Sydney Design Festival 2019 – 5 Must-Sees

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Sydney Design Festival 2019 brings inspiring exhibitions, talks and workshops to town. Here are five Fizz faves for getting your design on!

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Sydney Design Festival is back for 2019, unpacking new design, sharing emerging and established talents, and tackling design challenges. This year’s theme is ‘Accessing Design’, making design accessible to fresh audiences, with the action spread beyond the obvious inner-city hot spots. Running from 1 to 10 March – but with many shows lasting longer – the festival also shines a light on local design, including indigenous creativity, hosting events from exhibitions to talks, workshops, open studios, screenings and parties. Here are five of our #SDF19 Fizz faves…

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TOP: Sydney Design Festival keynote speaker Rachel Wingfield of Loop.pH with a range of dynamic past projects. ABOVE: Loop.pH’s ‘Arborescence’ installation for 2014’s Amsterdam Light Festival, proposing a future hybrid of trees and street lighting harnessing the studio’s signature bio-luminescence. Think sustainable ‘living lighting’

FESTIVAL KEYNOTE: RACHEL WINGFIELD OF LOOP.PH
Powerhouse Museum, 500 Harris Street, Ultimo
8 March (6pm-8pm)

London designer Rachel Wingfield, co-founder with Mathias Gmachl of Loop.pH, will give the festival keynote speech at Ultimo’s Powerhouse Museum. Launched in 2003, their spatial laboratory is known for cross-disciplinary designs that combine digital, light, art and craft details, often in public spaces. Exploring design, architecture and science, Loop.pH’s intriguing installations and experiences harness diverse materials from LEDs, electro-luminous fibres and NASA’s reflective silver mylar to carbon, bamboo and algae. Buy tickets to the talk online or check out Wingfield’s collaborative workshop ‘Archilace’ on Sunday 10 March (3pm-5pm).

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ABOVE: Mungo Scott Flour Mill, historic home to authentic Australian design showcase ‘Home.Grown’ in Summer Hill

HOME.GROWN//DISCOVERING AUSTRALIAN DESIGN
Mungo Scott Flour Mill, 2 Smith Street, Summer Hill
8-10 March

A three-day celebration of Australian furniture, lighting and home furnishings, ‘Home.Grown’ is presented by the Authentic Design Alliance and curated by its director Anne-Maree Sargeant. Expect three halls over two levels featuring exhibitions, installations and pop-ups, championing locally designed and made products and homegrown talents. All up you’ll discover around 175 designers and 100 brands. Ground Floor Hall 1 features a combined showcase of designers and smaller independent brands, spanning innovative lighting by Lumil, rugs by Designer Rugs and stylish storage by Sagitine, alongside a pop-up mini mart of Australian homewares available to buy from top3 by design. Installations occupy Ground Floor Hall 2, including ‘Undervalued’ by Nick Rennie, ‘Project Replica’ by Mitch Tobin, ‘Brand a Fake’ by ADA, ‘Used by 3018’ by Will Thompson, a Mercedes-Benz Design Award display and atmospheric photos of the historic venue itself. Upstairs, the First Floor Gallery presents curated zones by 10 established Australian design brands, including Nau, Catapult, Didier, Furnished Forever and Artedomus (‘New Volumes’). Talks, starring talents including Adam Goodrum, Adam Cornish and Christina Bricknell, tackle issues affecting the country’s design scene. The location is a wow too, with the event taking over the 1922 Mungo Scott Flour Mill. A free preview afternoon on Friday 8 March is by RSVP only; for the weekend, buy advance tickets cheaper online or snap them up at the door.

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ABOVE: Trent Jansen’s ‘Tidal Lounger’ chairs and ‘Tidal Coffee Table’, made from premium stainless steel wire for Australian outdoor living brand Tait, feature in ADC’s exhibition ‘Steel’

STEEL: ART DESIGN ARCHITECTURE
Australian Design Centre, 101-115 William Street, Darlinghurst
Until 3 April (closed Sundays and Mondays)

Discover the innovative ways artists, designers and architects are using steel in the 21st century at this major touring exhibition from Adelaide’s JamFactory. Free to visit at Darlinghurst’s Australian Design Centre, it showcases the work of 29 Australian creatives, including Korban/Flaubert’s bold steel sculptures, Trent Jansen’s wave-inspired ‘Tidal’ outdoor furniture collection for Tait, and BVN’s graphic Australian PlantBank research building at Mount Annan in New South Wales. A selection of steely works is also displayed across the road at Stylecraft’s showroom (24/100 William Street). Fancy some craft shopping? ADC hosts a Makers Market on Saturday 9 March (10am-4pm), featuring more than 27 local makers.

