Melbourne Design Week 2019 – 6 Must-Sees

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This year’s Melbourne Design Week offers a thought-provoking mix of exhibitions, talks and tours. Take a peek…

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

2019’s Melbourne Design Week features more than 200 exhibitions, talks, tours, films and workshops, with events across town and in neighbouring city Geelong. Running from 14 to 24 March, Melbourne’s largest festival programme to date celebrates both local and international talent, with the core theme of ‘Design Experiments’ – asking how design can shape the future. A mix of ticketed and free activities embrace diverse challenges from the environment to social issues and materials. This year’s festival wraps up on Sunday, but many of the inspiring shows continue beyond the weekend. Here are six of our top FizzPicks…

‘SOMEWHERE OTHER’: JOHN WARDLE ARCHITECTS
Ground Level/Foyer, NGV Australia, Federation Square
Until 28 July (10am-5pm, free)

Visitors are invited to peek through five portals within timber and steel structure ‘Somewhere Other’, a compact, interactive experience by Melbourne practice John Wardle Architects. At NGV Australia until late July, this intriguing installation was first shown as part of 2018’s 16th International Architecture Exhibition at the Venice Architecture Biennale (pictured, top and above). Each of the wooden volumes, voids and apertures in its interconnected series frames views of the studio’s projects, the Australian landscape or the craft of collaborators including artist Natasha Johns-Messenger and filmmakers Coco and Maximilian.

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‘NEW VOLUMES BY ARTEDOMUS’: AN INSTALLATION BY FIONA LYNCH AND THOMAS COWARD
TDF Gallery, 14 Little Oxford Street, Collingwood
Until 24 March (11am-5pm, free)

We’re big fans of Artedomus’s ‘New Volumes’ collection, which showcases solid marble homewares by eight Australian designers. This Collingwood exhibition, curated by interior designer Fiona Lynch and designer Thomas Coward, represents the range in an installation that follows the journey of this sculptural material from the ‘ground to the house’, contrasted with a series of chunky marble plinths.

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‘MATERIAL THOUGHT’
Modern Times, 311 Smith Street, Fitzroy
Until 24 March (see link for times, free)

Presented by Fitzroy interiors store Modern Times, group exhibition ‘Material Thought’ explores material through the work of innovative Australian designers. On show are furniture, lighting and objects by nine top talents, including Henry Wilson (‘Stone Surface Sconce’, in Calacatta Marble, above), Coco Flip and Christopher Boots, all illuminating themes of design experimentation and sustainability.

’CLEMENT MEADMORE: THE ART OF MID-CENTURY DESIGN’
Ian Potter Museum of Art, University of Melbourne, Swanston Street
Until 24 March (see link for times, free)

Fans of modernism will enjoy exhibition ‘Clement Meadmore: The art of mid-century design’, a homage to the acclaimed Australian talent. The first major survey of Meadmore’s industrial design practice, it explores the inspirations that shaped the renowned sculptor’s early career as a designer. Part of a new wave of Australian design in the Fifties and Sixties, Meadmore championed streamlined forms, fresh materials and new manufacturing processes. His furniture and lighting appeared in the houses of iconic architect Robin Boyd, with well known designs such as his 1951 corded dining chair on view at the Ian Potter Museum of Art.

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‘WELCOME TO WASTELAND’
Compound Interest, 15-25 Keele Street, Collingwood
Until 24 March (11am-5pm, free)

Presented by Friends & Associates, ‘Welcome to Wasteland’ shares the work of cutting-edge local talents involved with sustainable design. Featuring architects, industrial designers, furniture makers and researchers, the show explores the potential of waste materials recycled into fresh, eco-friendly products. Typically innovative is Vert Design’s ‘HuskeeCup’ made from coffee husk waste, their collaboration with Spark & Burnish to craft ‘Marine Debris Bakelite Door Knobs’, and Maddison Ryder’s use of discarded Iceberg lettuce to form ‘Lettuce Eat’ disposable plates. Other materials in the mix include waste glass, ceramic, plastic, oyster shells, rubber bands, paper pulp, denim jeans, pigs’ blood and even golf balls!

