Melbourne Design Week 2019 – 6 Must-Sees

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This year’s Melbourne Design Week offers a thought-provoking mix of exhibitions, talks and tours. Take a peek…

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

2019’s Melbourne Design Week features more than 200 exhibitions, talks, tours, films and workshops, with events across town and in neighbouring city Geelong. Running from 14 to 24 March, Melbourne’s largest festival programme to date celebrates both local and international talent, with the core theme of ‘Design Experiments’ – asking how design can shape the future. A mix of ticketed and free activities embrace diverse challenges from the environment to social issues and materials. This year’s festival wraps up on Sunday, but many of the inspiring shows continue beyond the weekend. Here are six of our top FizzPicks…

‘SOMEWHERE OTHER’: JOHN WARDLE ARCHITECTS
Ground Level/Foyer, NGV Australia, Federation Square
Until 28 July (10am-5pm, free)

Visitors are invited to peek through five portals within timber and steel structure ‘Somewhere Other’, a compact, interactive experience by Melbourne practice John Wardle Architects. At NGV Australia until late July, this intriguing installation was first shown as part of 2018’s 16th International Architecture Exhibition at the Venice Architecture Biennale (pictured, top and above). Each of the wooden volumes, voids and apertures in its interconnected series frames views of the studio’s projects, the Australian landscape or the craft of collaborators including artist Natasha Johns-Messenger and filmmakers Coco and Maximilian.

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‘NEW VOLUMES BY ARTEDOMUS’: AN INSTALLATION BY FIONA LYNCH AND THOMAS COWARD
TDF Gallery, 14 Little Oxford Street, Collingwood
Until 24 March (11am-5pm, free)

We’re big fans of Artedomus’s ‘New Volumes’ collection, which showcases solid marble homewares by eight Australian designers. This Collingwood exhibition, curated by interior designer Fiona Lynch and designer Thomas Coward, represents the range in an installation that follows the journey of this sculptural material from the ‘ground to the house’, contrasted with a series of chunky marble plinths.

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‘MATERIAL THOUGHT’
Modern Times, 311 Smith Street, Fitzroy
Until 24 March (see link for times, free)

Presented by Fitzroy interiors store Modern Times, group exhibition ‘Material Thought’ explores material through the work of innovative Australian designers. On show are furniture, lighting and objects by nine top talents, including Henry Wilson (‘Stone Surface Sconce’, in Calacatta Marble, above), Coco Flip and Christopher Boots, all illuminating themes of design experimentation and sustainability.

’CLEMENT MEADMORE: THE ART OF MID-CENTURY DESIGN’
Ian Potter Museum of Art, University of Melbourne, Swanston Street
Until 24 March (see link for times, free)

Fans of modernism will enjoy exhibition ‘Clement Meadmore: The art of mid-century design’, a homage to the acclaimed Australian talent. The first major survey of Meadmore’s industrial design practice, it explores the inspirations that shaped the renowned sculptor’s early career as a designer. Part of a new wave of Australian design in the Fifties and Sixties, Meadmore championed streamlined forms, fresh materials and new manufacturing processes. His furniture and lighting appeared in the houses of iconic architect Robin Boyd, with well known designs such as his 1951 corded dining chair on view at the Ian Potter Museum of Art.

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‘WELCOME TO WASTELAND’
Compound Interest, 15-25 Keele Street, Collingwood
Until 24 March (11am-5pm, free)

Presented by Friends & Associates, ‘Welcome to Wasteland’ shares the work of cutting-edge local talents involved with sustainable design. Featuring architects, industrial designers, furniture makers and researchers, the show explores the potential of waste materials recycled into fresh, eco-friendly products. Typically innovative is Vert Design’s ‘HuskeeCup’ made from coffee husk waste, their collaboration with Spark & Burnish to craft ‘Marine Debris Bakelite Door Knobs’, and Maddison Ryder’s use of discarded Iceberg lettuce to form ‘Lettuce Eat’ disposable plates. Other materials in the mix include waste glass, ceramic, plastic, oyster shells, rubber bands, paper pulp, denim jeans, pigs’ blood and even golf balls!

