Rigg Design Prize 2018

INST041629.jpg

2018’s inspiring Rigg Design Prize celebrates 10 of the best Australian interior design practices

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Interiors gets their hour in the sun at the 2018 Rigg Design Prize exhibition at Melbourne’s NGV Australia, which runs until 24 February 2019. Celebrating different contemporary design disciplines, the triennial prize focused on interior design and decoration for the first time in 2018, shortlisting 10 leading Australian practices. Each was tasked with creating a bespoke, purpose-built room in the gallery, responding to the theme of ‘Domestic Living’. The results are inspiring, suggesting fresh ways of inhabiting our homes, new trends and creative solutions to modern pressures. Even if you can’t get to Melbourne, check out our round up the 10 designs below…

HECKER GUTHRIE
Melbourne design practice Hecker Guthrie (aka Paul Hecker and Hamish Guthrie) bagged the AU$30,000 triennial prize for their graphic yet tactile installation ‘The table is the base’ (above). Riffing on the idea of the humble table, and its charismatic central role in domestic living spaces, the custom-made room plays with clean lines, form and scale. It explores the table as surface, support and enclosure. Judge Shashi Caan said, ‘Using only two elements – the simple form of the ‘Parsons’ table and terracotta as material – the project demonstrates the power of design restraint and curiosity at play.’


INST041598.jpg

MARTYN THOMPSON STUDIO
New York-based Australian photographer and designer Martyn Thompson’s space celebrates the ‘Atelier’, channelling the modern blurring of work and home life as an opportunity for creative expression. Bathed in light and shadow, his moody space features many of his own designs – including upholstery textiles, rugs, ottomans, wall treatments, ceramics, art and photos shown alongside collaborative, vintage, found and hand-crafted pieces. Even Thompson’s records, shoes and fleamarket finds make the cut. Clothes are hung like artworks and ambient music generates emotion. Flexible and ever-evolving, this is the home as heartland, layered, textural and deeply personal.


INST041604.jpg

DANIELLE BRUSTMAN
Like a chic spaceship or cool club, Danielle Brustman’s installation ‘Inner-Terior’ is somewhere we’d like to hang out. It helps that it stars a contemporary update of a cocooning, conversation pit and a futuristic record player (shown above right). A set designer before founding her Melbourne studio, Brustman drew on theatrical aesthetics for this curvy white space, edged with vibrant colour, glossy metallics and eye-catching illuminations. A lounge room that borrows from stage and spectacle, it takes its cues from Art Deco bandshells, European retro-futurist designs from the 60s, 80s movie Xanadu, rollerskating rinks and amusement rides. We reckon it’s 2001: A Space Odyssey gone domestic.


INST041609.jpg

THE SOCIETY INC BY SIBELLA COURT
Stylist and author Sibella Court, of Sydney interiors store The Society Inc, has always had a love affair with global curios, vintage finds, old tools, pirates and gypsies. For her Rigg Prize entry, dubbed the ‘Imaginarium’, she envisaged a space to ‘wonder, imagine, interact, research and create’. An entire home distilled into a single room, it feels darkly magical, with a rich mix of materials from pressed metal to wood and fabric. Layers of textures and colours, old and new, and real and imagined offer a modern take on a 16th-century ‘cabinet of curiosities’. The space celebrates craft, with displayed objects, including a striking feature wall, acting as a catalyst for memory and imagination. From an alchemy workshop to a ship’s crow’s nest, a bar, dress-up cupboard and pot-belly stove, it’s a mini world of wonders.


INST041601.jpg

RICHARDS STANISICH
Texture rules in the mesmerising tone-on-tone sculptural installation crafted by Richards Stanisich, titled ‘Our natural needs in a digital world’. The Sydney practice, established in 2018 by former SJB talents Jonathan Richards and Kirsten Stanisich, addresses our fundamental need for shelter, sanctuary, hygiene and intimacy and how it has been transformed by integrated technology and the Internet of Things. A central ochre living, sleeping and kitchen space champions the handmade, simple and earthy, with natural fabrics, ceramics and tiles. By contrast, it’s surrounded by black gloss tiles edged with blue light, representing the digital realm.