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WORK SHOP: FIONA LYNCH
7 Glasshouse Road, Collingwood
Until 24 March (see link for times, free)

A curatorial showcase of experimental design, fine art and objects, interior designer Fiona Lynch’s new permanent gallery Work Shop aims to celebrate work by Australian and international designers and artists, as well as doubling as a testing ground for her own studio’s practice. For Melbourne Design Week, the debut show curates a selection of pieces examining the tension between resolved and incomplete elements, including ceramics by Olivia Walker (black porcelain collapsed vessel, above), burnt wood bowls by Makiko Ryujin, paintings by Jiaxin Nong and lighting design by Mary Wallis.

www.ngv.vic.gov.au/melbourne-design-week
Melbourne Design Week 2019 runs until Sunday 24 March at venues across the city and Geelong

Sydney Design Festival 2019 – 5 Must-Sees

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Sydney Design Festival 2019 brings inspiring exhibitions, talks and workshops to town. Here are five Fizz faves for getting your design on!

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Sydney Design Festival is back for 2019, unpacking new design, sharing emerging and established talents, and tackling design challenges. This year’s theme is ‘Accessing Design’, making design accessible to fresh audiences, with the action spread beyond the obvious inner-city hot spots. Running from 1 to 10 March – but with many shows lasting longer – the festival also shines a light on local design, including indigenous creativity, hosting events from exhibitions to talks, workshops, open studios, screenings and parties. Here are five of our #SDF19 Fizz faves…

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TOP: Sydney Design Festival keynote speaker Rachel Wingfield of Loop.pH with a range of dynamic past projects. ABOVE: Loop.pH’s ‘Arborescence’ installation for 2014’s Amsterdam Light Festival, proposing a future hybrid of trees and street lighting harnessing the studio’s signature bio-luminescence. Think sustainable ‘living lighting’

FESTIVAL KEYNOTE: RACHEL WINGFIELD OF LOOP.PH
Powerhouse Museum, 500 Harris Street, Ultimo
8 March (6pm-8pm)

London designer Rachel Wingfield, co-founder with Mathias Gmachl of Loop.pH, will give the festival keynote speech at Ultimo’s Powerhouse Museum. Launched in 2003, their spatial laboratory is known for cross-disciplinary designs that combine digital, light, art and craft details, often in public spaces. Exploring design, architecture and science, Loop.pH’s intriguing installations and experiences harness diverse materials from LEDs, electro-luminous fibres and NASA’s reflective silver mylar to carbon, bamboo and algae. Buy tickets to the talk online or check out Wingfield’s collaborative workshop ‘Archilace’ on Sunday 10 March (3pm-5pm).

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ABOVE: Mungo Scott Flour Mill, historic home to authentic Australian design showcase ‘Home.Grown’ in Summer Hill

HOME.GROWN//DISCOVERING AUSTRALIAN DESIGN
Mungo Scott Flour Mill, 2 Smith Street, Summer Hill
8-10 March

A three-day celebration of Australian furniture, lighting and home furnishings, ‘Home.Grown’ is presented by the Authentic Design Alliance and curated by its director Anne-Maree Sargeant. Expect three halls over two levels featuring exhibitions, installations and pop-ups, championing locally designed and made products and homegrown talents. All up you’ll discover around 175 designers and 100 brands. Ground Floor Hall 1 features a combined showcase of designers and smaller independent brands, spanning innovative lighting by Lumil, rugs by Designer Rugs and stylish storage by Sagitine, alongside a pop-up mini mart of Australian homewares available to buy from top3 by design. Installations occupy Ground Floor Hall 2, including ‘Undervalued’ by Nick Rennie, ‘Project Replica’ by Mitch Tobin, ‘Brand a Fake’ by ADA, ‘Used by 3018’ by Will Thompson, a Mercedes-Benz Design Award display and atmospheric photos of the historic venue itself. Upstairs, the First Floor Gallery presents curated zones by 10 established Australian design brands, including Nau, Catapult, Didier, Furnished Forever and Artedomus (‘New Volumes’). Talks, starring talents including Adam Goodrum, Adam Cornish and Christina Bricknell, tackle issues affecting the country’s design scene. The location is a wow too, with the event taking over the 1922 Mungo Scott Flour Mill. A free preview afternoon on Friday 8 March is by RSVP only; for the weekend, buy advance tickets cheaper online or snap them up at the door.