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WORK SHOP: FIONA LYNCH
7 Glasshouse Road, Collingwood
Until 24 March (see link for times, free)

A curatorial showcase of experimental design, fine art and objects, interior designer Fiona Lynch’s new permanent gallery Work Shop aims to celebrate work by Australian and international designers and artists, as well as doubling as a testing ground for her own studio’s practice. For Melbourne Design Week, the debut show curates a selection of pieces examining the tension between resolved and incomplete elements, including ceramics by Olivia Walker (black porcelain collapsed vessel, above), burnt wood bowls by Makiko Ryujin, paintings by Jiaxin Nong and lighting design by Mary Wallis.

www.ngv.vic.gov.au/melbourne-design-week
Melbourne Design Week 2019 runs until Sunday 24 March at venues across the city and Geelong

Bohinc Studio

Lara Bohinc, the fashionistas' favourite jewellery designer, has a chic new London space to play house in. Step into her gem of a showroom...

BY DEE IVA

‘Jewellery for the home’ is how Slovenian jewellery designer Lara Bohinc describes her venture into furniture, lighting and accessories. Having wowed the fashion intelligentsia with her delicate filigree jewellery designs since graduating from London's Royal College of Art in 1997, Bohinc is having the same effect on the world of interiors.

So much so that she launched Bohinc Studio in 2016 to continue her foray into homewares and has now opened a new showroom in West London to share the results. Set on the ground floor of a Grade II-listed townhouse, it's the perfect setting to view her elegant marble, brass, glass and ceramic collections, backdropped by period cornicing and bold geometric-patterned marble floors.

ABOVE: Lara Bohinc's new West London showroom
ABOVE RIGHT: Designer Lara Bohinc
BELOW: Bohinc's 'Collision Console' table, £15,550, and 'Collision Large Table Light', £4,815

Bohinc’s first furniture design the rotating marble-and-brass ‘Solaris Kinetic Table’, part of the 'Lunar Collection' for Lapicida, can be seen here but we’re particularly taken with the new ‘Collision Console’ table, also for the luxe UK stone specialist. A star piece in her chic showroom, the simple geometric shape echoes Bohinc’s jewellery, albeit on a much larger scale. Also on show is the ‘Fortress’ collection of ceramic vases, inspired by octagonal towers at Diocletian's Palace in Split, Croatia, sinuous Murano glass 'Venturi' vases, and the deconstructed gold-and-white ceiling and table lights from the ‘Collision’ series.

BELOW: The 'Fortress' collection of vases in white, gold and bronze, from £625

Welcome to grown-up glamour for the well-heeled home...
bohincstudio.com

Bohinc Studio, Ground Floor, 59 Kensington Gardens Square, London W2. Open daily from 10am to 6pm by appointment only

20th Biennale of Sydney

Ming Wong, 'Windows On The World (Part 1)', 2014, mixed media installation with video. Courtesy of Para Site and Spring Workshop, Hong Kong. Photograph_ Glenn Eugen Ellingsen.JPG

Packed with contemporary art and installations, the 20th Biennale of Sydney still has two more weekends to go. Navigate the maze with our fave FizzPicks…

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Every two years the Harbour City gets its art on, with the free Biennale of Sydney taking over town. Running until 5 June 2016, the 20th edition unveils work by 83 artists from 35 countries across seven major venues, dubbed ‘Embassies of Thought’, as well as a string of in-between fringe spaces. Around 70 per cent of artists are showing new commissions, many of them site-specific.

Under the artistic direction of Dr Stephanie Rosenthal, Chief Curator of London's Hayward Gallery, the 2016 theme is based on a quote by US sci-fi author William Gibson: ‘The future is already here – it’s just not evenly distributed.’ Inspired by the idea that access to information technology is still uneven globally, leading to a new poverty gap, the Biennale aims to address the time we’re living in now, as well as imagining where we're going. 'I conceived the venues as Embassies of Thought,' said Rosenthal. 'Each entwined and connected.' So while the Embassy of the Real deals with ways we perceive reality in the digital age, the Embassy of Disappearance 'explores how languages and cultures are disappearing' and the Embassy of Transition engages with the cycles of life and death.