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ABOVE: ‘Purple with Black, White and Blue’ photo (detail) by Jon Setter, part of the artist’s exhibition ‘The Urban Text’ at design store Koskela

JON SETTER: THE URBAN TEXT
Koskela, 1/85 Dunning Avenue, Rosebery
Until 31 March

This series of 12 minimal photographs explores the unnoticed aspects of urban environments and our everyday streetscapes. Detroit-born, Sydney-based Jon Setter’s free exhibition ‘The Urban Text’ is on show at inspiring design store Koskela in Rosebery, so call in for a culture fix, then stick around to shop for Australian-made furniture, homewares and accessories. The artworks are available to buy as unframed prints in three sizes, and their abstract, graphic, simple, colour-block style will look a treat on your wall. Feeling peckish? Three Blue Ducks cafe shares this atmospheric former factory space.

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ABOVE: Bernabei Freeman’s contemporary ceramic ‘Hybrid Vessel’ (2018), incorporating 3D-printed ABS and handwoven rattan, is part of digital craft show ‘Femufacture’ at The Japan Foundation

FEMUFACTURE: JAPANESE AND AUSTRALIAN DESIGN
The Japan Foundation Gallery, Level 4, Central Park, 28 Broadway, Chippendale
Until 30 March (closed Sundays)

Lovers of craft and design will enjoy cutting-edge exhibition ‘Femufacture’, which explores the interface of craft traditions and digital fabrication technologies. Hosted by The Japan Foundation Gallery, upstairs in Chippendale’s Central Park mall, it features new works by Japanese and Australian women including 3D-printed ceramic and hand-woven rattan vessels by Melbourne’s Bernabei Freeman (Rina Bernabei and Kelly Freeman). Mediums include weaving, wood turning, indigo-dyeing, paper cut, silversmithing and knitting, combined with 3D printing, CNC machining, coding and robotics. The show also includes wearable technology by light artist Erina Kashihara, who joins the gallery’s free panel discussion to mark International Women’s Day (8 March, 6.30pm-8pm).

sydneydesign.com.au/2019

Sydney Design Festival 2019 runs until Sunday 10 March at venues across the city, but many events continue beyond this weekend. For more inspiration check out SDF’s suggested itineraries, from free and family-friendly ideas to sustainable thinking and design after dark.

Melbourne Design Week 2017

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5 Top Tips for Melbourne Design Week

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

'What does design value, and how do we value design?' The inaugural Melbourne Design Week, running until 26 March 2017, tackles this topical question, with more than 100 citywide exhibitions, launches, workshops, tours and talks showcasing local and international talent. The first of four planned annual design weeks for the city, the 10-day festival is an initiative of the Victorian government curated by the National Gallery of Victoria, spanning iconic chairs, high-density apartments and indigenous design. Here are my five top FizzPicks...

ABOVE: Collingwood's 'Watchmaker' exhibition space, including surreal mirrored installations by Folk Architects, for Melbourne Design Week

CREATING THE CONTEMPORARY CHAIR

NGV International, 180 St Kilda Road
Until Sunday 26 March
Discover 35 inspiring seats at 'Creating the Contemporary Chair', spanning from 1980 to 2016, including designs by major names Tord Boontje, Konstantin Grcic and Patricia Urquiola. All recent NGV acquisitions, they include a stool coated in volcanic rock and a suspended chair resembling a killer whale.

ABOVE: Installation view of 'Creating the Contemporary Chair', The Gordon Moffatt Gift, at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, including Jacopo Foggini's LED-lit 'Alice' armchair for Edra


WATCHMAKER


Piccolina Gelateria, 296 Smith Street, Collingwood
Until Sunday 26 March

A derelict historic Collingwood watchmaker's shop gets a minimal mirrored makeover by local studio Folk Architects in pop-up satellite space 'Watchmaker', which hosts six shows. Friends & Associates invites 26 Australian designers – including Tomek Archer, Tom Fereday and Ross Gardam – to reconfigure replicas of Jasper Morrison's oft-copied 'Hal' chair for Vitra in '26 Original Fakes', celebrating authenticity in a murky world of fakes. Hub Furniture's Jaci Foti-Lowe curates 'The Found Object', sharing inspirational pieces collected by Melbourne creatives.