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ABOVE: Trent Jansen’s ‘Tidal Lounger’ chairs and ‘Tidal Coffee Table’, made from premium stainless steel wire for Australian outdoor living brand Tait, feature in ADC’s exhibition ‘Steel’

STEEL: ART DESIGN ARCHITECTURE
Australian Design Centre, 101-115 William Street, Darlinghurst
Until 3 April (closed Sundays and Mondays)

Discover the innovative ways artists, designers and architects are using steel in the 21st century at this major touring exhibition from Adelaide’s JamFactory. Free to visit at Darlinghurst’s Australian Design Centre, it showcases the work of 29 Australian creatives, including Korban/Flaubert’s bold steel sculptures, Trent Jansen’s wave-inspired ‘Tidal’ outdoor furniture collection for Tait, and BVN’s graphic Australian PlantBank research building at Mount Annan in New South Wales. A selection of steely works is also displayed across the road at Stylecraft’s showroom (24/100 William Street). Fancy some craft shopping? ADC hosts a Makers Market on Saturday 9 March (10am-4pm), featuring more than 27 local makers.

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ABOVE: ‘Purple with Black, White and Blue’ photo (detail) by Jon Setter, part of the artist’s exhibition ‘The Urban Text’ at design store Koskela

JON SETTER: THE URBAN TEXT
Koskela, 1/85 Dunning Avenue, Rosebery
Until 31 March

This series of 12 minimal photographs explores the unnoticed aspects of urban environments and our everyday streetscapes. Detroit-born, Sydney-based Jon Setter’s free exhibition ‘The Urban Text’ is on show at inspiring design store Koskela in Rosebery, so call in for a culture fix, then stick around to shop for Australian-made furniture, homewares and accessories. The artworks are available to buy as unframed prints in three sizes, and their abstract, graphic, simple, colour-block style will look a treat on your wall. Feeling peckish? Three Blue Ducks cafe shares this atmospheric former factory space.

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ABOVE: Bernabei Freeman’s contemporary ceramic ‘Hybrid Vessel’ (2018), incorporating 3D-printed ABS and handwoven rattan, is part of digital craft show ‘Femufacture’ at The Japan Foundation

FEMUFACTURE: JAPANESE AND AUSTRALIAN DESIGN
The Japan Foundation Gallery, Level 4, Central Park, 28 Broadway, Chippendale
Until 30 March (closed Sundays)

Lovers of craft and design will enjoy cutting-edge exhibition ‘Femufacture’, which explores the interface of craft traditions and digital fabrication technologies. Hosted by The Japan Foundation Gallery, upstairs in Chippendale’s Central Park mall, it features new works by Japanese and Australian women including 3D-printed ceramic and hand-woven rattan vessels by Melbourne’s Bernabei Freeman (Rina Bernabei and Kelly Freeman). Mediums include weaving, wood turning, indigo-dyeing, paper cut, silversmithing and knitting, combined with 3D printing, CNC machining, coding and robotics. The show also includes wearable technology by light artist Erina Kashihara, who joins the gallery’s free panel discussion to mark International Women’s Day (8 March, 6.30pm-8pm).

sydneydesign.com.au/2019

Sydney Design Festival 2019 runs until Sunday 10 March at venues across the city, but many events continue beyond this weekend. For more inspiration check out SDF’s suggested itineraries, from free and family-friendly ideas to sustainable thinking and design after dark.

20th Biennale of Sydney

Ming Wong, 'Windows On The World (Part 1)', 2014, mixed media installation with video. Courtesy of Para Site and Spring Workshop, Hong Kong. Photograph_ Glenn Eugen Ellingsen.JPG

Packed with contemporary art and installations, the 20th Biennale of Sydney still has two more weekends to go. Navigate the maze with our fave FizzPicks…

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Every two years the Harbour City gets its art on, with the free Biennale of Sydney taking over town. Running until 5 June 2016, the 20th edition unveils work by 83 artists from 35 countries across seven major venues, dubbed ‘Embassies of Thought’, as well as a string of in-between fringe spaces. Around 70 per cent of artists are showing new commissions, many of them site-specific.

Under the artistic direction of Dr Stephanie Rosenthal, Chief Curator of London's Hayward Gallery, the 2016 theme is based on a quote by US sci-fi author William Gibson: ‘The future is already here – it’s just not evenly distributed.’ Inspired by the idea that access to information technology is still uneven globally, leading to a new poverty gap, the Biennale aims to address the time we’re living in now, as well as imagining where we're going. 'I conceived the venues as Embassies of Thought,' said Rosenthal. 'Each entwined and connected.' So while the Embassy of the Real deals with ways we perceive reality in the digital age, the Embassy of Disappearance 'explores how languages and cultures are disappearing' and the Embassy of Transition engages with the cycles of life and death.