With a blizzard of art up for grabs, even culture-vultures may get overwhelmed. Luckily, our FizzPicks offer edited highlights…

ABOVE: Ming Wong, 'Windows On The World (Part 1)', 2014, mixed-media installation with video
BELOW: Charwei Tsai, 'Spiral Incense: Hundred Syllable Mantra', 2016, spiral incense made of herbal materials

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Mortuary Station: Embassy of Transition
Regent Street, Chippendale
Grab the chance to inspect the interior of Chippendale's Victorian Mortuary Station, an atmospheric heritage-listed former funeral station once used to transport coffins and mourners by rail to Rookwood Cemetery. Taiwanese artist Charwei Tsai’s ritualistic ‘Spiral Incense’ installation sees smoking incense coils suspended over the prettily tiled platform, hand-inscribed with Buddhist mantras. Video art projected onto the waiting room floors ruminates on the impermanence of life. Outside, aviaries by London artist Marco Chiandetti host live birds pecking at classical sculpture body parts in an unnerving investigation of spirituality. Gothic or what?

BELOW: Jamie North, 'Succession', 2016, mixed materials; Lee Mingwei, 'Guernica in Sand', 2006 and 2015, mixed-media interactive installation

Carriageworks: Embassy of Disappearance
245 Wilson Street, Eveleigh
It’s hard for any art to compete with jaw-dropping former rail yards Carriageworks, but Sydney-based Jamie North’s sculpture-meets-nature installation ‘Succession’ rises like a biological wonder in this cavernous warehouse. Combining industrial waste products (cement, steel, steel slag, coal ash) with native Australian plants, organic matter and oyster shells, his karst-like cast-concrete forms incorporate miniature landscapes, riffing on distressed architecture. NY-based Taiwanese talent Lee Mingwei’s ‘Guernica in Sand’ – a transitory sand art piece taking its cue from Picasso’s iconic anti-war painting – may have been brushed away, but its blurry swirls of yellow, grey and white still hold a strange beauty.

BELOW: Lee Bul, 'Willing To Be Vulnerable', 2015-16, mixed materials; Korakrit Arunanondchai, 'Painting with history in a room filled with people with funny names 3', 2015-16, HD video, denim, foam, wood; William Forsythe, 'Nowhere and Everywhere at the Same Time, no.2', 2013, plumb bobs, string, compressed air cylinders, aluminium frames

Cockatoo Island: Embassy of the Real
Sydney Harbour
One of the strongest Biennale clusters, Cockatoo Island displays work surrounded by the eery ruins of Sydney’s convict, industrial and ship-building heritage. In the industrial sector, we liked Architecturally-influenced Korean artist Lee Bul’s huge, futuristic ‘Willing To Be Vulnerable’ installation, which mashed up metalised and transparent film, heavy-duty fabric, LED lighting, a fog machine, zeppelin-like inflatables and an ethereal air balloon in a bold red, white and black palette. Inspired by urban, eco and anti-authoritarian spiritual themes, Thai artist Korakrit Arunanondchai’s video of Bangkok life was powerfully immersive, but we couldn’t help appreciating the midnight blue-and-white dyed denim floor cushions for the lounging audience. Frankfurt-based American William Forsythe’s mesmerising kinetic work ‘Nowhere and Everywhere at the Same Time’ fills a distressed space with swinging strings, weighted down with plumb bobs, allowing viewers to interact with the movement. Shanghai's Xu Zhen deconstructs classical and Buddhist sculptures in a monumental work tackling the past, while Singapore's Ming Wong assembles a bank of video screens to show his own vibrant, kooky sci-fi films.

