Stanley Kubrick: The Exhibition

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The work and legacy of Stanley Kubrick, one of celluloid’s greatest film directors, is celebrated at London’s Design Museum. The Fizz takes a sneak peek…

BY DEE IVA

With its futuristic sets and intelligent technology, epic 1968 sci-fi movie ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’, by legendary US film director Stanley Kubrick, has always been a firm Fizz fave. Rotating stairwells, pre-iPad tablets and spaceports with distinctive ‘Djinn’ chairs by Olivier Mourgue are just a few details which have become iconic design moments on the silver screen, while the HAL 9000 computer (arguably the movie’s biggest star) is a precursor to Alexa and Siri.

Now ’Stanley Kubrick: The Exhibition’, proving a hot ticket at London’s Design Museum, goes behind the scenes to show how Kubrick created his masterpiece along with other classic movies including ‘A Clockwork Orange’, ‘Barry Lyndon’ and ‘The Shining’. Running until 15 September, the must-see exhibition dedicates a room to each film displaying handwritten notes, early scripts, costumes, props and models. Rejected designs by US graphic designer Saul Bass for promotional posters for 1980 horror flick ‘The Shining’ are on show, as is a recreation of Howard Johnson’s Earthlight Room from ‘A Space Odyssey’. The droog (gang mate) costume from 1971’s dystopian crime film ‘A Clockwork Orange’ still has a certain frisson today from its associations with ‘a little of the old ultraviolence’.

ABOVE: The gravity-defying rotating stairwell from Kubrick’s ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’
ABOVE RIGHT: Artificial intelligence in the form of the HAL 9000 computer from ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’
BELOW FROM LEFT: English actor Malcolm McDowell as chief droog Alex in ‘A Clockwork Orange‘; A droog costume in the exhibition

Kubrick liked to exercise total control over each of his projects, which almost always drove him to recreate places and spaces on a sound studio rather than go on location. Many of ‘The Shining’’s Rocky Mountains-set scenes in The Overlook Hotel were shot at the UK’s Elstree Studios as were the infamous Dawn of Man ape scenes from ‘A Space Odyssey’. An ingenious projection method was devised to create the illusion that the ape footage was shot outside, just one example of Kubrick’s many experimental processes explored here.

BELOW: The entry to the Design Museum exhibition features a montage of scenes from Kubrick’s films demonstrating his signature ‘one-point perspective’ technique

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ABOVE: Stanley Kubrick directs Jack Nicholson on the set of cult classic ‘The Shining’

Kubrick’s ground-breaking design collaborations, including his work with acclaimed German-British talent Ken Adam on set designs for 1964 black comedy/political satire ‘Dr. Strangelove’, are also celebrated in the exhibition. Since Stanley Kubrick’s death in 1999 few film directors have made as big a mark as the great auteur. We highly recommend heading over to the Design Museum to discover why.
designmuseum.org

‘Stanley Kubrick: The Exhibition’ is on now until 15 September 2019 at the Design Museum, 224-238 Kensington High Street, London W8. Book in advance online to avoid disappointment as select dates are selling out fast.

Pictures: Warner Bros Entertainment Inc; Ed Reeve


Ostens: Scents and Sensibility

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New scent brand Ostens is channelling the sensory power of fragrance with a vibrant, immersive installation in London

BY CLAIRE BINGHAM

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New fragrance brand Ostens wants to change the way we think about scent. The idea is to harness emotions – through the use of single note-inspired scents – and visualize them in terms of colour. Abstract artist Wassily Kandinsky believed that colour is a power that directly influences the soul. Ostens is clearly on the same page.

The conceptual label is currently showcasing its first set of fragrances in a gallery-like space at London’s 62 Blandford Street in Marylebone, debuting with a pink neon-lit, rose-inspired installation designed by Ostens’ Creative Director Mark Wilkie. The sensory experience will constantly evolve with a fresh installation every couple of months to showcase individual perfumes. This is about encountering perfume not through typical advertising but instead by taking in the atmosphere directly and following your nose for yourself.