With a blizzard of art up for grabs, even culture-vultures may get overwhelmed. Luckily, our FizzPicks offer edited highlights…

ABOVE: Ming Wong, 'Windows On The World (Part 1)', 2014, mixed-media installation with video
BELOW: Charwei Tsai, 'Spiral Incense: Hundred Syllable Mantra', 2016, spiral incense made of herbal materials

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Mortuary Station: Embassy of Transition
Regent Street, Chippendale
Grab the chance to inspect the interior of Chippendale's Victorian Mortuary Station, an atmospheric heritage-listed former funeral station once used to transport coffins and mourners by rail to Rookwood Cemetery. Taiwanese artist Charwei Tsai’s ritualistic ‘Spiral Incense’ installation sees smoking incense coils suspended over the prettily tiled platform, hand-inscribed with Buddhist mantras. Video art projected onto the waiting room floors ruminates on the impermanence of life. Outside, aviaries by London artist Marco Chiandetti host live birds pecking at classical sculpture body parts in an unnerving investigation of spirituality. Gothic or what?

BELOW: Jamie North, 'Succession', 2016, mixed materials; Lee Mingwei, 'Guernica in Sand', 2006 and 2015, mixed-media interactive installation

Carriageworks: Embassy of Disappearance
245 Wilson Street, Eveleigh
It’s hard for any art to compete with jaw-dropping former rail yards Carriageworks, but Sydney-based Jamie North’s sculpture-meets-nature installation ‘Succession’ rises like a biological wonder in this cavernous warehouse. Combining industrial waste products (cement, steel, steel slag, coal ash) with native Australian plants, organic matter and oyster shells, his karst-like cast-concrete forms incorporate miniature landscapes, riffing on distressed architecture. NY-based Taiwanese talent Lee Mingwei’s ‘Guernica in Sand’ – a transitory sand art piece taking its cue from Picasso’s iconic anti-war painting – may have been brushed away, but its blurry swirls of yellow, grey and white still hold a strange beauty.

BELOW: Lee Bul, 'Willing To Be Vulnerable', 2015-16, mixed materials; Korakrit Arunanondchai, 'Painting with history in a room filled with people with funny names 3', 2015-16, HD video, denim, foam, wood; William Forsythe, 'Nowhere and Everywhere at the Same Time, no.2', 2013, plumb bobs, string, compressed air cylinders, aluminium frames

Cockatoo Island: Embassy of the Real
Sydney Harbour
One of the strongest Biennale clusters, Cockatoo Island displays work surrounded by the eery ruins of Sydney’s convict, industrial and ship-building heritage. In the industrial sector, we liked Architecturally-influenced Korean artist Lee Bul’s huge, futuristic ‘Willing To Be Vulnerable’ installation, which mashed up metalised and transparent film, heavy-duty fabric, LED lighting, a fog machine, zeppelin-like inflatables and an ethereal air balloon in a bold red, white and black palette. Inspired by urban, eco and anti-authoritarian spiritual themes, Thai artist Korakrit Arunanondchai’s video of Bangkok life was powerfully immersive, but we couldn’t help appreciating the midnight blue-and-white dyed denim floor cushions for the lounging audience. Frankfurt-based American William Forsythe’s mesmerising kinetic work ‘Nowhere and Everywhere at the Same Time’ fills a distressed space with swinging strings, weighted down with plumb bobs, allowing viewers to interact with the movement. Shanghai's Xu Zhen deconstructs classical and Buddhist sculptures in a monumental work tackling the past, while Singapore's Ming Wong assembles a bank of video screens to show his own vibrant, kooky sci-fi films.

BELOW: Chiharu Shiota, 'Conscious Sleep', 2009/2016, beds, thread; Bharti Kher, 'Six Women', 2013-15, plaster of paris, wood, metal; Cevdet Erek, 'Room of Rhythms – Long Distance Relationship', 2016, mixed media and architectural additions

Taking over a heritage convict barracks, Japanese artist Chiharu Shiota's spooky 'Conscious Sleep' installation is a wow, tangling old, upended dormitory beds in a spider's web of black threads. For subtle work 'Piedra en el Zapato', Colombia's Miguel Angel Rojas has crafted a fake, geometric-tiled floor from lime, charcoal powder and mixed materials in an old convict building. New Delhi-based Londoner Bharti Kher peoples an old room with touching nude plaster sculptures in 'Six Women'. By contrast, Turkish artist Cevdet Erek's 'Room of Rhythms – Long Distance Relationship' fills a ruined structure with sound art beats, emanating from black boxes.