In 'Undervalued' Australian designer Nick Rennie champions beautiful, useful designs costing up to $2, £2 or ¥2. Egg forms are explored in 'Ovoid', fine-art photos shot by Nick Horan. Interactive installation 'Apparatus 4' by 227768c is animated by an algorithm which causes its inflatable surface to undulate. Short film 'Untitled (with Gelato)', by Coco and Maximilian, looks at the design arc of relationships.

ABOVE: Converted store space 'Watchmaker', including Smith Street exterior; and installation views of '26 Original Fakes', presented by Friends & Associates, which riffs on replica chairs; Hub Furniture's curated exhibition 'The Found Object' showcasing creative collections; Nick Horan's 'Ovoid' egg photos; and interactive blue floor surface 'Apparatus 4' by 227768c


MODERN FORMS

NGV Design Store, NGV International, 180 St Kilda Road
Until Sunday 26 March

From Brutalist Polish churches to Oscar Niemeyer's uncompleted designs for Lebanon's International Fairgrounds (interrupted by civil war), 'Modern Forms' recalls the architecture of post-war modernism. Warsaw-based Nicolas Grospierre's shots capture the sculptural, geometric nature of these unfamiliar works.

ABOVE: Nicolas Grospierre's photos for 'Modern Forms' include this 2012 shot of 'Bus Stop #4, Crimea, Ukraine' reflecting Soviet architecture


DESIGNWORK 01

Sophie Gannon Gallery, 2 Albert Street, Richmond
Until Saturday 25 March
Sophie Gannon Gallery presents contemporary Australian design at 'Designwork 01'. The sleek space showcases 10 designers, including Trent Jansen's sculptural Indian-inspired stools and vessels, David Mutch's acrylic leaning lamps, Ash Allen's recycled cork and tyre stools, and Dale Hardiman's 'Wood Is Made From Trees' customised timber IKEA 'Frost' stools, clad with native paperbark used by the indigenous Wurundjeri.

ABOVE: Ash Allen's ceramic 2013 'Dollop' pendant lights part of group show 'Designwork 01' at Sophie Gannon Gallery


VICTORIA TASMANIA GRADUATE OF THE YEAR AWARD 2016

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Brickworks, 490 Swan Street, Richmond
Saturday 25 March

Catch the work of local young designers from two states at the Victoria Tasmania Graduate of the Year Award 2016, presented by the Design Institute of Australia, which features furniture, industrial and interior design, as well as visual communications, textiles, fashion and jewellery.
ngv.vic.gov.au

ABOVE: Next-gen design talent on display at the Victoria Tasmania Graduate of the Year Award
Pictures: Tobias Titz, Wayne Taylor, Jeremy Dillon

At Home: Modern Australian Design

Sydney's Old Government House has been given a magical contemporary twist with 'At Home', an inspired exhibition of modern Australian design

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

We love a ramble through a stately home, but for antiques plus attitude don't miss brilliant show 'At Home: Modern Australian Design', taking over Sydney's Old Government House in Parramatta until 22 January 2017. Hosted by the National Trust and curated by eagle-eyed design editor David Clark (who formerly helmed Vogue Living), it places hand-picked contemporary objects by over 60 of the country's leading designers cheek-by-jowl with historic pieces, exploring the nation's domestic aesthetics. The result is a marriage made in style heaven, with cutting-edge furniture, lighting, textiles, wallpaper and accessories both complementing and contrasting with the original interiors, making you look at them in a fabulously fresh light.

TOP: Adam Goodrum's vibrant aluminium 'Stitch' chair (2008) for Cappellini beside his wood and Marbro 'Broached Colonial Birdsmouth' table (2011) for Broached Commissions in the Old Government House dining room. Vert Design's 2016 digitally modelled, milky-white versions of Lucien Henry's 19th-century 'Waratah' decanter and 'Protea' cups perch on the table

ABOVE: Sarah King's leather-like carbon-fibre 'Carbon Wingback' chair (2009) in the governor's office, flanked by Daniel Emma's mixed-media 'D.E Desk' accessories (2010). Laundry marker on lino artwork 'The day a white man gave a black man (his) land' (2006) by Joan Ross hangs on the wall

