Stanley Kubrick: The Exhibition

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The work and legacy of Stanley Kubrick, one of celluloid’s greatest film directors, is celebrated at London’s Design Museum. The Fizz takes a sneak peek…

BY DEE IVA

With its futuristic sets and intelligent technology, epic 1968 sci-fi movie ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’, by legendary US film director Stanley Kubrick, has always been a firm Fizz fave. Rotating stairwells, pre-iPad tablets and spaceports with distinctive ‘Djinn’ chairs by Olivier Mourgue are just a few details which have become iconic design moments on the silver screen, while the HAL 9000 computer (arguably the movie’s biggest star) is a precursor to Alexa and Siri.

Now ’Stanley Kubrick: The Exhibition’, proving a hot ticket at London’s Design Museum, goes behind the scenes to show how Kubrick created his masterpiece along with other classic movies including ‘A Clockwork Orange’, ‘Barry Lyndon’ and ‘The Shining’. Running until 15 September, the must-see exhibition dedicates a room to each film displaying handwritten notes, early scripts, costumes, props and models. Rejected designs by US graphic designer Saul Bass for promotional posters for 1980 horror flick ‘The Shining’ are on show, as is a recreation of Howard Johnson’s Earthlight Room from ‘A Space Odyssey’. The droog (gang mate) costume from 1971’s dystopian crime film ‘A Clockwork Orange’ still has a certain frisson today from its associations with ‘a little of the old ultraviolence’.

ABOVE: The gravity-defying rotating stairwell from Kubrick’s ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’
ABOVE RIGHT: Artificial intelligence in the form of the HAL 9000 computer from ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’
BELOW FROM LEFT: English actor Malcolm McDowell as chief droog Alex in ‘A Clockwork Orange‘; A droog costume in the exhibition

Kubrick liked to exercise total control over each of his projects, which almost always drove him to recreate places and spaces on a sound studio rather than go on location. Many of ‘The Shining’’s Rocky Mountains-set scenes in The Overlook Hotel were shot at the UK’s Elstree Studios as were the infamous Dawn of Man ape scenes from ‘A Space Odyssey’. An ingenious projection method was devised to create the illusion that the ape footage was shot outside, just one example of Kubrick’s many experimental processes explored here.

BELOW: The entry to the Design Museum exhibition features a montage of scenes from Kubrick’s films demonstrating his signature ‘one-point perspective’ technique

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ABOVE: Stanley Kubrick directs Jack Nicholson on the set of cult classic ‘The Shining’

Kubrick’s ground-breaking design collaborations, including his work with acclaimed German-British talent Ken Adam on set designs for 1964 black comedy/political satire ‘Dr. Strangelove’, are also celebrated in the exhibition. Since Stanley Kubrick’s death in 1999 few film directors have made as big a mark as the great auteur. We highly recommend heading over to the Design Museum to discover why.
designmuseum.org

‘Stanley Kubrick: The Exhibition’ is on now until 15 September 2019 at the Design Museum, 224-238 Kensington High Street, London W8. Book in advance online to avoid disappointment as select dates are selling out fast.

Pictures: Warner Bros Entertainment Inc; Ed Reeve


Ostens: Scents and Sensibility

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New scent brand Ostens is channelling the sensory power of fragrance with a vibrant, immersive installation in London

BY CLAIRE BINGHAM

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New fragrance brand Ostens wants to change the way we think about scent. The idea is to harness emotions – through the use of single note-inspired scents – and visualize them in terms of colour. Abstract artist Wassily Kandinsky believed that colour is a power that directly influences the soul. Ostens is clearly on the same page.

The conceptual label is currently showcasing its first set of fragrances in a gallery-like space at London’s 62 Blandford Street in Marylebone, debuting with a pink neon-lit, rose-inspired installation designed by Ostens’ Creative Director Mark Wilkie. The sensory experience will constantly evolve with a fresh installation every couple of months to showcase individual perfumes. This is about encountering perfume not through typical advertising but instead by taking in the atmosphere directly and following your nose for yourself.

