Ostens: Scents and Sensibility

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New scent brand Ostens is channelling the sensory power of fragrance with a vibrant, immersive installation in London

BY CLAIRE BINGHAM

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New fragrance brand Ostens wants to change the way we think about scent. The idea is to harness emotions – through the use of single note-inspired scents – and visualize them in terms of colour. Abstract artist Wassily Kandinsky believed that colour is a power that directly influences the soul. Ostens is clearly on the same page.

The conceptual label is currently showcasing its first set of fragrances in a gallery-like space at London’s 62 Blandford Street in Marylebone, debuting with a pink neon-lit, rose-inspired installation designed by Ostens’ Creative Director Mark Wilkie. The sensory experience will constantly evolve with a fresh installation every couple of months to showcase individual perfumes. This is about encountering perfume not through typical advertising but instead by taking in the atmosphere directly and following your nose for yourself.

ABOVE: An eye-popping luminescent pink display in London’s Marylebone showcasing ’Rose OiI Isparta’ from Ostens’ debut fragrance collection
RIGHT: Ostens co-founders Laurent Delafon and Chris Yu outside the Blandford Street store
BELOW: ’Rose Oil Isparta’ eau de parfum, £145 for 50ml; ’Patchouli Heart’ eau de parfum, £85 for 50ml; ’Cedarwood Heart’ fragrance oil, £35 for 9ml

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Ostens is masterminded by two fragrance experts, Laurent Delafon and Chris Yu, who worked with some of the most talented perfumers at International Flavors & Fragrances to craft their new unisex scent collections, launched this December. Creative inspiration came from championing exceptional hero ingredients from Laboratoire Monique Rémy – a world-leading supplier of natural ingredients to the perfume industry, now owned by IFF. The result? Tantalising perfumes designed as an ode to a single note, such as ‘Patchouli Heart No. 1’ by perfumer Domitille Michalon Bertier and ‘Rose Oil Isparta’ by Dominique Ropion. Préparations (perfume oils) intensify and carry the key ingredients, while Impressions (eau de parfum) use the hero elements as a jumping-off point.

Combining perfume with colour and art, Laurent and Chris have taken the olfactive compositions even further by developing a visual language for each of the hero notes, making the invisible visible through the use of colour combinations to evoke emotions generated by the distinctive scents. 
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Ostens offers five Préparations (fragrance oils), from £35 for 9ml, and six Impressions (eau de parfum), from £85 for 50ml. Discover Ostens in residence at 62 Blandford Street, London W1; see website for opening hours.

Jardan Sydney

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Australian interiors brand Jardan's new Sydney store has put the seductive into staircases

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

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Sculptural. Seductive. Super-stylish. The staircase at Australian design brand Jardan's new Sydney flagship store has been drawing admiring glances, from its pale, pretty-in-pink pastel colour to its gorgeous curves. Linking the shop's three levels, it's a serious scene-stealer, with a sinuous wooden hand rail, sleek, gold-edged wooden stairs and grainy marble flooring.

ABOVE: Poised in pink: the sculptural staircase is a centrepiece at Jardan
ABOVE RIGHT: The inviting gold-meets-glass exterior of Jardan Sydney's flagship new store on a corner of Paddington's Oxford Street
BELOW: The softly geometric staircase runs from the lower ground floor up to the first storey, lit by a skylight, with tactile details including a sinuous wooden handrail, marble flooring and gold-tipped treads

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ABOVE: A seductive first-floor living area at Jardan, painted to pick up the greens and blues of the trees, sky and Sydney Harbour. Covetable ceramics make great take-home buys

By Melbourne's IF Architecture, the store on Paddington's Oxford Street takes its cue from Sydney's shifting seasons, spanning the blues of the harbour, the green canopy of the city's hilly streets, and the reds and yellows of the sun. 'Colour is expressive light, and Sydney has light like no other place in Australia,' says lead architect Iva Foschia, who designed the different levels of the space to transition between whites, blues, greens, pinks, greys and blacks. Foschia also took inspiration for the palette from the colour systems of iconic Swiss-French architect Le Corbusier, 'who used colour to enhance the emotions of people in his buildings', harnessing custom paints from Australian specialists Porter's Paints.

Sydney's creative families were another key influence for Foschia, including local interior designer Marion Hall Best (whose career from the mid-1930s celebrated bold colour, pattern and modernism), late artist Brett Whiteley (who famously painted the harbour in ultramarine hues), veteran artist John Olsen (known for his love of nature, greens and blues), and his daughter Louise Olsen and son-in-law Stephen Ormandy's homewares/jewellery brand Dinosaur Designs (beloved for its sleek forms and vibrant hues).

BELOW: Up on the first floor, Jardan's modernist-inspired, contemporary furniture is flanked by a fireplace and backdropped by airy views; Rugs and cushions are displayed on the lower ground floor, styled with a dark-grey sofa as a living zone

Melbourne-born, family firm Jardan sells Australian-designed and-made furniture and lighting, crafted using local materials to exemplary eco standards. Its own-label contemporary collections are displayed alongside a brilliant edit of art and accessories, from tableware to coffee-table books, rugs to vases. After closing its original Sydney showroom in Rosebery, Jardan launched a recent pop-up in Paddington, before finding a permanent home in Oxford Street's 1924-founded Alderstein House, an Art Deco building formerly occupied by Ariel Booksellers.