BELOW: Sheila Hicks, 'The Embassy of Chromatic Delegates', 2015-16, sculptural elements, various fabrics, bamboo; Taro Shinoda, 'Abstraction of Confusion', 2016, clay, pigment, ochre, tatami mats; Nyapanyapa Yunupingu, 'Bathala', 2012, natural earth pigments on hollow log

Art Gallery of New South Wales: Embassy of Spirits
Art Gallery Road, Sydney
If colour and texture turn you on, then hit the Art Gallery of NSW for American artist Sheila Hicks’ sculptural ensemble ‘The Embassy of Chromatic Delegates’. Vibrant linen, cotton, nylon, polyester, bamboo and wood combine to form a dazzling acid-bright work (imagine this painterly palette used for high-impact rugs, wallpaper or cushions). Hicks’ acrylic-fibre ‘The Questioning Column’ hangs on the gallery’s facade, draped around a classical column like a rainbow waterfall. A world away, Tokyo’s Taro Shinoda channels minimal, neutral-hued interiors, with his ‘Abstraction of Confusion’, a simple tatami-mat platform that embraces simplicity and meditation. Shinoda’s hand-built installations and contemplative sculptural works are informed by karesansui, traditional Japanese garden design. Yirrkala-born indigenous artist Nyapanyapa Yunupingu’s forest of logs almost has an oriental quality; stripped-back nature meets graphic mark-making.

BELOW: Nine Beier, 'Allegory of Charity', 2015, ceramic cups, coffee beans, resin, wood, metal; Céline Condorelli, 'Structure for Communicating with Wind', from the series 'Additionals', 2012-13/2016, metallicised space blanket, curtain tape

Museum of Contemporary Art Australia: Embassy of Translation
140 George Street, The Rocks
Danish artist Nina Beier caught our eye at the MCA with her striking installation ‘Allegory of Charity’, a series of suspended ceramic cups pouring coffee beans onto ‘Tileables’, a patchwork floor of outsize ceramic tiles. Think T.S. Eliot’s poem ‘The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock’: 'I have measured out my life in coffee spoons'. French talent Céline Condorelli’s fluttering gold curtain, ‘Structure for Communicating with Wind’, draws on architecture and notions of support, with a metallicised space blanket wafting in space.

Artspace: Embassy of Non-Participation
43-51 Cowper Wharf Road, Woolloomooloo
A former artists’ squat turned experimental gallery, Artspace is showing London artist duo Karen Mirza and Brad Butler, including neon work ‘You are the Prime Minister’, backdropped by plush red curtains.

ABOVE: Karen Mirza/Brad Butler, 'You are the Prime Minister', 2014, neon
BELOW: Daniel Boyd, 'What Remains', 2016, site-specific installation, mirrored dots, synthetic polymer paint; Keg de Souza, 'We Built This City' installation, 2016, tents, tarps, hessian sacks, mixed media; Bo Christian Larsson, 'Fade Away, Fade Away, Fade Away,' 2016, mixed-media and performative installation

In-between Spaces
Scattered around town, fringe installations and acts also beckon, especially in the inner-west. One of our favourites is at Redfern Wall on the corner of Vine and Eveleigh streets near aboriginal heartland The Block. ‘What Remains’, by Sydney Kudjila/Gangalu artist Daniel Boyd, is a site-specific constellation of 12,000 mirrored dots covering a chunky corner of wall, backed by black paint. It shimmers and sparkles, reflecting passersby, and looks inky black or midnight blue depending on the light. For 'We Built This City', Perth-born Keg de Souza constructs a patchwork tent dwelling on Redfern's Vine Street. Wrapping up, literally, on a deathly note, Swede Bo Christian Larsson’s ‘Fade Away, Fade Away, Fade Away’ sees gravestones in Newtown’s Camperdown Cemetery covered in white fabric, creating ghostly sculptures from found-objects. Whipped up in his on-site workshop, they look not unlike pale Scandi chair covers. Who said art and decor can't be bedfellows?