ABOVE: An eye-popping luminescent pink display in London’s Marylebone showcasing ’Rose OiI Isparta’ from Ostens’ debut fragrance collection
RIGHT: Ostens co-founders Laurent Delafon and Chris Yu outside the Blandford Street store
BELOW: ’Rose Oil Isparta’ eau de parfum, £145 for 50ml; ’Patchouli Heart’ eau de parfum, £85 for 50ml; ’Cedarwood Heart’ fragrance oil, £35 for 9ml

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Ostens is masterminded by two fragrance experts, Laurent Delafon and Chris Yu, who worked with some of the most talented perfumers at International Flavors & Fragrances to craft their new unisex scent collections, launched this December. Creative inspiration came from championing exceptional hero ingredients from Laboratoire Monique Rémy – a world-leading supplier of natural ingredients to the perfume industry, now owned by IFF. The result? Tantalising perfumes designed as an ode to a single note, such as ‘Patchouli Heart No. 1’ by perfumer Domitille Michalon Bertier and ‘Rose Oil Isparta’ by Dominique Ropion. Préparations (perfume oils) intensify and carry the key ingredients, while Impressions (eau de parfum) use the hero elements as a jumping-off point.

Combining perfume with colour and art, Laurent and Chris have taken the olfactive compositions even further by developing a visual language for each of the hero notes, making the invisible visible through the use of colour combinations to evoke emotions generated by the distinctive scents. 
ostens.com

Ostens offers five Préparations (fragrance oils), from £35 for 9ml, and six Impressions (eau de parfum), from £85 for 50ml. Discover Ostens in residence at 62 Blandford Street, London W1; see website for opening hours.

Goop London Pop-Up

Goop brings its Californian-inspired beauty, fashion and homewares collection to the UK with its debut London pop-up store, a blend of British craftsmanship and West Coast chill

BY CLAIRE BINGHAM

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Gwyneth Paltrow’s Goop has opened in its first UK pop-up store – in London’s Westbourne Grove – and we’re already feeling enriched.

Combining retail therapy with their open-minded and holistic approach to wellbeing as a lifestyle, it is far from wacky and a brilliant new destination for anyone interested in Californian-vibe beauty and style.

Expect a chic, curated collection of Goop’s own-line products, including luxurious, high-performance skincare drawing on organic ingredients, Italian-made limited edition clothing, and pretty plates and glassware by brands such as Mud Australia, Nude Glass and CB2. The understated homewares range features tempting cushions, throws, tableware and kitchen kit.

You’ll also fall for the light-filled, nature-inspired surrounds created by London-based interior designer Fran Hickman. Her vision for the store references the Zen-influenced monochrome paintings of Yves Klein and early physic gardens devoted to the study of restorative plants. Fran worked with local design talents to bring the space to life – Nikki Tibbles of Wild at Heart for planting, Pinch for furniture and beauty displays, Nest Design for the electric-blue curtains in the dressing area, and Vitsoe for its iconic shelving systems. Architectural salvage firm Retrouvius supplied a vintage museum cabinet.

ABOVE: The entrance to Goop’s London pop-up shop is filled with plant displays by Nikki Tibbles.
ABOVE RIGHT: Goop’s own-line detoxifying salt bath soak G.Tox. £30 for 680gm

ABOVE: A deep blue colour scheme channels the ocean on the basement fashion floor; industrial chipboard delivers an inexpensive yet effective display system in the homewares section, flanked by sunny gold paint; Pinch’s smart red ‘Joyce’ cabinet and ‘Clyde’ side table with stripped floorboards and tile details; the ‘Imo’ bench by Pinch in a restful foliage- and light-filled space at the front of the store

Goop celebrates its 10-year anniversary with this London outpost – slated to stay open until 27 January 2019 – setting the stage for further international boutiques. Goop fans in search of their simple yet elegant contemporary pieces can also shop online.
goop.com

Goop, 188 Westbourne Grove, London W11

LDF 2018 – 10 Unmissable FizzPicks for London Design Biennale

London Design Biennale is a must for design hunters, bringing inspiring global ideas to Somerset House

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

One of our top tips for London Design Festival, London Design Biennale gathers creatives from 40 countries, cities and territories across six continents at Somerset House, all responding to 2018’s theme of ‘Emotional States’. Exploring ideas through design, architecture and technology – addressing social, political and environmental challenges – the second edition is a thought-provoking showcase, running until 23 September.