INST041621.jpg

FLACK STUDIO
Melbourne interior architecture firm Flack Studio has a way with vibrant colour, bold pattern and unexpected details, as seen in their striking portfolio of residential spaces, cafes, restaurants and boutiques. For the Rigg Prize, David Flack and his team ‘Flackify’ their living/dining space with saturated gold hues, luxe textures and quirky art and ornaments. ‘We’ve boundless plains to share’ references diversity and inclusion, creating an emotionally charged room for a golden age in Australia, encouraging collaboration and community.


INST041620.jpg

ARENT&PYKE
Elegance and beauty are at the heart of ‘Home: feast, bathe, rest’ by Sydney interior design studio Arent&Pyke (Juliette Arent and Sarah-Jane Pyke). The smartly zoned space combines areas for dining, washing and retreating, offering ideas for respite and emotional and physical wellbeing in a stressful world. Each area includes a contemporary Australian artwork and a bespoke piece of furniture, blending inspiring design-art with comforting, restorative simplicity.


INST041614.jpg

AMBER ROAD
Sydney interior design and landscape practice Amber Road’s seductive space ‘Take it outside’ is full of burnt colours, floaty textiles and dreamy desert and starlit views, centred around an inviting lounger. It celebrates the verandah or porch as a key transitional zone for relaxing and chatting together, especially in Australian homes. Principal designers and sisters Yasmine Ghoniem and Katy Svalbe spent time in the Middle East, as well as on their family farms in Australia, capturing this heritage in a beautifully crafted indoor-outdoor room.


INST041624.jpg

DAVID HICKS
Have homes become inner sanctums, fortresses or vessels for consumerist ideals? Melbourne- and LA-based David Hicks studio presents ‘Panic room’, combining Hicks’ trademark eye for luxe detail with lighting strung on chunky chains and threatening screens. It’s a slick satire on our panicked, media-saturated times, suggesting a life on stage, voyeuristic and yet paranoid about threats from outside. Has the aspirational ideal of a perfect life morphed into homes as psychological retreats and cocoons for self-protection?


INST041615.jpg

SCOTT WESTON ARCHITECTURE DESIGN
A sequence of six rooms forms ‘Wunderkammer’, an installation by Sydney-based Scott Weston Architecture Design which takes its cue from the renovation of Weston’s own Victorian Italianate terrace house, Villa Carmelina. Each contains a cabinet, or wunderkammer, featuring prized ‘jewels’, miniature artworks by favourite makers. An abstract representation of the house, it makes use of monochrome dioramas with coloured highlights and wallpaper vignettes or ornaments and collectibles.

Catch the Rigg Design Prize 2018 at Level 3, NGV Australia, Federation Square, Melbourne until Sunday 24 February 2019 (10am-5pm) or see the gallery’s website for a virtual tour and online interviews with the designers

Ostens: Scents and Sensibility

OSTENS DSC_0349CR version - UPPR.jpg

New scent brand Ostens is channelling the sensory power of fragrance with a vibrant, immersive installation in London

BY CLAIRE BINGHAM

OSTENS DSC_0772CR version - UPPR.jpg

New fragrance brand Ostens wants to change the way we think about scent. The idea is to harness emotions – through the use of single note-inspired scents – and visualize them in terms of colour. Abstract artist Wassily Kandinsky believed that colour is a power that directly influences the soul. Ostens is clearly on the same page.

The conceptual label is currently showcasing its first set of fragrances in a gallery-like space at London’s 62 Blandford Street in Marylebone, debuting with a pink neon-lit, rose-inspired installation designed by Ostens’ Creative Director Mark Wilkie. The sensory experience will constantly evolve with a fresh installation every couple of months to showcase individual perfumes. This is about encountering perfume not through typical advertising but instead by taking in the atmosphere directly and following your nose for yourself.