BELOW: Chiharu Shiota, 'Conscious Sleep', 2009/2016, beds, thread; Bharti Kher, 'Six Women', 2013-15, plaster of paris, wood, metal; Cevdet Erek, 'Room of Rhythms – Long Distance Relationship', 2016, mixed media and architectural additions

Taking over a heritage convict barracks, Japanese artist Chiharu Shiota's spooky 'Conscious Sleep' installation is a wow, tangling old, upended dormitory beds in a spider's web of black threads. For subtle work 'Piedra en el Zapato', Colombia's Miguel Angel Rojas has crafted a fake, geometric-tiled floor from lime, charcoal powder and mixed materials in an old convict building. New Delhi-based Londoner Bharti Kher peoples an old room with touching nude plaster sculptures in 'Six Women'. By contrast, Turkish artist Cevdet Erek's 'Room of Rhythms – Long Distance Relationship' fills a ruined structure with sound art beats, emanating from black boxes.

BELOW: Sheila Hicks, 'The Embassy of Chromatic Delegates', 2015-16, sculptural elements, various fabrics, bamboo; Taro Shinoda, 'Abstraction of Confusion', 2016, clay, pigment, ochre, tatami mats; Nyapanyapa Yunupingu, 'Bathala', 2012, natural earth pigments on hollow log

Art Gallery of New South Wales: Embassy of Spirits
Art Gallery Road, Sydney
If colour and texture turn you on, then hit the Art Gallery of NSW for American artist Sheila Hicks’ sculptural ensemble ‘The Embassy of Chromatic Delegates’. Vibrant linen, cotton, nylon, polyester, bamboo and wood combine to form a dazzling acid-bright work (imagine this painterly palette used for high-impact rugs, wallpaper or cushions). Hicks’ acrylic-fibre ‘The Questioning Column’ hangs on the gallery’s facade, draped around a classical column like a rainbow waterfall. A world away, Tokyo’s Taro Shinoda channels minimal, neutral-hued interiors, with his ‘Abstraction of Confusion’, a simple tatami-mat platform that embraces simplicity and meditation. Shinoda’s hand-built installations and contemplative sculptural works are informed by karesansui, traditional Japanese garden design. Yirrkala-born indigenous artist Nyapanyapa Yunupingu’s forest of logs almost has an oriental quality; stripped-back nature meets graphic mark-making.

BELOW: Nine Beier, 'Allegory of Charity', 2015, ceramic cups, coffee beans, resin, wood, metal; Céline Condorelli, 'Structure for Communicating with Wind', from the series 'Additionals', 2012-13/2016, metallicised space blanket, curtain tape

Museum of Contemporary Art Australia: Embassy of Translation
140 George Street, The Rocks
Danish artist Nina Beier caught our eye at the MCA with her striking installation ‘Allegory of Charity’, a series of suspended ceramic cups pouring coffee beans onto ‘Tileables’, a patchwork floor of outsize ceramic tiles. Think T.S. Eliot’s poem ‘The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock’: 'I have measured out my life in coffee spoons'. French talent Céline Condorelli’s fluttering gold curtain, ‘Structure for Communicating with Wind’, draws on architecture and notions of support, with a metallicised space blanket wafting in space.

Artspace: Embassy of Non-Participation
43-51 Cowper Wharf Road, Woolloomooloo
A former artists’ squat turned experimental gallery, Artspace is showing London artist duo Karen Mirza and Brad Butler, including neon work ‘You are the Prime Minister’, backdropped by plush red curtains.