Influential museums and institutions are among the curators, including London’s V&A (‘Maps of Defiance’), New York’s Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum (‘Face Values’) and Milan’s Triennale (‘L’Architettura degli Alberi’). All the participants are worth a look, but here are 10 of our favourite FizzPicks…

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AUSTRALIA: ‘Full Spectrum’
London-based Australian designer Flynn Talbot channels Australia’s recent referendum vote to legalise same-sex marriage with vibrant light installation ‘Full Spectrum’. A celebration of diversity, the ecstatic, immersive work incorporates an arcing curve of rainbow colour, inspired by the Pride flag, embracing the whole spectrum. Its suspended light screen is formed from 150 strands of fibre-optic light, each a different hue, using custom-made hidden LED modules and electronics. You can touch and move through the strands or simply feel the love.


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LATVIA: ‘Matter to Matter’
Visitors can leave fleeting messages on a wall of condensation at Latvia’s entry ‘Matter to Matter’, designed by Arthur Analts of Variant Studio, which shares the emotional impact of mark making. Taking its cue from the Baltic state’s humid climate, with capital Riga surrounded by forests and the sea, it’s a statement about culture, transience and nature’s power to reclaim human traces. Each message lasts only a few minutes on the green glass surface, before fading away. Complete with a wooden bench, the simple, sensory space won ‘Best Design Medal’ at the Biennale.


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LEBANON: ‘The Silent Room’
Escape from city stress in ‘The Silent Room’, Lebanon’s blue-hued retreat from the pressures of public space. Enter the perforated brick-and-timber tower and a staircase leads to a dimly lit upper level. Within this fabric-lined, insulated cocoon, speakers play a field recording of quiet urban moments. ‘Silence is becoming a commodity for the privileged,’ says designer Nathalie Harb, whose private shelter offers ‘the luxury of silence to everyone, regardless of background or status.’ Influenced by her crowded home city Beirut, she hopes her soundscape provides a sensory respite from the madding crowd.


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INDIA: ‘State of Indigo’
We love blue, especially dreamy indigo, but the dark history of indigo farming has remained mysterious. India’s pavilion, backed by The Gujral Foundation, illuminates the ‘State of Indigo’, sharing the colonial slavery and contemporary social issues behind this emotionally charged pigment. A natural colour created from the indigofera plant, indigo was used ‘to dye fabric, repel insects, treat ailments, disinfect, ward off spirits and even decorate an entire city’, says curator Priya Khanchandani, who wants us to experience the working conditions behind this blue beauty.


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GUATEMALA: ‘Palopó’
Pattern and colour can transform lives and economies as ‘Palopó’, Guatemala’s pavilion, proves. It promotes a project to paint a whole town in vibrant hues, inspired by local, ancestral textile patterns, turning it into a vast artwork to attract tourism. Led by designer Diego Olivero of Olivero & Bland Studio, Pintando Santa Catarina Palopó aims to support an impoverished town on Lake Atitlán. The London installation celebrates this social design initiative, harnessing floating geometric forms resembling the multi-coloured houses, flanked by a textile mobile by Zyle.


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GREECE: ‘ΑΝΥΠΑΚΟΗ – Disobedience’
Championing the ancient Greek concept of civil disobedience, Greece’s kinetic ‘ΑΝΥΠΑΚΟΗ’ installation challenges our perception of static architecture. Designed by Nassia Inglessis-led Studio INI, its 17-metre-long wall is formed from a steel spring skeleton and recycled plastic, so it flexes and morphs around the human body. Visitors can enjoy the transgressive walkway, passing through the wall and feeling it respond in return. A boundary, but also a rebellious, exciting space to explore, it suggests a new, more dynamic shape for future city buildings.


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ITALY: ‘L’Architettura degli Alberi’
Based on a 20-year study of trees, Italian pavilion ‘L’Architettura degli Alberi’ reflects a labour of love by architects Cesare Leonardi and studio partner Franca Stagi. The duo documented Italy’s trees to help landscape designers, crafting accurate, beautifully detailed drawings of different trees at a 1:100 scale. Expanding to include European and Central American trees, the book was finally published in 1982, featuring 374 evocative illustrations of 211 species. This installation presented by La Triennale di Milano shares 24 of them, ideal for inspiring parks and public spaces.