The 20th Biennale of Sydney runs at citywide venues until Sunday 5 June 2016
biennaleofsydney.com.au

LDF 2015 – 10 London Design Festival Highlights

It may be the last day of London Design Festival 2015, but here are 10 top FizzPicks to end on a high...

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

So, the London Design Festival draws to a close this Sunday 27 September, but you can still cram a hell of a lot into just one day. With seven design districts beckoning, from Bankside, Brompton and Brixton to Clerkenwell, Shoreditch, Islington, Chelsea and Queens Park, there's plenty on offer. Here are 10 of our favourite shows and installations from this talent-packed week to tempt you to hit town for one last hurrah...

Walala in da House at Aria Islington Design District
Fans of East London designer Camille Walala's ultra-bright, bold geometric street art – a hit from Shoreditch to Sydney – will love her show 'Walala in da House' in the Islington Design District. Walala's trademark Pop-tribal digital prints look equally at home in her interiors range, exclusive to Aria store, featuring armchairs and shelving, graphic cushions, prints and ceramics. Walala (above) collaborated on the furniture with local designer-maker Dale Kirk and on the ceramics with innovative Stoke-on-Trent potters Flux (CoBaltum). It's like Memphis went raving, and we're up for joining the party.
Aria, Barnsbury Hall, Barnsbury Street, Islington, London N1
camillewalala.com  ariashop.co.uk


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A Bullet from a Shooting Star by Alex Chinneck Greenwich Peninsula
Combining surrealism with spectacle, British sculptor Alex Chinneck has created 'A Bullet from a Shooting Star' out on Greenwich Peninsula, an area being developed for new housing. Don't worry, it's not a collapsed electricity facility. Chinneck has a knack for making the everyday extraordinary, and his 35-metre upside down steel pylon looks like it was shot into earth at a radical angle. Acting as an arrow to the neighbourhood, and a reminder of its industrial past, it's a star at LDF15 (the views from Emirates Air Line cable car are great). Also catch companion exhibition 'Straight Jacket Star Jumps' at nearby NOW Gallery, which sees a 20-metre pylon coiled bizarrely into a seven-metre-high space.
Greenwich Peninsula, London SE10
alexchinneck.com  greenwichpeninsula.co.uk  nowgallery.co.uk


Momentum by Fredrikson Stallard Holborn
It may look like a boulder from the Red Planet, but this Mars-esque marvel is actually the squishy 'Species' sofa, formed from polyurethane, glass fibre and polyester coated in red velvet by design-art duo Fredrikson Stallard. It's on show at their theatrical Holborn HQ/home as part of their 'Momentum' selling exhibition, spanning experimental furniture, sculpture, product and print. Supported by David Gill Gallery, it includes one-off and edition pieces themed around bronze, steel and ice.
Fredrikson Stallard, 10A Warner Street, London EC1
fredriksonstallard.com  davidgillgallery.co.uk


Barber Osgerby Lanterns at Twentytwentyone Islington Design District
Fans of George Nelson's iconic pendants and Isamu Noguchi's 'Akari' light sculptures will love these contemporary new 'Hotaru' lanterns by Brit duo Barber Osgerby, launched at exclusive distributor Twentytwentyone in Islington Design District. Drawing on the traditional heritage of Japanese lantern-making, they're manufactured by Oseki using translucent handmade Mulberry bark paper stretched over a bamboo frame. Named after the Japanese word for 'firefly', they come in two shapes; 'Buoy' (above), inspired by the maritime markers, and 'Double Bubble', which fuses twin spheres. We think they look great in groups.
Twentytwentyone, 274-275 Upper Street, London N1
barberosgerby.com  twentytwentyone.com


Donna Wilson SCP Editions at SCP Shoreditch Design Triangle
Serious design is all well and good, but sometimes only a ceramic critter will do. Fans of Brit designer Donna Wilson's cute animals motifs, usually seen on cushions, tableware and throws, will love her new earthenware 'Bear' and 'Bird' designs, part of SCP's small-batch SCP Editions released for LDF15 in the Shoreditch Design Triangle. Based on Wilson's illustrations, they're hand-painted and glazed in Stoke-on-Trent, and are available in various colours. SCP is also launching six sofas by six different designers for 'Sofa in Sight', including the minimal boxy 'Rochester' by lighting whizz Michael Anastassiades.
SCP East, 135-139 Curtain Road, London EC2
donnawilson.com  scp.co.uk