ABOVE: An eye-popping luminescent pink display in London’s Marylebone showcasing ’Rose OiI Isparta’ from Ostens’ debut fragrance collection
RIGHT: Ostens co-founders Laurent Delafon and Chris Yu outside the Blandford Street store
BELOW: ’Rose Oil Isparta’ eau de parfum, £145 for 50ml; ’Patchouli Heart’ eau de parfum, £85 for 50ml; ’Cedarwood Heart’ fragrance oil, £35 for 9ml

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Ostens is masterminded by two fragrance experts, Laurent Delafon and Chris Yu, who worked with some of the most talented perfumers at International Flavors & Fragrances to craft their new unisex scent collections, launched this December. Creative inspiration came from championing exceptional hero ingredients from Laboratoire Monique Rémy – a world-leading supplier of natural ingredients to the perfume industry, now owned by IFF. The result? Tantalising perfumes designed as an ode to a single note, such as ‘Patchouli Heart No. 1’ by perfumer Domitille Michalon Bertier and ‘Rose Oil Isparta’ by Dominique Ropion. Préparations (perfume oils) intensify and carry the key ingredients, while Impressions (eau de parfum) use the hero elements as a jumping-off point.

Combining perfume with colour and art, Laurent and Chris have taken the olfactive compositions even further by developing a visual language for each of the hero notes, making the invisible visible through the use of colour combinations to evoke emotions generated by the distinctive scents. 
ostens.com

Ostens offers five Préparations (fragrance oils), from £35 for 9ml, and six Impressions (eau de parfum), from £85 for 50ml. Discover Ostens in residence at 62 Blandford Street, London W1; see website for opening hours.

Claus Porto Takes Manhattan

New Yorkers can snap up a little Portuguese style with the arrival of Claus Porto’s first standalone store outside Portugal. Olá Manhattan!

BY CLAIRE BINGHAM

Portuguese label Claus Porto is famed for its exquisitely packaged soaps and, more recently, its revamped ‘Agua de Colonia' fragrance collection (right) created in collaboration with leading British perfumer Lyn Harris. However, until now, the company has been very much under the radar – a secret Lisbon and Porto gem for beauty and graphics enthusiasts alike. This is about to change.

RIGHT: British perfumer Lyn Harris has been instrumental in the brand’s revamp, These five new fragrances are based on a modern interpretation of colognes. ‘Agua de Colonia’ collection, £85 each for 125ml

Claus Porto has just opened a store on Elizabeth Street in Manhattan’s Nolita, the beauty and fragrance label’s first retail space beyond their Portuguese home. Conceived by New York firm Tacklebox Architecture, under the direction of Jeremy Barbour, the scheme is eye-catching in every sense. 

Milled from Portuguese cork, 1,500 faceted white diamond tiles line the walls of the vaulted interior, incorporating carved display niches. A 42-foot-long archway has also been inserted into the ground floor of this early 1800s building. Both pay homage to Portuguese architecture and craftsmanship, with the arch and tiles referencing Porto’s Sao Bento train station, which was first proposed in 1887 – the same year that Claus Porto was founded.

BELOW: The 1,500 faceted diamond tiles were milled from Portuguese cork – a material characteristic to the country – and reference the decorative azulejo tiled façade of the historic Casa dos Bicos in Lisbon

The arch serves as a dramatic portal to welcome visitors into the beautifully patterned and scented world of Claus Porto. It’s an otherwise minimal space, with a monolithic marble wash basin at its heart, celebrating bathing rituals. Yes, the interior is cool and futuristic – but the product remains king. What can we say but obrigado!
clausporto.com

Claus Porto, 230 Elizabeth Street, New York, NY 10012. See Claus Porto’s website for details of their Portuguese stores in Lisbon and Porto.

LDF 2018 – 11 Fizz Faves for London Design Festival

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Enjoy all the fun of the fair at this week’s London Design Festival, with our 11 must-see installations and showcases around town…

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

This year’s London Design Festival is in full swing, bringing a bewildering array of new design launches and exhibitions to town. We’ve already shared our top tips for the thought-provoking London Design Biennale and festival hub the V&A, but here are 11 citywide FizzPicks for design inspiration, taking in landmark projects, alfresco installations and seductive showrooms.