For an atmospheric arrival, take the ferry from Circular Quay up the Parramatta River, then walk to leafy Parramatta Park where Old Government House oozes venerable charm. The 'country home' of the first 10 governors of New South Wales, from 1799 to 1855, it's Australia's oldest surviving public building, a convict-built World Heritage site and host to a significant collection of late Georgian furniture. But the period drama really amps up once you go inside, with the exhibition's subtle and striking juxtapositions of iconic, recent and new Australian designs inserted into hallways, lounges, dining room, bedrooms and even the kitchen. 'I hope it demonstrates the more expressive edge of contemporary Australian design,' says Clark. 'The hybrids and curiosities, the bespoke and beautiful, the exuberant, quirky and odd.'

ABOVE: Louise Olsen's handmade resin 'Liquid Moon' side table (2016) in 'Seaweed Malachite' for Dinosaur Designs, with toile artwork by Cloth's Julie Paterson; Korban/Flaubert's sculptural stainless steel 'Armour' screen (2012) in the hall, complemented by chequered floors

The kernel for the show sprang from the 2011 'Broached Colonial' collection by Melbourne design studio Broached Commissions, which included work by Adam Goodrum, Charles Wilson and Trent Jansen and riffed on colonial Australia. Clark was keen to see the pieces in the context of Old Government House, alongside other modern designs. While some contemporary items have a colonial feel – from decanters and tea sets to sleekly crafted wooden chairs – others are digitally produced, streamlined products that bring 21st-century bang to the building's vintage buck, or draw on radical materials including salvaged car parts, carbon fibre and glossy resin.

ABOVE: Curves in all the right places – created especially for the exhibition Fred Ganim's Belgian oak 'Plane' table (2016), with Japanese black stain, sits below the swirling staircase

An impressive roll call of local talent is on display, from Adam Goodrum's laser-cut, folding 'Stitch' chair, designed in 2008 for Italian brand Cappellini, to Grant and Mary Featherston's vintage 'Scape' armchair from 1960, reissued in 2016 by Grazia & Co. Established pieces by Marc NewsonRobert Foster and Dinosaur Designs are here, alongside newer creations by up-and-coming names. We love Adelaide duo Daniel Emma's 'D.E Desk' accessories, Henry Wilson's bronze 'Fin' bookends, 'Stack' trays and 'Surface' sconce lamps, and Trent Jansen's terracotta 'Jugaad with Pottery' vessels, created in India.

ABOVE: Broached Commissions' 'Piano' credenza (2013) by Adam Goodrum, made from piano ivory, timber and felt, sheet music and Victorian ash, with Charles Wilson's Tasmanian blackwood 'Government' side table (2007); The sci-fi shape of Marc Newson's tubular steel, foam and wool 'Embryo' chair (1988) contrasts with its heritage surrounds

Like a sinuous racetrack, Fred Ganim's undulating 'Plane' table occupies a startling location in the atrium, below the two-story building's curvy wooden staircase. Taking the spot usually occupied by a hurricane lantern by the hall's entry portico, ADesignStudio's 'Greenway' pendant lamp teams classic hand-blown glass and brass with 3D-printed polymers and LED lights, typifying the collision of old and new in the show. Another heavenly hybrid is the 'Waratah' decanter and 'Protea' cups, originally drawn by Lucien Henry (1889-91) but digitally remodelled by Vert Design in 2016, using 3D-printed polymers. Australia's decorative past meets its high-tech future...

ABOVE: Culture-clash rules in the upstairs lounge, decorated with terracotta 'Jugaad with Pottery' by Trent Jansen, 'Matisse' chairs by Frag Woodall, brass 'Don' coffee table by Don Cameron and zig-zag LED 'Sen' light by Liam Mugavin, all 2016; In the music room, Tony Kenway's maple 'Signature' rocker (1988) and Lucy McRae's vegetable-dyed wood and metal 'Broached Colonial Prickly' lamp (2011) for Broached Commissions add a slightly surreal touch

Lovers of wallpapers and fabrics should head upstairs, where prints and textiles draped on tables and tacked to walls include work by Anna Spiro (behind the interiors of Australia's Halcyon House hotel), Oscar-winning costume designer Catherine Martin, flora and fauna-inspired Cloth (aka Julie Paterson), photographer Martyn Thompson, painterly Shilo Engelbrecht, and nature-influenced Utopia Goods. There's a compact design store and alfresco cafe for shopping and sipping afterwards. The Fizz heard a rumour that the upstairs lounge is haunted, but there's not a ghost of a chance that would put us off this thought-provoking show!
nationaltrust.org.au/event/at-home
'At Home: Modern Australian Design' is at Old Government House, Parramatta Park, Parramatta, western Sydney, until 22 January 2017. Open Tue-Sun, 10am-4pm (last admission 3.30pm); AU$18.50 for adult tickets, online or on the door.