Styled like a home, the stunning flagship features dedicated zones for living, sleeping, dining and cooking – an alluring curved shelving area displays print titles, ceramics and plants, while upstairs there's an entertainer's kitchen – with lofty views over the harbour. Connecting the lower ground floor, ground floor and first floor is the eye-catching central staircase, flanked by sensual surface materials. Art is a highlight, especially Australian talent Kate Ballis' kooky-coloured 'Infra Realism' photos of America's palm-dotted landscape, pools and modernist architecture. You can even pick up a Maren surfboard. Only in Sydney...
www.jardan.com.au

BELOW: Blue-and-rust-grained marble etched with the Jardan logo forms the store's impressive entry wall (signage was created in collaboration with Seasaw studio); A sleek modern first-floor kitchen showcases tableware and vessels by local makers

Jardan Sydney is at 42 Oxford Street Paddington, Sydney. Click here for details of Jardan's Melbourne and Brisbane stores, also designed by IF Architecture

Pictures: Sean Fennessy

Moooi London

Daring Dutch design brand Moooi has launched a playful new London flagship store. Shop till you pop!

BY DEE IVA

The world of Dutch design has touched down in London with the launch of the striking new Moooi showroom in the heart of the West End. Having vacated its previous riverside premises on Bankside, the flamboyant, super-contemporary label, co-founded by Marcel Wanders, has moved to Great Titchfield Street in Fitzrovia. Home to brands such as Fritz Hansen and Ligne Roset, the area is fast becoming the destination of choice for international design brands looking for a London base.

Moooi's signature collections, past and present, are on show here, promising 'Rebellious Harmony'. Classic pieces like Bertjan Pot's 'Heracleum' lights are joined by Arihiro Miyake's new 'Coppélia' wire LED chandelier and stellar designs from the new Moooi Carpets collection, including dark floral 'Fool's Paradise' by Wanders (below). Also to celebrate the opening of the Fiztrovia store, Nika Zupanc's pretty 'Lolita' lamp has been reissued as a special edition in dusky pink, dubbed 'London Rosé'. 

Look out for British talent too, with established designer Ross Lovegrove contributing bold new rugs to Moooi, and London-born fresh face Umut Yamac creating the brilliant bird-shaped 'Perch' light for this year's Milan fair. 'Mooi' means 'beautiful' in Dutch; Moooi's extra o proves they take it to the extreme...
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Moooi is at 23 Great Titchfield Street, London W1

ABOVE RIGHT: Moooi co-founder Marcel Wanders prepares to give his opening speech at the Moooi London launch party
BELOW: Covetable furniture, lighting, rugs and accessories in the dramatic new Moooi London store

George Byrne – ‘Local Division’

For colour and architecture inspiration, we’re wowed by photographer George Byrne’s striking shots of Los Angeles…

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Australian photographer George Byrne captures the graphic shapes and colours of Los Angeles’ streetscapes in his new exhibition ‘Local Division’, currently showing at Sydney gallery Olsen Irwin.

Born in Sydney in 1976, Byrne started out studying painting but discovered photography in his late teens. He graduated from the Sydney College of the Arts in 2001 before settling in LA in 2010, where he has concentrated on his photographic practice.

Architecture fans will love the clean-lined buildings, snapped both from a distance and in geometric detail, some flat, two-dimensional planes, others textural and almost painterly. Some images feel abstract and becalmed, with a sculptural still-life quality. Street furniture from posts to parking signs and lights adds to the static feel (imagine late Adelaide artist Jeffrey Smart’s vibrant urban paintings transformed to photos).

Byrne’s palette is beautiful, portraying a dreamy mix of soft pastels – minty greens, dusky pinks and baby blues – contrasted with primary yellows, reds and cooler cobalts. Colour pops up on painted roofs and pavement edging, stripy wall tiles and vibrant doors, strings of balloons and a doughnut-like inflatable ring bobbing in a turquoise hotel pool.

ABOVE: 'Temple St', 2015
ABOVE RIGHT: 'Motel Grand', 2014
BELOW FROM LEFT: 'Hotel Pool #1', 2015; 'Green and White #2', 2015; all archival pigment prints, editions of five

Byrne has a way with shadows too, incorporating their intrusive shapes, especially those of LA’s trademark palm trees, often cut-off in unexpected ways. Perhaps it’s his Australian roots, as the harsh light in his homeland is equally blinding. Bright modernist exteriors are backdropped by faded signs and retro typography, conveying a bitter-sweet sense of nostalgia.

ABOVE: 'Ace Hotel Sth Broadway', 2015

This being LA, hotels and motels get their hour in the sun too, including a vertiginous view looking down from the Ace Hotel Downtown on South Broadway. Yet it’s not the glamorous parts of the city that seem to interest Byrne, rather the run-down, neglected and unsung quarters of town. And in a city where everyone drives, shots of empty streets are animated by the rare pedestrians walking, lonesome in an Edward Hopper-esque way, including one sporting a cinematic cowboy hat (real life or film set?).

ABOVE FROM TOP: '99c Silverlake', 2015; 'Cowboy', 2015

‘Borrowing from the clean, vivid clarity of modernist painting, Byrne references the New Topographics photography movement via a subject matter firmly entrenched in the urban everyday,’ states Byrne’s CV. His work ‘spins LA’s most disposable architecture and redundant landscapes into seismic moments. He seeks the subliminal and sublime in the everyday.’ Early influences included artists Piet Mondrian, Richard Diebenkorn, David Hockney and Jeffrey Smart; photographers Walker Evans, William Eggleston, Stephen Shore and Andreas Gursky were also creative inspirations.

All the ‘Local Division’ shots are archival pigment prints, in editions of five with two artist’s proofs. Sizes are large, but smaller options are available on request. You can also follow Byrne’s gallery on Instagram (@george_byrne), which he uses as a visual scrapbook.
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George Byrne’s ‘Local Division’ series is on show at Olsen Irwin, 63 Jersey Road, Woollahra, Sydney until 28 February 2016; free entry.