Twisting Tradition at Mint Brompton Design District
South Kensington store Mint, in the Brompton Design District, is known for its sharp, eclectic edits of the best new design. Discover cutting-edge and curious craft pieces in their LDF show 'Twisting Tradition', including Japanese brand Nendo's 'Tokyo Tribal' collection of chairs and tables for Singaporean firm Industry Plus, which incorporate woven baskets as supports and storage.
Mint, 2 North Terrace, Alexander Square, London SW3 (until 30 September)
mintshop.co.uk  nendo


Lenneke Wispelwey at SMUG Islington Design District
Dutch ceramicist Lenneke Wispelwey's contemporary new porcelain tableware teams sherbet colours and geometric patterns. In residence at Islington design store SMUG, she'll be launching new pieces, including the 'Pour Darling Jug''Fat Lady' and 'Queen Mother' vases.
SMUG, 13 Camden Passage, Islington, London N1
lennekewispelwey.com  ifeelsmug.com


Pinch: Nim at Pinch Shoreditch Design Triangle
We're longtime admirers of British furniture label Pinch (Russell Pinch and Oona Bannon), whose sleek wooden designs always turn heads. In a new departure, though, the studio has launched its new limited edition 'Nim' table made from Jesmonite, channelling lava strata, stone and the weather. It looks like something forged from the natural world, not a man-made object; we want! Although their shop is in Clapham, their LDF show is at the Rochelle School in the Shoreditch Design Triangle, and includes elegant offerings such as the 'Leta' chaise and 'Eugene' table.
Pinch show, First Floor, Rochelle School, Arnold Circus, London E2
pinchdesign.com


Tom Dixon: Multiplex by Tom Dixon Old Selfridges Hotel
Brit design star Tom Dixon and Wallpaper magazine present Multiplex, a playful take on an immersive, multi-sensory shopping mall, at the Old Selfridges Hotel behind Selfridges department store. Drawing on look, scent, sound, touch and taste, it includes design, technology, fashion, film and interiors, exploring ways in which we might encounter retail environments in the future. Under pressure from online shopping and rising rents for bricks and mortar, traditional stores need to reinvent themselves in the digital age. Shop till you drop at this trendsetting pop-up, which offers bespoke products, unique services and potent experiences, as well as new lighting, furniture and accessories from Dixon.
Multiplex, Old Selfridges Hotel, 1 Orchard Street, London W1 (until 15 October)
tomdixon.net/uk/multiplex


Darkroom is Five – 5 Years / 5 Products / 5 Shapes Bloomsbury
Circle, triangle, square, semi-circle, ziggurat. Directional design store Darkroom celebrates five years in business by launching five new products focused on five bold shapes. Expect 'Bauhaus Alphabet Pendants' from their first jewellery range, hand-dipped 'Monochrome' enamelware tableware, 'Shapes Scented Candles' in charcoal or white tea (housed in reusable glass containers with cork tops), handwoven 'Kilims' and Welsh woven 'Shapes Blankets' in grey, black and white geometrics with vibrant accent stitching. Shape up!
Darkroom, 52 Lamb's Conduit Street, London WC1
darkroomlondon.com

The London Design Festival runs until Sunday 27 September 2015, although select shows continue longer; londondesignfestival.com

LDF 2015 – Eight Must-sees at Tent and Super Brands

Group shows Tent and Super Brands bring hot design talent to East London. Here are our eight FizzPicks...

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

London Design Festival 2015 is in full swing, but there's still time to cut a slice of the action. Twin shows Tent and Super Brands are at East London's cavernous Truman Brewery until Sunday 27 September, offering a smorgasbord of talent just a skip from Shoreditch Design Triangle.

Featuring more than 440 designers, from crafts names to bold brands from 29 countries, there's a bewildering amount to see. The exhibition is divided into independent, emerging talents at Tent, more established global labels at Super Brands, and national and craft exhibitions at Galleries and Country Showcases, from the Australian International Pavilion to Etsy UK: Four Corners of Craft. There's also a compact tech zone, Techable, and Super Talks 2015, including debates on colour trends and 2016's World Design Capital Taipei.

So, grab your pals, some comfy trainers and our guide to eight must-sees for design hunters... 