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ES DEVLIN: ‘PLEASE FEED THE LIONS’
Attracting Insta love in Trafalgar Square – as well as confused looks from tourists – interactive design ‘Please Feed The Lions’ is a collaboration between British artist/stage designer Es Devlin and Google Arts & Culture. A fifth fluorescent red lion has joined the square’s big cat statues, roaring out a crowd-sourced, collective poem. Tap in your word via the on-site screen or online to see it displayed in LEDs in the lion’s mouth. The streaming text is also projection-mapped over Nelson’s Column and the lion at night. Naturally, we fed it the words ‘design’ and ‘fizz’.
Trafalgar Square, London WC2 (18-23 September)

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KELLENBERGER-WHITE: ‘ALPHABET’
Sit on a letter or make words with the 26 vibrant, alphabet chairs at interactive installation ‘Alphabet’ in Broadgate. An experiment in folding metal to create a typographic system, the bespoke seats were designed by London graphic design consultancy Kellenberger-White, known for their playful approach to typefaces. Their inspirations ranged from Bauhaus designers to artist Bruno Munari. Each chair is a different colour, daubed in specialist industrial paint, ranging from orange to cornflower blue.
Finsbury Avenue Square, Broadgate, London EC2 (15-23 September)

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SCHOLTEN & BAIJINGS: ‘TIME FOR TEA’
Take ‘Time For Tea’ at Fortnum & Mason with help from Scholten & Baijings. The Dutch design duo will draw on more than 80 global designs for this installation celebrating the dainty ritual, drawing inspiration from the store’s signature eau de Nil colour and gorgeous green hues. The tabletop setting encompasses a new porcelain tea set produced by 1616/Arita, plus furniture, accessories and limited-edition pieces contrasting tradition with cutting-edge Dutch creativity. Featured products include chairs by HAY, Moroso and Karimoku New Standard, curtains by Maharam, and marble tables and flooring by Luce di Carrara.
First Floor, Fortnum & Mason, 181 Piccadilly, London W1 (15-23 September)

TOM DIXON: ‘ELECTROANALOGUE’
UK designer Tom Dixon hosts ‘Electroanalogue’ at his new HQ and shop The Coal Office in Kings Cross. Expect product launches, live demonstrations and workshops exploring digital innovations and traditional craft, including group show ‘Hyper Real’. Mates on board include Bill Amberg Studio (see below), sound designer Yuri Suzuki, Ege carpets, Kirkby Design, Formica, Spiritland bar and Teenage Engineering showcasing a synthesiser in a Seventies-style disco. The space is part of Coal Drops Yard, a cutting-edge shopping and dining street opening on 26 October with design by Thomas Heatherwick.
The Coal Office, 4-10 Bagley Walk Arches, Coal Drops Yard, Kings Cross, London N1 (15-23 September)

BILL AMBERG: ‘PRINTED LEATHER LAUNCH’ AT TOM DIXON STUDIO
Luxe leather brand Bill Amberg Studio presents a stunning new collection of digitally printed leathers, including British contributions from Faye Toogood, Timorous Beasties and Tom Dixon, and American-based interior designers Alexandra Champalimaud and Natasha Baradaran. It’s a gamechanger for the industry, with patterns spanning colourful sketches, splattered damasks, lace, circles, foil and rock graphics.
The Coal Office, 4-10 Bagley Walk Arches, Coal Drops Yard, Kings Cross, London N1 (15-23 September)

LEE BROOM: ‘OBSERVATORY’
British boy wonder Lee Broom brings his stellar-inspired lighting collection ‘Observatory’ to his Shoreditch showroom, a hit in Milan and New York. Playing with vertical and horizontal space, sculptural and spherical form, and light reflection and refraction, the third edition of this glamorous yet ultra-contemporary range includes pendant and table lights, making luxe use of LEDs and bespoke bulbs designed in-house.
Lee Broom, 93 Rivington Street, London EC2 (18-23 September)