Pictures: Michael Wee

The Big Design Market Sydney

Need gift inspiration? Check out The Big Design Market in Sydney

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Christmas shopping can be inspiring and support design talent too. For the first time, The Big Design Market brings more than 200 independent Australian and international designers together for three days of stylish shopping in Sydney, running from Friday 25 to Sunday 27 November at Moore Park's Royal Hall of Industries. The market then moves on to Melbourne (2-4 December), where it has proved a hit in recent years. Crafts, homewares, lighting, fashion, jewellery, lifestyle accessories, stationery and kids' kit are all in the mix, with a different line-up for each city and a focus on original, quality and sustainable products.

ABOVE: Sydney's line-up includes Bridget Bodenham's handmade ceramics; Robyn Wood's tulip-inspired timber and bonded parchment 'Bud' table lamp; Fictional Objects' soft-finish cotton bed linen sports minimal patterns

Some of our fave FizzPicks for Sydney include Bridget Bodenham's graphic, textured ceramic tableware; Angus & Celeste's quirky hanging planters; Skimming Stones' Australian-inspired porcelain; and artists Rowena Martinich and Geoffrey Carran of Martinich&Carran's painterly plates. Fictional Objects designs subtly contemporary bed linen. For cool jewellery, don't miss A Skulk of Foxes and Emily Green's pastel-pretty pieces. Trent Jansen's 'Cyclesign' bicycle wheel reflectors, made out of recycled road signs and bike tubes, are eco-friendly stocking fillers.

ABOVE: Angus & Celeste's hanging 'Jelly' planters; 'Original Dutch' paper origami shade by Studio Snowpuppe from Paper Empire Australia; handmade 'Lion Snuggle' cushion and 'Elfie Elephant' soft toy from Miann & Co; 'Hydrangea Mixed Bead' necklace by Emily Green, featuring hand-formed polymer clay and rectangular brass beads

Creative types can get involved in workshops, with sessions on personalised colour palettes hosted by Sydney stylist supreme Sibella Court (known for her innovative hotel, bar and restaurant interiors, and inspirational shop The Society Inc. in St Peters). Melbourne illustrator Beci Orpin will also be teaching you how to design your own block printing stamps. Children can enjoy free kids' activities, plus a magical hand-painted forest play area by author/illustrator Penny Ferguson of Min Pin. This year's guest artist is renowned paper artist Benja Harney of Paperform, who will craft a colourful large-scale installation. 

ABOVE: Hand-painted ceramic platter by artists Martinich&Carran; artwork by illustrator Beci Orpin; cute paper works by Enemies Yay (illustrators Laura Blythman and Pete Cromer); 'Ice Cream Bicycle Bell' by Beep Bicycle Bells; Sydney distillery Archie Rose will be mixing vodka, gin and white rye cocktails at the market

You won't go home hungry with some of Sydney's finest food and drink purveyors setting up shop at the market. Mary's, Porteño, Smoking Gun Bagels and Taco Truck will be dishing up food, with sweet treats by Gelato Messina and All Day Donuts, and drinks by Tasmania's Moo Brew, Lunar Wines and Archie Rose Distillery, among others. Early birds can scoop designer showbags, limited to 300 a day, and filled with over $120 worth of treats from stallholders (just $15 each).

ABOVE: Stylist Sibella Court, with Instagram-friendly interiors from her Sydney store The Society Inc., just one of the talents hosting creative workshops

sydney.thebigdesignmarket.com
The Big Design Market is at Royal Hall of Industries, Errol Flynn Blvd, Moore Park, Sydney, from 25-27 November 2016; Fri 10am-9pm, Sat 10am-7pm, Sun 10am-5pm; adults $2, free for kids 12 and under. See our follow-up post for more on Melbourne's market from 2-4 December 2016

Vivid Sydney 2016

Bright-spark festival Vivid Sydney illuminates the city again, bringing lights, music, ideas and design to the party

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Vivid Sydney is back, bringing illumination and inspiration to the Harbour City. Whether you're into laser light shows, 3D-mapping projections, large-scale installations, edgy gigs or intriguing talks, you'll find something to entertain you in this ever-popular event, which this year offers an extended 23-night run until 18 June.