ABOVE: An eye-popping luminescent pink display in London’s Marylebone showcasing ’Rose OiI Isparta’ from Ostens’ debut fragrance collection
RIGHT: Ostens co-founders Laurent Delafon and Chris Yu outside the Blandford Street store
BELOW: ’Rose Oil Isparta’ eau de parfum, £145 for 50ml; ’Patchouli Heart’ eau de parfum, £85 for 50ml; ’Cedarwood Heart’ fragrance oil, £35 for 9ml

DF COMP.jpg

Ostens is masterminded by two fragrance experts, Laurent Delafon and Chris Yu, who worked with some of the most talented perfumers at International Flavors & Fragrances to craft their new unisex scent collections, launched this December. Creative inspiration came from championing exceptional hero ingredients from Laboratoire Monique Rémy – a world-leading supplier of natural ingredients to the perfume industry, now owned by IFF. The result? Tantalising perfumes designed as an ode to a single note, such as ‘Patchouli Heart No. 1’ by perfumer Domitille Michalon Bertier and ‘Rose Oil Isparta’ by Dominique Ropion. Préparations (perfume oils) intensify and carry the key ingredients, while Impressions (eau de parfum) use the hero elements as a jumping-off point.

Combining perfume with colour and art, Laurent and Chris have taken the olfactive compositions even further by developing a visual language for each of the hero notes, making the invisible visible through the use of colour combinations to evoke emotions generated by the distinctive scents. 
ostens.com

Ostens offers five Préparations (fragrance oils), from £35 for 9ml, and six Impressions (eau de parfum), from £85 for 50ml. Discover Ostens in residence at 62 Blandford Street, London W1; see website for opening hours.

Goop London Pop-Up

Goop brings its Californian-inspired beauty, fashion and homewares collection to the UK with its debut London pop-up store, a blend of British craftsmanship and West Coast chill

BY CLAIRE BINGHAM

Bath soak.jpg

Gwyneth Paltrow’s Goop has opened in its first UK pop-up store – in London’s Westbourne Grove – and we’re already feeling enriched.

Combining retail therapy with their open-minded and holistic approach to wellbeing as a lifestyle, it is far from wacky and a brilliant new destination for anyone interested in Californian-vibe beauty and style.

Expect a chic, curated collection of Goop’s own-line products, including luxurious, high-performance skincare drawing on organic ingredients, Italian-made limited edition clothing, and pretty plates and glassware by brands such as Mud Australia, Nude Glass and CB2. The understated homewares range features tempting cushions, throws, tableware and kitchen kit.

You’ll also fall for the light-filled, nature-inspired surrounds created by London-based interior designer Fran Hickman. Her vision for the store references the Zen-influenced monochrome paintings of Yves Klein and early physic gardens devoted to the study of restorative plants. Fran worked with local design talents to bring the space to life – Nikki Tibbles of Wild at Heart for planting, Pinch for furniture and beauty displays, Nest Design for the electric-blue curtains in the dressing area, and Vitsoe for its iconic shelving systems. Architectural salvage firm Retrouvius supplied a vintage museum cabinet.

ABOVE: The entrance to Goop’s London pop-up shop is filled with plant displays by Nikki Tibbles.
ABOVE RIGHT: Goop’s own-line detoxifying salt bath soak G.Tox. £30 for 680gm

ABOVE: A deep blue colour scheme channels the ocean on the basement fashion floor; industrial chipboard delivers an inexpensive yet effective display system in the homewares section, flanked by sunny gold paint; Pinch’s smart red ‘Joyce’ cabinet and ‘Clyde’ side table with stripped floorboards and tile details; the ‘Imo’ bench by Pinch in a restful foliage- and light-filled space at the front of the store

Goop celebrates its 10-year anniversary with this London outpost – slated to stay open until 27 January 2019 – setting the stage for further international boutiques. Goop fans in search of their simple yet elegant contemporary pieces can also shop online.
goop.com

Goop, 188 Westbourne Grove, London W11

LDF 2018 – 10 Unmissable FizzPicks for London Design Biennale

London Design Biennale is a must for design hunters, bringing inspiring global ideas to Somerset House

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

One of our top tips for London Design Festival, London Design Biennale gathers creatives from 40 countries, cities and territories across six continents at Somerset House, all responding to 2018’s theme of ‘Emotional States’. Exploring ideas through design, architecture and technology – addressing social, political and environmental challenges – the second edition is a thought-provoking showcase, running until 23 September.