HOUSE OF GREY
Book online to see House of Grey’s gorgeous North London pop-up exhibition ‘In the Neighbourhood’, a brilliant edit of local and international designers, artists and makers in two residential settings. Curated by Louisa Grey and Morgwyn Rimel, elegant townhouse ‘The Grey House’ creates a calm atmosphere celebrating texture, neutral tones, handmade craft and natural materials. By contrast, loft-style ‘The Blue House’ occupies a converted Methodist congregation hall, with vibrant, bold colours and eclectic contemporary designs. Furniture, textiles, accessories and lighting are on show, flanked by art and plants. Talents include Henry Wilson, Noorstad, Frama, Muller Van Severen for valarie_objects, Dirk Van Der Kooij and Dinosaur Designs.
By appointment only, North London (15-21 September); for availability check here.

THE CONRAN SHOP
The Conran Shop hosts two cracking shows for LDF18. At the Marylebone Store, ‘The Conran Shop x Carl Hansen’ celebrates on-trend indigo, with exclusive editions of the Danish’s firm’s furniture transformed by the deep blue hue. Think Carl Hansen & Søn’s ‘CH4 Wishbone Chair’ by Hans Wegner with an indigo lacquer and Hiut denim seat pad. A stool and chair by Kaare Klint’s also get the denim treatment. At Chelsea’s Michelin House store ‘The Conran Shop x Pinterest’ features a maze of giant red pins, channelling the social media inspo site, while visitors can Pin and save products as they shop using an app and innovative Near Field technology microchips hidden in tags. Pincodes on display reveal the inspiration behind key designs.
The Conran Shop, 55 Marylebone High Street, Marylebone, London W1; Michelin House, 81 Fulham Road, London SW3 (both 15-23 September)

MATTER OF STUFF
Prepare to be transported by London design research gallery Matter of Stuff. In Kings Cross, their pop-up Concept Gallery at Fenman House has been designed by Raw Edges. Hung with wooden dowels suspended by blue string, the space celebrates materials, finishes and texture, including marble and ceramics. It’s the ideal backdrop to Matter of Stuff’s collection of furniture and lighting (by Bohinc Studio and Uufie) plus a curated mix of global brands including CC-Tapis, Made in Ratio and La Chance. Matter of Stuff also explores blown-glass at site-specific exhibition ‘Blown Away’ at Mayfair restaurant/bar Sketch. Don’t miss the new borosilicate glass ‘Bubble’ chandelier by master glassblower Simone Crestani. Magical.
Fenman House, 5 Lewis Cubitt Walk, Kings Cross, London N1; Sketch, 9 Conduit Street, London W1 (15-23 September)

The ARAM GALLERY
Covent Garden’s The Aram Gallery presents ‘Hilos Invisibles’, a collaboration between Montevideo-born designer Matteo Fogale and seven Uruguayan design studios, including furniture, lighting, mirrors and accessories in brass, glass, wood and concrete. Inspired by the work of modernist Uruguayan architect Julio Vilamajó – a design consultant on New York’s UN Headquarters with Le Corbusier and Oscar Niemeyer – the project was born of a 2017 residency and workshop at Montevideo’s Vilamajó House Museum, built by the architect in 1930, and draws on his architectural design details.
110 Drury Lane, Covent Garden, London WC2 (17 September-27 October)

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THE NEW CRAFTSMEN
A serene sanctuary, ‘The New Craftsmen x Malgorzata Bany’ offers zen time out from the frenzy of LDF18. Hosted by contemporary British crafts showroom The New Craftsmen in Mayfair, London-based, Slade-trained artist and designer Malgorzata Bany presents her collection of sculptural furniture, objects and table lights, including new additions to the popular range. Materials span Jesmonite, metal and handmade paper, with minimal yet organic forms. Bany also shares her edit of the store’s other makers. And breathe…
34 North Row, Mayfair, London W1 (15 and 17-22 September)

londondesignfestival.com

LDF 2018 – 5 Must-Sees at the V&A

Five FizzPicks at the V&A for London Design Festival, including architecture, installations and dazzling pattern