Exploring lights, music and ideas, Vivid is the largest festival of its kind, shining a light on the city's architecture and technology, and tapping into light-bulb thinking. Alongside the core precincts, 2016 sees three more districts added to the mix – Taronga Zoo, The Royal Botanic Garden Sydney and mall The Galeries – as well as an expanded number of venues and guest speakers. There's also a cluster of strong design dates for your diary. Here are our top festival tips...

ABOVE: Vivid Sydney's Harbour Lights with ferries and boats lit by LEDs; Sydney Harbour Bridge and the Opera House are also illuminated
BELOW: Sydney Opera House's 'Lighting the Sails: Songlines' projection including art by Donny Woolagoodja; Customs House; MCA; Cadmans Cottage; Circular Quay

Vivid Light: Core precincts
6pm-11pm (until 18 June)
Kick things off at Vivid's hub at Sydney Opera House and Circular Quay, with more than 60 cutting-edge lighting installations along the Vivid Light Walk, including major projections at the Customs House ('Sydney's Hidden Stories'), MCA ('The Matter of Painting') and Cadmans Cottage ('Impossible Voyage'). A wow this year is the 'Lighting The Sails, Songlines' at Sydney Opera House, which screens work by six artists from different Aboriginal clans onto the building's shells. From vibrant flora and fauna to black-and-white human figures and earthy brown palettes it's a strong statement, including work by Fizz favourite, street artist Reko Rennie. Keep going into The Rocks, Campbell's Cove and Walsh Bay for more, including luminescent laneway stunner 'Tectonic', formed from 1,500 suspended, upcycled PET bottles filled with tonic water. Harbour Lights sees boats and ferries lit up with LEDs, while for the first time many of the skyscrapers facing the Quay are given the colour-block lighting treatment ('Dress Circle'). Intel's 'Drone 100' will see 100 illuminated drones take to the skies for five nights only (8-12 June, 7.55pm), performing a colourful choreographed seven-minute routine over Sydney Harbour. Controlled by one main pilot, the bespoke animation will be set to music.

BELOW: Martin Place's 'Fountain' installation; Central Park beckons with a 'Silent Disco' and architectural projections

You can spy the towering columns of light created by 'Geometrics' from across town, let alone from beneath the kinetic sculpture at central-city precinct Martin Place; nearby 'Fountain' live-streams global birth data as 'human water droplets' to highlight our burgeoning 7.4 billion population. Further afield, Central Park teams a 'Silent Disco' with arty projections onto the former Carlton & United Brewery building in 'X Factory' (5.30pm-10pm). 


Vivid Light: Taronga Zoo
Bradleys Head Rd, Mosman (5.30pm-9.30pm, last entry 9pm, until 18 June)
Vivid's wildest new precinct for 2016 is Taronga Zoo, featuring 'Be the Light for the Wild', an illuminated trail of 10 critically endangered species from Australia and Sumatra, including the Asian elephant and platypus. Created by Ample Projects, the giant multimedia sculptures include interactive lighting, sound effects and moving parts, making them among the largest and most technologically advanced lanterns to appear at Vivid. A supporting cast of creatures, from an echidna to a crocodile and pygmy tarsiers, ups the cuteness ante. Pre-purchase tickets online ($17.95 adults, $11.95 kids aged 4-15); entry costs aid the conservation effort.

ABOVE: Animal lanterns at Sydney's Taronga Zoo, including a vibrant echidna, pygmy tarsiers and a crocodile


Vivid Light: The Royal Botanic Garden Sydney
Entry Queen Elizabeth II Gates via Opera House Forecourt (6pm-11pm, until 18 June)
A new precinct for 2016 is The Royal Botanic Garden Sydney, where trees and plants will be lit up with a magical cluster of light art for Vivid. Highlights include the glittering 'Cathedral Of Light', a sinuous long arched tunnel onlookers can walk through, framing views of the Opera House. Made up of thousands of dazzling LED lights, it takes its cue from the traditional arched windows of historic churches and is selfie heaven. Also look out for 3D-mapped fig tree projection 'Synthesis', interactive installation 'Sentiment Cocoon' and fantastical 'Will 'o the Wisps'.