ABOVE: Karen Mirza/Brad Butler, 'You are the Prime Minister', 2014, neon
BELOW: Daniel Boyd, 'What Remains', 2016, site-specific installation, mirrored dots, synthetic polymer paint; Keg de Souza, 'We Built This City' installation, 2016, tents, tarps, hessian sacks, mixed media; Bo Christian Larsson, 'Fade Away, Fade Away, Fade Away,' 2016, mixed-media and performative installation

In-between Spaces
Scattered around town, fringe installations and acts also beckon, especially in the inner-west. One of our favourites is at Redfern Wall on the corner of Vine and Eveleigh streets near aboriginal heartland The Block. ‘What Remains’, by Sydney Kudjila/Gangalu artist Daniel Boyd, is a site-specific constellation of 12,000 mirrored dots covering a chunky corner of wall, backed by black paint. It shimmers and sparkles, reflecting passersby, and looks inky black or midnight blue depending on the light. For 'We Built This City', Perth-born Keg de Souza constructs a patchwork tent dwelling on Redfern's Vine Street. Wrapping up, literally, on a deathly note, Swede Bo Christian Larsson’s ‘Fade Away, Fade Away, Fade Away’ sees gravestones in Newtown’s Camperdown Cemetery covered in white fabric, creating ghostly sculptures from found-objects. Whipped up in his on-site workshop, they look not unlike pale Scandi chair covers. Who said art and decor can't be bedfellows?

The 20th Biennale of Sydney runs at citywide venues until Sunday 5 June 2016
biennaleofsydney.com.au

Andy Warhol | Ai Weiwei

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It’s the last chance to catch two modern art greats at Melbourne’s 'Andy Warhol | Ai Weiwei' show

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Pop Art provocateur Andy Warhol and Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei come together in a celebration of two of contemporary art’s most radical talents. There’s still time to catch ‘Andy Warhol | Ai Weiwei’ at Melbourne’s NGV International, with extended hours this weekend before the hit show wraps up Monday on ANZAC Day.

Tickets have been selling like hot bagels/dumplings for this compelling doubleheader, which takes two of the 20th and 21st centuries’ most controversial artists and explores the parallels and contrasts in their work. Developed exclusively by Melbourne’s National Gallery of Victoria and Pittsburgh’s The Andy Warhol Museum, the exhibition follows on from Weiwei’s recent headline-grabbing shows at London's Royal Academy and Copenhagen's Faurschou Foundation. Over 300 works are on display, spanning painting, sculpture, photography, film, publishing and social media.

ABOVE: A young Ai Weiwei imitates Warhol's pose: 'At the Museum of Modern Art', 1987, silver gelatin photo from the 'New York Photographs' series 1983-93, Ai Weiwei Studio
ABOVE RIGHT: Ai Weiwei at the current National Gallery of Victoria exhibition 'Andy Warhol | Ai Weiwei', with his room installation featuring Australian advocates of human rights, photo by John Gollings
BELOW FROM LEFT: Andy Warhol's 'Mao', 1972, acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen; 'Andy Warhol in Tiananmen Square', 1982, photo by Christopher Makos, makostudio.com

Pop Art protagonist Warhol, who died in 1987, represents the ‘American century’, with his bold explorations of consumer culture, capitalism and celebrity (including its dark side, from car crashes to state executions). Artist and social activist Weiwei, born in 1957, is one of the most visible faces of the current ‘Chinese century’, with Asia’s superpower dominating global commerce. There are many crossovers between the pair though, with Weiwei living in the States from 1981 to 1993 where he was inspired by Warhol’s conceptual approach. Weiwei’s interdisciplinary practice also mirrors The Factory, Warhol’s famously bohemian studio, using collaboration and social media to broaden the reach of his art. The exhibition presents more than 200 of Warhol’s iconic works, including his famous ‘Mao’ portrait; Warhol visited China and was intrigued by its iconography and politics. Up for grabs are more than 120 works by Weiwei, making this Australia's most comprehensive retrospective of his output to date.