Influential museums and institutions are among the curators, including London’s V&A (‘Maps of Defiance’), New York’s Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum (‘Face Values’) and Milan’s Triennale (‘L’Architettura degli Alberi’). All the participants are worth a look, but here are 10 of our favourite FizzPicks…

180903_flynntalbot_londondesignbiennale_image©markcocksedge_012.JPG

AUSTRALIA: ‘Full Spectrum’
London-based Australian designer Flynn Talbot channels Australia’s recent referendum vote to legalise same-sex marriage with vibrant light installation ‘Full Spectrum’. A celebration of diversity, the ecstatic, immersive work incorporates an arcing curve of rainbow colour, inspired by the Pride flag, embracing the whole spectrum. Its suspended light screen is formed from 150 strands of fibre-optic light, each a different hue, using custom-made hidden LED modules and electronics. You can touch and move through the strands or simply feel the love.


LDB18_Latvia_ArthurAnalts_EdReeve-03.jpg

LATVIA: ‘Matter to Matter’
Visitors can leave fleeting messages on a wall of condensation at Latvia’s entry ‘Matter to Matter’, designed by Arthur Analts of Variant Studio, which shares the emotional impact of mark making. Taking its cue from the Baltic state’s humid climate, with capital Riga surrounded by forests and the sea, it’s a statement about culture, transience and nature’s power to reclaim human traces. Each message lasts only a few minutes on the green glass surface, before fading away. Complete with a wooden bench, the simple, sensory space won ‘Best Design Medal’ at the Biennale.


LDB18_Lebanon_NathalieHarb_EdReeve-01.jpg

LEBANON: ‘The Silent Room’
Escape from city stress in ‘The Silent Room’, Lebanon’s blue-hued retreat from the pressures of public space. Enter the perforated brick-and-timber tower and a staircase leads to a dimly lit upper level. Within this fabric-lined, insulated cocoon, speakers play a field recording of quiet urban moments. ‘Silence is becoming a commodity for the privileged,’ says designer Nathalie Harb, whose private shelter offers ‘the luxury of silence to everyone, regardless of background or status.’ Influenced by her crowded home city Beirut, she hopes her soundscape provides a sensory respite from the madding crowd.


State-of-Indigo.-India-Pavilion-at-London-Design-Biennale-2018.-Film-Still-courtesy-The-Colours-of-Nature-1024x762.jpg

INDIA: ‘State of Indigo’
We love blue, especially dreamy indigo, but the dark history of indigo farming has remained mysterious. India’s pavilion, backed by The Gujral Foundation, illuminates the ‘State of Indigo’, sharing the colonial slavery and contemporary social issues behind this emotionally charged pigment. A natural colour created from the indigofera plant, indigo was used ‘to dye fabric, repel insects, treat ailments, disinfect, ward off spirits and even decorate an entire city’, says curator Priya Khanchandani, who wants us to experience the working conditions behind this blue beauty.


LDB18_Guatemala_OliveroBlandStudio_Zyle_EdReeve-01.jpg

GUATEMALA: ‘Palopó’
Pattern and colour can transform lives and economies as ‘Palopó’, Guatemala’s pavilion, proves. It promotes a project to paint a whole town in vibrant hues, inspired by local, ancestral textile patterns, turning it into a vast artwork to attract tourism. Led by designer Diego Olivero of Olivero & Bland Studio, Pintando Santa Catarina Palopó aims to support an impoverished town on Lake Atitlán. The London installation celebrates this social design initiative, harnessing floating geometric forms resembling the multi-coloured houses, flanked by a textile mobile by Zyle.


LDB18_Greece_StudioINI_NassiaIngessis_EdReeve-01.jpg

GREECE: ‘ΑΝΥΠΑΚΟΗ – Disobedience’
Championing the ancient Greek concept of civil disobedience, Greece’s kinetic ‘ΑΝΥΠΑΚΟΗ’ installation challenges our perception of static architecture. Designed by Nassia Inglessis-led Studio INI, its 17-metre-long wall is formed from a steel spring skeleton and recycled plastic, so it flexes and morphs around the human body. Visitors can enjoy the transgressive walkway, passing through the wall and feeling it respond in return. A boundary, but also a rebellious, exciting space to explore, it suggests a new, more dynamic shape for future city buildings.