ABOVE: The Royal Botanic Garden Sydney, featuring Vivid crowd favourite the arched 'Cathedral Of Light', tree projection 'Synthesis' and interactive experience 'Sentiment Cocoon'


Vivid Music: Björk
Carriageworks, 245 Wilson Street, Eveleigh (10am-6pm, 4-18 June)
Tickets for Björk's two DJ sets for the opening of 'Björk Digital' at Carriageworks (3 and 4 June) went quicker than a hot toddy in a Reykjavik bar, but you can still see the world premiere of her new touring virtual reality project, which takes over the evocative former rail yards until 18 June. Divided into five spaces and accompanied by collaborations with key filmmakers and programmers, the exhibition draws heavily on videos created for recent album 'Vulnicura' (above) and 'Biophilia', including immersive spaces, surround-sound and 360-degree film. 'I felt it was time to premiere my recent virtual reality stuff,' says Björk, 'We have made seven 360-degree videos for 'Vulnicura', and I am enthusiastic about this natural continuity of the music video; the intimacy, and total merge of surround-sound and vision, makes VR an ideal home.' It's free to attend, but book asap for the virtual reality rooms.


Vivid Music: New Order
Sydney Opera House (until 5 June)

New Order's four gigs at the Sydney Opera House, showcasing recent album 'Music Complete', may be sold out, but you can still see images of the band, including iconic portraits of their earlier incarnation as Joy Division, in a free photography exhibition in the Concert Hall Northern Foyers. By UK photographer Kevin Cummins, known for documenting the Manchester music scene, it runs until 5 June (6pm-late). The show is accompanied by artwork for the band by seminal British graphic designer Peter Saville, famous for setting the house style for Manchester's Factory Records label as their hugely influential art director. As part of Vivid's 'New Order Project', a talk with New Order in conversation with filmmaker/MFS label head Mark Reeder has just been announced for Friday 3 June (6.30pm, Playhouse); get in quick.

ABOVE: New Order plays the Opera House (photo, Nick Wilson)


ABOVE: Factory Design District in Waterloo showcases local talent and products, such as ISM Objects' 'Wink' table lamp, Studio Liam Mugavin's glass-topped 'Tangle' table and Boardgrove Architects' 'Two Tables'

Vivid Ideas: Factory Design District
901 Bourke Street, Waterloo (3-5 June, 11am to 6pm, 5pm and 4pm respectively)

Factory Design District takes over creative co-working space COMMUNE in Waterloo for three days, hosting industry talks, demonstrations and workshops, celebrating Australian design talent, the authentic and the handmade. Over 30 local designers, producers and makers are on board, with a curated exhibition including furniture by Jonathan West, bespoke joiner JP Finsbury, Boardgrove Architects and Studio Liam Mugavin, lighting by Abalos and accessories by The Fortynine.

Up-and-coming Thirroul-based designer Trent Jansen, who worked with Marcel Wanders, is speaking on Friday (4pm-5.30pm, ticketed), while established brand founders from Dinosaur Designs, TaitMUD Australia and ISM Objects give a talk Sunday (11.30am-1pm, ticketed), alongside a showcase of their recent designs. New Zealand lighting and furniture whizz David Trubridge discusses design copyright on Sunday (2pm-5pm), which is also market day with COMMUNE's Locally Made (11am-4pm) featuring some of Sydney's best inner-west makers across crafts, arts, fashion and music. See Factory Design District's own website for full details. Food and drink is local too, with contributions from Newtown's Young Henrys brewing co, Bloodwood and Continental Deli, St Peters' Urban Winery and Mecca Coffee.

Vivid Ideas: Design (various)
Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, Level 6 Terrace Entrance (Circular Quay West Side)
The MCA is also hosting a few interesting design talks and interactive workshops, covering everything from humble design (7 June, 2pm-4pm) to 3D printing (8 June, 8am-10am) and the ethics of drones (8 June, 5pm-7pm). Check out Vivid's website for more events tackling architecture, digital design and so-now social media for your own lightbulb moment...

vividsydney.com
Vivid Sydney runs until 18 June 2016, with lights on from 6pm (usually until 11pm). Most of the public light art is free, but some events require booking or tickets. Lead image, Destination NSW