is animated by an algorithm which causes its inflatable surface to undulate. Short film 'Untitled (with Gelato)', by Coco and Maximilian, looks at the design arc of relationships.

ABOVE: Converted store space 'Watchmaker', including Smith Street exterior; and installation views of '26 Original Fakes', presented by Friends & Associates, which riffs on replica chairs; Hub Furniture's curated exhibition 'The Found Object' showcasing creative collections; Nick Horan's 'Ovoid' egg photos; and interactive blue floor surface 'Apparatus 4' by 227768c


MODERN FORMS

NGV Design Store, NGV International, 180 St Kilda Road
Until Sunday 26 March

From Brutalist Polish churches to Oscar Niemeyer's uncompleted designs for Lebanon's International Fairgrounds (interrupted by civil war), 'Modern Forms' recalls the architecture of post-war modernism. Warsaw-based Nicolas Grospierre's shots capture the sculptural, geometric nature of these unfamiliar works.

ABOVE: Nicolas Grospierre's photos for 'Modern Forms' include this 2012 shot of 'Bus Stop #4, Crimea, Ukraine' reflecting Soviet architecture


DESIGNWORK 01

Sophie Gannon Gallery, 2 Albert Street, Richmond
Until Saturday 25 March
Sophie Gannon Gallery presents contemporary Australian design at 'Designwork 01'. The sleek space showcases 10 designers, including Trent Jansen's sculptural Indian-inspired stools and vessels, David Mutch's acrylic leaning lamps, Ash Allen's recycled cork and tyre stools, and Dale Hardiman's 'Wood Is Made From Trees' customised timber IKEA 'Frost' stools, clad with native paperbark used by the indigenous Wurundjeri.

ABOVE: Ash Allen's ceramic 2013 'Dollop' pendant lights part of group show 'Designwork 01' at Sophie Gannon Gallery


VICTORIA TASMANIA GRADUATE OF THE YEAR AWARD 2016

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Brickworks, 490 Swan Street, Richmond
Saturday 25 March

Catch the work of local young designers from two states at the Victoria Tasmania Graduate of the Year Award 2016, presented by the Design Institute of Australia, which features furniture, industrial and interior design, as well as visual communications, textiles, fashion and jewellery.
ngv.vic.gov.au

ABOVE: Next-gen design talent on display at the Victoria Tasmania Graduate of the Year Award
Pictures: Tobias Titz, Wayne Taylor, Jeremy Dillon

Five Must-Sees at Melbourne's NGV

In the mood for a culture hit? We share five FizzPicks from Melbourne's National Gallery of Victoria, including fashion, architecture and art...

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Melbourne's National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) has a flock of fascinating shows and installations on this season, from radical fashion to architecture, design and art. We share five of the best current must-sees below. For future diary dates, make plans to catch US photography exhibition 'William Eggleston Portraits' (17 March-18 June 2017) and major draw 'The House of Dior: Seventy Years of Haute Couture' (27 August-7 November 2017).
ngv.vic.gov.au

ABOVE: Australian Islamic Centre, Newport, Melbourne, by Glenn Murcutt


VIKTOR&ROLF: Fashion Artists
Until 26 February 2017
Radical Dutch fashion duo Viktor&Rolf's surreal creations get their first Australian airing in 'Viktor&Rolf: Fashion Artists'. Exploring their love affair with wearable art, the exhibition includes more than 40 haute couture and ready-to-wear looks, many verging on the sculptural with 3D details. Dollphobics look away, as there are also 21 handmade Belgian dolls sporting ensembles. A video gallery of runway footage brings the pair's performance-art-inspired catwalk shows to life. Children will love separate interactive installation 'Atelier: Viktor&Rolf For Kids'.

ABOVE: Chromogenic print Heather Marks by David LaChapelle, 'The House at the End of the World', 2015, featuring Viktor&Rolf 'Bedtime Story RTW collection A/W 2005, published in Vogue Italia, October 2015; Viktor&Rolf 'Wearable Art' haute couture collection, A/W 2015-16


GLEN MURCUTT: Architecture of Faith
Until 19 February 2017
Known for his environmentally conscious, locally sensitive designs, Glenn Murcutt turned 80 recently, but this hugely influential Australian architect is still making waves. NGV exhibition 'Glenn Murcutt: Architecture of Faith' delves into one of his most inspiring recent projects, the new Australian Islamic Centre at Newport, Melbourne, created with practice Elevli Plus. Defining a new language for contemporary Australian Islam, the building respects traditional mosque architecture while bravely pushing the boundaries in terms of geometry, colour and materials.

ABOVE: Australian Islamic Centre, detail of minaret wall; Elevated roof detail showing lantern layout, Australian Islamic Centre, Newport, 2016, designed by Glenn Murcutt AO in collaboration with Elevli Plus


2016 NGV ARCHITECTURE COMMISSION: M@Studio Architects
Until April 2017
We told you pink was trending! This playful pink reimagining of a suburban car wash has taken over the NGV's Grollo Equiset Garden. The 2016 NGV Architecture Commission, it was designed by local M@Studio Architects and modelled on the dimensions of a real car wash. Made of lightweight steel with cricket-netting walls and a translucent polycarbonate roof, it sports five bays of hot pink AstroTurf with rubberised humps and road markings. Illuminated at night with a sparkly 'car wash' sign, it hosts talks, live music and events, with two lanes diffusing cooling mist.

ABOVE: 'Haven't you always wanted...?', M@Studio Architects car wash installation for the 2016 NGV Architecture Commission


JEPPE HEIN: Semicircular Space
Until 26 February 2017

A disorientating maze of reflective stainless steel, 'Semicircular Space' by Danish-born, Berlin-based contemporary artist Jeppe Hein is a striking, immersive installation in NGV International's central Federation Court. Shaped like a sinuous nautilus, it's proving an Instagram favourite.

ABOVE: Installation view of Jeppe Hein's 'Semicircular Space', 2016


JOHN OLSEN: The You Beaut Country
Until 12 February 2017
Major Australian art exhibition 'John Olsen: The You Beaut Country' celebrates one of the country's greatest living artists, aged 88, known for his wonderful ways with colour, fluid form and grand scale. Featuring Olsen's 'You beauty country' series begun in the 1960s and inspired by Australian landscape and nature, as well as more recent prints, paintings and watercolours (including some representing Lake Eyre's return from drought), it's pure palette pleasure.

ABOVE: 'Seafood paella' oil on plywood, 2007, John Olsen, private collection


The Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia is at Federation Square; nearby NGV International is at 180 St Kilda Road, Melbourne; see website for locations of specific shows

Photos: Viktor&Rolf (David LaChapelle; Team Peter Stigter); Glenn Murcutt (Tobias Titz), copyright held by G. Murcutt on all mosque drawings and designs; NGV Architecture Commission (Peter Bennetts); Jeppe Hein (Courtesy König Galerie, Berlin, Nicholai Wallner Gallery, Copenhagen, and 303 Gallery, New York; John Olsen (Administered by Viscopy, Sydney)