BELOW: Ai Weiwei goes potty!: 'Coloured Vases', 2006, Neolithic vases (5000-3000 BC) and industrial paint; 'Neolithic Pottery with Coca Cola Logo', 2007, paint, Neolithic ceramic urn; two installation views of the Melbourne 'Andy Warhol | Ai Weiwei' exhibition showing Andy Warhol artworks and Ai Weiwei pots, photos by Brooke Holm

ABOVE: 'Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn', 1995, three silver gelatin photographs, Ai Weiwei Studio

We love Weiwei’s jaw-dropping pot pieces, including his vibrant ‘Coloured Vases’ cluster, splattering ancient vases with industrial paint, and culture-clash work ‘Neolithic Pottery with Coca Cola Logo’. Both take an ancient art form and reinvent it for the modern era, offering similar shock tactics to that of British potter Grayson Perry

New commissions include a bespoke installation from Weiwei’s ongoing ‘Forever Bicycles’ series forming an arch at the exhibition entrance. It incorporates 1,400 readymade bicycles, a recurring motif in Weiwei's photos, but here detached from their function in a blur of mesmerising repetition; the individual melds into the multitude. Also new is a major five-metre-tall work from his crystal ‘Chandelier’ series, shaped like an antique Han Dynasty tomb lamp, ‘Blossom 2015’ featuring a bed of delicate porcelain flowers, and the playful 'Caonima (Grass Mud Horse) Balloons and Bird Balloons', a floating inflatable work influenced by Warhol's 'Silver Clouds' 1966.

ABOVE: Installation view of 'Forever Bicycles' by Ai Weiwei at Melbourne's 'Andy Warhol | Ai Weiwei' exhibition, photo by Brooke Holm; Ai Weiwei at the show snapping his 2015 'Caonima Balloons and Bird Balloons' kinetic installation, photo by John Gollings

Don’t miss 'Studio Cats' in the NGV Kids section, which celebrates both artists’ love affair with cats, depicted on wallpaper, film, photos and paper works. In the Fifties Warhol lived with a herd of Siamese cats, and created ink-blot drawings, photos and pictures of them in his early career. More than 30 cats enjoy free reign in Weiwei’s studio, popping up in cameo roles in his social media posts. Weiwei rates felines for their independence, freedom and aloofness, embracing their 21st-century Instagram status. It seems these two cool art cats had a lot in common...
www.ngv.vic.gov.au

BELOW FROM TOP: 'Ai Weiwei with cat, @aiww, Instagram', 2006, Ai Weiwei Studio; 'Andy Warhol with Siamese Cat', c. 1957, gelatin silver photograph, by Edward Wallowitch

'Andy Warhol | Ai Weiwei' is at NGV International, 180 St Kilda Road, Melbourne, until 5pm Monday 25 April 2016; extended hours apply including 24-hour opening from 10pm Saturday 23-10pm Sunday 24 April, and a special performance by Robert Forster (The Go-Betweens). It transfers to The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, USA, from 4 June to 28 August 2016.

LDF 2015 – Eight Must-sees at Tent and Super Brands

Group shows Tent and Super Brands bring hot design talent to East London. Here are our eight FizzPicks...

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

London Design Festival 2015 is in full swing, but there's still time to cut a slice of the action. Twin shows Tent and Super Brands are at East London's cavernous Truman Brewery until Sunday 27 September, offering a smorgasbord of talent just a skip from Shoreditch Design Triangle.

Featuring more than 440 designers, from crafts names to bold brands from 29 countries, there's a bewildering amount to see. The exhibition is divided into independent, emerging talents at Tent, more established global labels at Super Brands, and national and craft exhibitions at Galleries and Country Showcases, from the Australian International Pavilion to Etsy UK: Four Corners of Craft. There's also a compact tech zone, Techable, and Super Talks 2015, including debates on colour trends and 2016's World Design Capital Taipei.

So, grab your pals, some comfy trainers and our guide to eight must-sees for design hunters... 