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

A magnet for design fans, the Victoria and Albert Museum is the buzzy Festival Hub for London Design Festival for the 10th year running, with a cluster of special V&A Projects including architecture, installations and graphic design displays (until 23 September). You’ll also find exhibitions, talks, tours and workshops as part of LDF at the V&A. Here are five fresh designs you won’t want to miss…

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‘MULTIPLY’: WAUGH THISTLETON ARCHITECTS
Start at sculptural, recently launched space The Sackler Courtyard at the V&A, where temporary architectural pavilion ‘MultiPly’ has taken up residence (until 1 October). A nine-metre-high, modular maze-like installation made from American tulipwood, this pop-up project is by Waugh Thistleton Architects, supported by the American Hardwood Export Council and engineered by ARUP. It’s designed to be interactive, so you can clamber around inside. Come evening the pavilion glows with light by SEAM Design. Playfully appealing, it’s also a serious exploration of modular construction and sustainable housing, addressing climate change and housing need.

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‘THE ONION FARM’: HENRIK VIBSKOV
Danish fashion designer Henrik Vibskov is the wild mind behind ‘The Onion Farm’, a colourful installation in the V&A’s dimly lit, long, narrow Tapestries Gallery. Like a quirky car wash, it’s intended to brush visitors as they pass through, care of its vibrant, spindle-like industrial brushes and red textile ‘onions’. Somewhat surreal, it’s like something scary growing in the dark, but also riffs on ancient weaving techniques and nature scenes that chime in with the background tapestries. Don’t be afraid to get touchy-feely…

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‘DAZZLE’: PENTAGRAM x 14-18 NOV
Design studio Pentagram reinterprets experimental First World War ‘dazzle’ camouflage in ‘Dazzle’ at The Creative Studio (Level 4). Originally painted onto the surface of ships to protect them from U-boat attacks, ‘dazzle’ camouflage was first championed by British artist Norman Wilkinson. Inspired by Cubism, Vorticism and animal camouflage, he used graphic shapes to break up the profile of vessels against the sea and sky. Pentagram reinterprets the ‘dazzle’ motifs, taking them from pure graphic design into a typographic exploration. Letterforms and words from wartime poem ‘Suspense’ by Wilfrid Wilson Gibson are abstracted into immersive, monochrome patterns on a huge scale. Co-commissioned by 14-18 Now, which curates new work for the UK’s WW1 centenary commemorations, and Liverpool Biennial, this high-impact space is sure to dazzle.

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‘MEMORY & LIGHT’: ARVO PÄRT X ARUP
Music and design meet in ‘Memory & Light’, a collaborative installation by Estonian contemporary composer Arvo Pärt and engineers Arup curated by Clare Farrow. Conceived for the V&A’s Norfolk House Music Room, this multi-sensory experience was born from Pärt’s words: ‘I could compare my music to white light, which contains all colours. Only a prism can divide the colours and make them appear; this prism could be the spirit of the listener.’ Cue a transparent, curved Perspex screen and a luxe listening booth, upholstered in Poltrona Frau leather, allowing visitors to experience the music through state-of-the-art speakers.

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‘A FOUNTAIN FOR LONDON’: MICHAEL ANASTASSIADES
How do you combat disposable plastic water bottle use? Make using public water fountains a pleasure. Designer Michael Anastassiades has come up with ‘The Fleet’, a luxurious new prototype for ‘A Fountain for London’, on display in the V&A’s John Madejski Garden and Brompton Design District (at Thurloe Place opposite South Kensington station). Aimed at reviving drinking fountain culture, it’s an initiative by The London Fountain Co. (founded by publisher Charles Asprey and curator Jane Withers). Robust yet elegant, the fountain comes in bronze, stone or cast iron, and will include wall-mounted and park-friendly versions. Sipping free water never looked so eco-chic…

londondesignfestival.com; vam.ac.uk

The Victoria and Albert Museum is at Cromwell Road, London SW7; admission to most events is free.