&New, Super Brands (S48, Hall SBL)
UK/Finnish contemporary furniture duo &New – aka Jo Wilton and Mirka Grohn – design vibrant, skinny steel furniture that throws great shapes. Think side tables, desks, consoles and clothes rails in pretty pastels and punchy primaries, manufactured in Blighty in small batches.
andnew.co.uk

Glassmania Bohemian Glass Masters, Gallery Events (SC10, Hall T2 2nd Floor)
We're taken with these reinvented tiffin containers in cut crystal with leather straps by Daniela Chodilova for Astera Glass, adding a luxurious touch to an everyday item. Czech glass is rightly famous, so swing by 'Glassmania' for a showcase of true Bohemian talent.
czechtrade.co.uk

Poiat, Super Brands (S16)
When it comes to sleek wooden seating, you've got to hand it to the Finns. Poiat is sharing its award-winning, shapely, moulded plywood 'Lavitta' chair collection, designed to slot into each other for striking storage. Also look out for group show 'Finnish Form', which presents 18 of the country's future-forward designers, brands and manufacturers, including the vibrant modern textiles and tableware of Jonna Saarinen (Hall T1, First Floor, Tent main building).
services.poiat.com 

Constancy and Change in Korean Traditional Craft, Gallery Events (T4, Hall A)
There's something strangely irresistible about these tactile paper vases by Lee Young Soon. Part of the 'Constancy and Change in Korean Traditional Craft' exhibit, presented by KCDF (Korean Craft and Design Foundation), they embody the theme of 'Su-Su, Deom-Deom, Eun-Eun' or 'Simple, Calm, Subtle.' There's 193 pieces of work by 23 artists in six craft categories covering metal, ceramics. lacquer, bamboo, paper and textiles, teaming tradition with modern grace.
kcdf.kr/eng

100% Norway, Gallery Events (Hall G4, Ground Floor)
100% Norway has added a twist to its curation, selecting prototypes and contemporary products from young Norwegian designers set against iconic mid-century and classic designs. We like the graphic 'Fauna' bookends by Hallgeir Homstvedt, formed from Nordic rock in the shape of a native fox, bullfinch, puffin and hedgehog. Slimline 'Duplé' tables and seats from Alexander Åsgård also get our vote, along with Siv Lier's oak-and-brass 'Spring' trays with arty disc-shaped mirrors and Andreas Bergsaker's covetable 'Blossom' accessories trays including two mirrors and a light. From the classics, don't miss the graphic 'Dokka' pendants by Birger Dahl for Northern Lighting and the white and sky-blue 'Hold' pots by Kristine Bjaadal for Magnor Glassverk. Touchy-feely treats.
100percentnorway.com

What Goes Behind... Contemporary Polish Ceramic Design, Gallery Events (C21, Hall T2)
Last year we were impressed by Tent's round-up of Polish graphic and product design, including retro-font-toting 'Mamsam' cups by Full Metal Jacket; this year, Contemporary Polish Ceramic Design is enjoying exposure. There's kooky, graphic work by Magdalena Lapinska, dreamy aqua 'Weeds' plates by Karina Marusinska and striking blue squiggly 'Oko' vases by Malwina Konopacka.
culture.pl

Maoli, Super Brands (S15)
Madagascan brand Maoli is showing off its architectural 'inConcrete' collection, including super-thin tables. Available in white, grey, rust and charcoal, the furniture and accessories can be used inside or out. Legs for the tall 'Jòto Bè' table detach for easier transport.
maoli-inconcrete.com

Sue Pryke, Tent London (F08, Hall T1)
Simple, contemporary and oh-so-shapely, the handcrafted ceramic tableware on Sue Pryke's stall will have you reaching for your chequebook at 'Hello!' Her slipcase terracotta cups and jugs may be familiar, combining white tin glaze over red earth clay, but there are some seductive new colours and forms on offer too, including gorgeous charcoal-grey vases. We love the indigo milk pourer and 'Mr & Mrs' water carafe, both in vitrified earthenware, and the 'Mr & Mrs' teaspoons.
suepryke.com

Lead photo and select others for 100% Norway by Siren Lauvdal.

Tent London and Super Brands London run until Sunday 27 September 2015 at Old Truman Brewery, Hanbury Street, London E1. Open 10am to 8pm; 11am to 6pm Sunday. Last entry 45 minutes before closing. Tickets available online or on the door; tentlondon.co.uk