LDB18_Italy_LaTrinnalediMilano_VariousDesigners_EdReeve-02.jpg

ITALY: ‘L’Architettura degli Alberi’
Based on a 20-year study of trees, Italian pavilion ‘L’Architettura degli Alberi’ reflects a labour of love by architects Cesare Leonardi and studio partner Franca Stagi. The duo documented Italy’s trees to help landscape designers, crafting accurate, beautifully detailed drawings of different trees at a 1:100 scale. Expanding to include European and Central American trees, the book was finally published in 1982, featuring 374 evocative illustrations of 211 species. This installation presented by La Triennale di Milano shares 24 of them, ideal for inspiring parks and public spaces.


LDB18_Egypt_MohamedElshahed_EdReeve-01_0.jpg

EGYPT: ‘Modernist Indignation’
Winner of the London Design Biennale 2018 Medal, Egypt’s display ‘Modernist Indignation’ charts the sad loss of the country’s once-vaunted modernist architecture, now left to rot or actively destroyed by critics. The pavilion is an elegy to that vulnerable and dying design language, featuring a contemporary reinterpretation of a fictional 1939 exhibition put on by Al Emara, the first Arabic design magazine (published from 1939 to 1959). It also includes a video shot in the house of its founding architect Sayed Karim, his manifesto and logo, gradually erased on the floor.


LDB18_Sweden_JesperEriksson_EdReeve-02.jpg

SWEDEN: ‘Coal: Post-Fuel’
Coal could have emotional value, becoming a desirable design material, according to this intriguing Swedish exhibit by Jesper Eriksson. ‘Coal: Post Fuel’ considers an alternative future for this Industrial Age power source, imagining its life beyond a dirty fuel for burning. His installation features furniture, flooring and objects made from solid coal, some in their raw state and other pieces processed into a black marble-like finish. Eriksson reckons ‘Britain’s most iconic material’ can be rebranded for architecture and interior design. Think organic, quarried luxury…


THE NETHERLANDS: ‘Power Plant’
Fearful about food security and the future environment? Luckily, The Netherlands is on top of things, with its ‘Power Plant’ pavilion showing how design can solve the problem of population-pressured food production. A futuristic greenhouse, it uses sunlight to generate both food and the electricity needed to grow it. Designer Marjan van Aubel is behind this elegant solution, with the building’s transparent solar glass, hydroponic system, vertical growth structure and specifically coloured LEDs fostering a year-round, high-yield indoor harvest.


Hero Image Stateless_0.jpg

Finally, don’t miss The Refugees’ Pavilion, a temporary shelter housing objects designed by displaced people. The pavilion itself is the ‘Better Shelter’, winner of the Design Museum’s Design of the Year 2016, a structure that unpacks from two cardboard boxes, and can be assembled by four people with one hammer in just a few hours. Inside, visitors can see how refugees worldwide have customised the flatpack making it their own. Social design in action.
www.londondesignbiennale.com

London Design Biennale is at Somerset House, Strand, London WC2 from 4 to 23 September 2018. Book tickets online or opt for a guided tour.

Photos: Mark Cocksedge (Australia Pavilion); Ed Reeve

Vivid Sydney 2018

Vivid Sydney brings light art, music and inspiring ideas to town, including impressive design talents. Strike a light!

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Vivid Sydney returns to illuminate the city for 23 nights, from Friday 25 May to Saturday 16 June, celebrating its 10th anniversary with a vibrant mix of light, music and ideas. The largest festival of its kind, Sydney's winter-warmer promises eye-catching projections, light art, interactive installations, live bands and cutting-edge talks, with illuminating speakers, exhibitions and workshops.

Running from 6pm to 11pm each night, Vivid is divided into 11 precincts of light sculptures and installations, with new festival zone Luna Park at the iconic harbourside funfair. Favourite zones are back, including Circular QuayCity and Surrounds, Harbour Lights, The Royal Botanic Garden, The Rocks, Barangaroo, Darling Harbour, Taronga Zoo, Kings Cross and Chatswood. Creativity will be front and centre, spanning digital, product and graphic designs. Here are six Fizz picks...