&New, Super Brands (S48, Hall SBL)
UK/Finnish contemporary furniture duo &New – aka Jo Wilton and Mirka Grohn – design vibrant, skinny steel furniture that throws great shapes. Think side tables, desks, consoles and clothes rails in pretty pastels and punchy primaries, manufactured in Blighty in small batches.
andnew.co.uk

Glassmania Bohemian Glass Masters, Gallery Events (SC10, Hall T2 2nd Floor)
We're taken with these reinvented tiffin containers in cut crystal with leather straps by Daniela Chodilova for Astera Glass, adding a luxurious touch to an everyday item. Czech glass is rightly famous, so swing by 'Glassmania' for a showcase of true Bohemian talent.
czechtrade.co.uk

Poiat, Super Brands (S16)
When it comes to sleek wooden seating, you've got to hand it to the Finns. Poiat is sharing its award-winning, shapely, moulded plywood 'Lavitta' chair collection, designed to slot into each other for striking storage. Also look out for group show 'Finnish Form', which presents 18 of the country's future-forward designers, brands and manufacturers, including the vibrant modern textiles and tableware of Jonna Saarinen (Hall T1, First Floor, Tent main building).
services.poiat.com 

Constancy and Change in Korean Traditional Craft, Gallery Events (T4, Hall A)
There's something strangely irresistible about these tactile paper vases by Lee Young Soon. Part of the 'Constancy and Change in Korean Traditional Craft' exhibit, presented by KCDF (Korean Craft and Design Foundation), they embody the theme of 'Su-Su, Deom-Deom, Eun-Eun' or 'Simple, Calm, Subtle.' There's 193 pieces of work by 23 artists in six craft categories covering metal, ceramics. lacquer, bamboo, paper and textiles, teaming tradition with modern grace.
kcdf.kr/eng

100% Norway, Gallery Events (Hall G4, Ground Floor)
100% Norway has added a twist to its curation, selecting prototypes and contemporary products from young Norwegian designers set against iconic mid-century and classic designs. We like the graphic 'Fauna' bookends by Hallgeir Homstvedt, formed from Nordic rock in the shape of a native fox, bullfinch, puffin and hedgehog. Slimline 'Duplé' tables and seats from Alexander Åsgård also get our vote, along with Siv Lier's oak-and-brass 'Spring' trays with arty disc-shaped mirrors and Andreas Bergsaker's covetable 'Blossom' accessories trays including two mirrors and a light. From the classics, don't miss the graphic 'Dokka' pendants by Birger Dahl for Northern Lighting and the white and sky-blue 'Hold' pots by Kristine Bjaadal for Magnor Glassverk. Touchy-feely treats.
100percentnorway.com

What Goes Behind... Contemporary Polish Ceramic Design, Gallery Events (C21, Hall T2)
Last year we were impressed by Tent's round-up of Polish graphic and product design, including retro-font-toting 'Mamsam' cups by Full Metal Jacket; this year, Contemporary Polish Ceramic Design is enjoying exposure. There's kooky, graphic work by Magdalena Lapinska, dreamy aqua 'Weeds' plates by Karina Marusinska and striking blue squiggly 'Oko' vases by Malwina Konopacka.
culture.pl

Maoli, Super Brands (S15)
Madagascan brand Maoli is showing off its architectural 'inConcrete' collection, including super-thin tables. Available in white, grey, rust and charcoal, the furniture and accessories can be used inside or out. Legs for the tall 'Jòto Bè' table detach for easier transport.
maoli-inconcrete.com

Sue Pryke, Tent London (F08, Hall T1)
Simple, contemporary and oh-so-shapely, the handcrafted ceramic tableware on Sue Pryke's stall will have you reaching for your chequebook at 'Hello!' Her slipcase terracotta cups and jugs may be familiar, combining white tin glaze over red earth clay, but there are some seductive new colours and forms on offer too, including gorgeous charcoal-grey vases. We love the indigo milk pourer and 'Mr & Mrs' water carafe, both in vitrified earthenware, and the 'Mr & Mrs' teaspoons.
suepryke.com

Lead photo and select others for 100% Norway by Siren Lauvdal.

Tent London and Super Brands London run until Sunday 27 September 2015 at Old Truman Brewery, Hanbury Street, London E1. Open 10am to 8pm; 11am to 6pm Sunday. Last entry 45 minutes before closing. Tickets available online or on the door; tentlondon.co.uk