Sydney Design Festival 2019 – 5 Must-Sees

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Sydney Design Festival 2019 brings inspiring exhibitions, talks and workshops to town. Here are five Fizz faves for getting your design on!

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Sydney Design Festival is back for 2019, unpacking new design, sharing emerging and established talents, and tackling design challenges. This year’s theme is ‘Accessing Design’, making design accessible to fresh audiences, with the action spread beyond the obvious inner-city hot spots. Running from 1 to 10 March – but with many shows lasting longer – the festival also shines a light on local design, including indigenous creativity, hosting events from exhibitions to talks, workshops, open studios, screenings and parties. Here are five of our #SDF19 Fizz faves…

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TOP: Sydney Design Festival keynote speaker Rachel Wingfield of Loop.pH with a range of dynamic past projects. ABOVE: Loop.pH’s ‘Arborescence’ installation for 2014’s Amsterdam Light Festival, proposing a future hybrid of trees and street lighting harnessing the studio’s signature bio-luminescence. Think sustainable ‘living lighting’

FESTIVAL KEYNOTE: RACHEL WINGFIELD OF LOOP.PH
Powerhouse Museum, 500 Harris Street, Ultimo
8 March (6pm-8pm)

London designer Rachel Wingfield, co-founder with Mathias Gmachl of Loop.pH, will give the festival keynote speech at Ultimo’s Powerhouse Museum. Launched in 2003, their spatial laboratory is known for cross-disciplinary designs that combine digital, light, art and craft details, often in public spaces. Exploring design, architecture and science, Loop.pH’s intriguing installations and experiences harness diverse materials from LEDs, electro-luminous fibres and NASA’s reflective silver mylar to carbon, bamboo and algae. Buy tickets to the talk online or check out Wingfield’s collaborative workshop ‘Archilace’ on Sunday 10 March (3pm-5pm).

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ABOVE: Mungo Scott Flour Mill, historic home to authentic Australian design showcase ‘Home.Grown’ in Summer Hill

HOME.GROWN//DISCOVERING AUSTRALIAN DESIGN
Mungo Scott Flour Mill, 2 Smith Street, Summer Hill
8-10 March

A three-day celebration of Australian furniture, lighting and home furnishings, ‘Home.Grown’ is presented by the Authentic Design Alliance and curated by its director Anne-Maree Sargeant. Expect three halls over two levels featuring exhibitions, installations and pop-ups, championing locally designed and made products and homegrown talents. All up you’ll discover around 175 designers and 100 brands. Ground Floor Hall 1 features a combined showcase of designers and smaller independent brands, spanning innovative lighting by Lumil, rugs by Designer Rugs and stylish storage by Sagitine, alongside a pop-up mini mart of Australian homewares available to buy from top3 by design. Installations occupy Ground Floor Hall 2, including ‘Undervalued’ by Nick Rennie, ‘Project Replica’ by Mitch Tobin, ‘Brand a Fake’ by ADA, ‘Used by 3018’ by Will Thompson, a Mercedes-Benz Design Award display and atmospheric photos of the historic venue itself. Upstairs, the First Floor Gallery presents curated zones by 10 established Australian design brands, including Nau, Catapult, Didier, Furnished Forever and Artedomus (‘New Volumes’). Talks, starring talents including Adam Goodrum, Adam Cornish and Christina Bricknell, tackle issues affecting the country’s design scene. The location is a wow too, with the event taking over the 1922 Mungo Scott Flour Mill. A free preview afternoon on Friday 8 March is by RSVP only; for the weekend, buy advance tickets cheaper online or snap them up at the door.

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ABOVE: Trent Jansen’s ‘Tidal Lounger’ chairs and ‘Tidal Coffee Table’, made from premium stainless steel wire for Australian outdoor living brand Tait, feature in ADC’s exhibition ‘Steel’

STEEL: ART DESIGN ARCHITECTURE
Australian Design Centre, 101-115 William Street, Darlinghurst
Until 3 April (closed Sundays and Mondays)

Discover the innovative ways artists, designers and architects are using steel in the 21st century at this major touring exhibition from Adelaide’s JamFactory. Free to visit at Darlinghurst’s Australian Design Centre, it showcases the work of 29 Australian creatives, including Korban/Flaubert’s bold steel sculptures, Trent Jansen’s wave-inspired ‘Tidal’ outdoor furniture collection for Tait, and BVN’s graphic Australian PlantBank research building at Mount Annan in New South Wales. A selection of steely works is also displayed across the road at Stylecraft’s showroom (24/100 William Street). Fancy some craft shopping? ADC hosts a Makers Market on Saturday 9 March (10am-4pm), featuring more than 27 local makers.