LIGHTING_THE_SAILS_1900X900-DNSW-TILES-1.jpg

Lighting of the Sails: Metamathemagical
This year's Sydney Opera House sails will be illuminated by site-specific kinetic digital artworks by graphic designer Jonathan Zawada. Entitled 'Metamathemagical', the 15-minute, recurring light show envisages Australia as an 'elemental, timeless place that is also completely new and full of energy.' We're big fans of the celebrated Australian artist, and recently explored his work with electronic musician Flume. Byron Bay-based Zawada took inspiration from Australian nature and its unique flora and fauna for the Vivid project. Responding to the 3D form of the Opera House's architecture, rather than treating it as a flat plane, Zawada drew on images of flowers, plants, feathers, rocks and human figures to craft a hyperreal 'saturation of colour, pattern and texture' (for more insights see this video interview). The visuals are teamed with a soundtrack featuring Air Max '97XO and EPROM.

MCA press still Jonny 8[2] WEB-1.jpg

Virtual Vibration
Always a highlight, the façade of the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia (MCA) will be animated by 'Virtual Vibration', a blend of psychedelic art and more formal modernism. The large-scale projection mapping is a collaboration between Australian artist Jonny Niesche, electronic musician and composer Mark Pritchard and the Spinifex Group. Expect a shifting, sensory light experience playing with transparency, reflection and movement, set to mesmerising sound.

ZAWADA_TALK_1900x900-DNSW (1).jpg

Jonathan Zawada and Mark Pritchard in Conversation
Sydney Opera House curator Sarah Rees will join 'Jonathan Zawada and Mark Pritchard in Conversation' (5pm-6pm, 27 May), a talk highlighting the frequent collaborators' work and recent 13-minute film project 'The Four Worlds', inspired by Pritchard's haunting, ambient album of the same name. Zawada is responsible for the 'Lighting of the Sails' digital art illuminating Sydney Opera House this year, while electronic producer Pritchard's music is part of the nearby MCA's installation. Zawada has also created artwork for Pritchard's previous albums. Catch free screenings of the otherworldly film at The Samsung Lounge from 25 May to 16 June.

light Beam.jpg

Skylark
Interactive lighting display Skylark lets visitors put their own colourful mark on the city, lighting up Sydney Harbour Bridge and the surrounding skyscrapers of Circular Quay. Designed by Australian talent Iain Reed of 32 Hundred Lighting, this year's version of the attraction includes a dynamic new feature, Bradfield's Beacon, a custom-built, interactive laser atop the Bridge that's double the strength of any laser seen in the Harbour before. It will wash the Harbour and its headlands in colour, while 40 pillars of light above the Overseas Passenger Terminal adds to the spectacle.

Dreams.jpg

Dreams (Daniel Johns and Luke Steele)
Vivid packs a musical punch, with an extensive line-up of live bands, DJs, club nights and parties, including major acts Solange and Ice Cube. Our pick is Dreams on 29 and 30 May at Sydney Opera House. Exclusive to Vivid LIVE, it's the Australian premiere of the band, an intriguing collaboration between two of the country's most iconic musical talents: Daniel Johns (former frontman of Silverchair) and Luke Steele (Empire of The Sun, The Sleepy Jackson). If their recent tracks 'No One Defeats Us' and 'Silence' are anything to go by, the duo should deliver darkly charismatic performances and a bold, experimental sound.

eoi-44411-VIVID IMAGE 1_3.jpg

Good Design Festival
The annual Good Design Festival takes over two floors of the Overseas Passenger Terminal in The Rocks from 25 to 27 May (7.30pm-10pm Friday, 4pm-10pm Saturday and Sunday). The established showcase includes a retrospective of the past 60 years of Australia's Good Design Awards, shares 260 award-winning international projects from 2018's awards, and predicts future talents in the NextGen winners category. The free public exhibition gathers diverse designs, from the Sydney Olympic torch to a deep-sea submarine, electronic bike, suspension tent and museum architecture. Book tickets online for the official launch party (5.30pm-7.30pm, 25 May) and for the 'Good Design Exchange' (6pm, 26 May), a talk hosted by Good Design Australia with graphic design whizz Vince Frost, CEO of Frost*collective, and other speakers.

vividsydney.com
Vivid Sydney runs from Friday 25 May to Saturday 16 June 2018; see the website for the app, maps, event guide and transport tips. Share your experiences on #VividSydney, #VividIdeas and #VividMusic