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EGYPT: ‘Modernist Indignation’
Winner of the London Design Biennale 2018 Medal, Egypt’s display ‘Modernist Indignation’ charts the sad loss of the country’s once-vaunted modernist architecture, now left to rot or actively destroyed by critics. The pavilion is an elegy to that vulnerable and dying design language, featuring a contemporary reinterpretation of a fictional 1939 exhibition put on by Al Emara, the first Arabic design magazine (published from 1939 to 1959). It also includes a video shot in the house of its founding architect Sayed Karim, his manifesto and logo, gradually erased on the floor.


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SWEDEN: ‘Coal: Post-Fuel’
Coal could have emotional value, becoming a desirable design material, according to this intriguing Swedish exhibit by Jesper Eriksson. ‘Coal: Post Fuel’ considers an alternative future for this Industrial Age power source, imagining its life beyond a dirty fuel for burning. His installation features furniture, flooring and objects made from solid coal, some in their raw state and other pieces processed into a black marble-like finish. Eriksson reckons ‘Britain’s most iconic material’ can be rebranded for architecture and interior design. Think organic, quarried luxury…


THE NETHERLANDS: ‘Power Plant’
Fearful about food security and the future environment? Luckily, The Netherlands is on top of things, with its ‘Power Plant’ pavilion showing how design can solve the problem of population-pressured food production. A futuristic greenhouse, it uses sunlight to generate both food and the electricity needed to grow it. Designer Marjan van Aubel is behind this elegant solution, with the building’s transparent solar glass, hydroponic system, vertical growth structure and specifically coloured LEDs fostering a year-round, high-yield indoor harvest.


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Finally, don’t miss The Refugees’ Pavilion, a temporary shelter housing objects designed by displaced people. The pavilion itself is the ‘Better Shelter’, winner of the Design Museum’s Design of the Year 2016, a structure that unpacks from two cardboard boxes, and can be assembled by four people with one hammer in just a few hours. Inside, visitors can see how refugees worldwide have customised the flatpack making it their own. Social design in action.
www.londondesignbiennale.com

London Design Biennale is at Somerset House, Strand, London WC2 from 4 to 23 September 2018. Book tickets online or opt for a guided tour.

Photos: Mark Cocksedge (Australia Pavilion); Ed Reeve

Bohinc Studio

Lara Bohinc, the fashionistas' favourite jewellery designer, has a chic new London space to play house in. Step into her gem of a showroom...

BY DEE IVA

‘Jewellery for the home’ is how Slovenian jewellery designer Lara Bohinc describes her venture into furniture, lighting and accessories. Having wowed the fashion intelligentsia with her delicate filigree jewellery designs since graduating from London's Royal College of Art in 1997, Bohinc is having the same effect on the world of interiors.

So much so that she launched Bohinc Studio in 2016 to continue her foray into homewares and has now opened a new showroom in West London to share the results. Set on the ground floor of a Grade II-listed townhouse, it's the perfect setting to view her elegant marble, brass, glass and ceramic collections, backdropped by period cornicing and bold geometric-patterned marble floors.

ABOVE: Lara Bohinc's new West London showroom
ABOVE RIGHT: Designer Lara Bohinc
BELOW: Bohinc's 'Collision Console' table, £15,550, and 'Collision Large Table Light', £4,815

Bohinc’s first furniture design the rotating marble-and-brass ‘Solaris Kinetic Table’, part of the 'Lunar Collection' for Lapicida, can be seen here but we’re particularly taken with the new ‘Collision Console’ table, also for the luxe UK stone specialist. A star piece in her chic showroom, the simple geometric shape echoes Bohinc’s jewellery, albeit on a much larger scale. Also on show is the ‘Fortress’ collection of ceramic vases, inspired by octagonal towers at Diocletian's Palace in Split, Croatia, sinuous Murano glass 'Venturi' vases, and the deconstructed gold-and-white ceiling and table lights from the ‘Collision’ series.

BELOW: The 'Fortress' collection of vases in white, gold and bronze, from £625

Welcome to grown-up glamour for the well-heeled home...
bohincstudio.com

Bohinc Studio, Ground Floor, 59 Kensington Gardens Square, London W2. Open daily from 10am to 6pm by appointment only