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ABOVE: ‘Purple with Black, White and Blue’ photo (detail) by Jon Setter, part of the artist’s exhibition ‘The Urban Text’ at design store Koskela

JON SETTER: THE URBAN TEXT
Koskela, 1/85 Dunning Avenue, Rosebery
Until 31 March

This series of 12 minimal photographs explores the unnoticed aspects of urban environments and our everyday streetscapes. Detroit-born, Sydney-based Jon Setter’s free exhibition ‘The Urban Text’ is on show at inspiring design store Koskela in Rosebery, so call in for a culture fix, then stick around to shop for Australian-made furniture, homewares and accessories. The artworks are available to buy as unframed prints in three sizes, and their abstract, graphic, simple, colour-block style will look a treat on your wall. Feeling peckish? Three Blue Ducks cafe shares this atmospheric former factory space.

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ABOVE: Bernabei Freeman’s contemporary ceramic ‘Hybrid Vessel’ (2018), incorporating 3D-printed ABS and handwoven rattan, is part of digital craft show ‘Femufacture’ at The Japan Foundation

FEMUFACTURE: JAPANESE AND AUSTRALIAN DESIGN
The Japan Foundation Gallery, Level 4, Central Park, 28 Broadway, Chippendale
Until 30 March (closed Sundays)

Lovers of craft and design will enjoy cutting-edge exhibition ‘Femufacture’, which explores the interface of craft traditions and digital fabrication technologies. Hosted by The Japan Foundation Gallery, upstairs in Chippendale’s Central Park mall, it features new works by Japanese and Australian women including 3D-printed ceramic and hand-woven rattan vessels by Melbourne’s Bernabei Freeman (Rina Bernabei and Kelly Freeman). Mediums include weaving, wood turning, indigo-dyeing, paper cut, silversmithing and knitting, combined with 3D printing, CNC machining, coding and robotics. The show also includes wearable technology by light artist Erina Kashihara, who joins the gallery’s free panel discussion to mark International Women’s Day (8 March, 6.30pm-8pm).

sydneydesign.com.au/2019

Sydney Design Festival 2019 runs until Sunday 10 March at venues across the city, but many events continue beyond this weekend. For more inspiration check out SDF’s suggested itineraries, from free and family-friendly ideas to sustainable thinking and design after dark.

LDF 2018 – 10 Unmissable FizzPicks for London Design Biennale

London Design Biennale is a must for design hunters, bringing inspiring global ideas to Somerset House

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

One of our top tips for London Design Festival, London Design Biennale gathers creatives from 40 countries, cities and territories across six continents at Somerset House, all responding to 2018’s theme of ‘Emotional States’. Exploring ideas through design, architecture and technology – addressing social, political and environmental challenges – the second edition is a thought-provoking showcase, running until 23 September.

Influential museums and institutions are among the curators, including London’s V&A (‘Maps of Defiance’), New York’s Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum (‘Face Values’) and Milan’s Triennale (‘L’Architettura degli Alberi’). All the participants are worth a look, but here are 10 of our favourite FizzPicks…

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AUSTRALIA: ‘Full Spectrum’
London-based Australian designer Flynn Talbot channels Australia’s recent referendum vote to legalise same-sex marriage with vibrant light installation ‘Full Spectrum’. A celebration of diversity, the ecstatic, immersive work incorporates an arcing curve of rainbow colour, inspired by the Pride flag, embracing the whole spectrum. Its suspended light screen is formed from 150 strands of fibre-optic light, each a different hue, using custom-made hidden LED modules and electronics. You can touch and move through the strands or simply feel the love.


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LATVIA: ‘Matter to Matter’
Visitors can leave fleeting messages on a wall of condensation at Latvia’s entry ‘Matter to Matter’, designed by Arthur Analts of Variant Studio, which shares the emotional impact of mark making. Taking its cue from the Baltic state’s humid climate, with capital Riga surrounded by forests and the sea, it’s a statement about culture, transience and nature’s power to reclaim human traces. Each message lasts only a few minutes on the green glass surface, before fading away. Complete with a wooden bench, the simple, sensory space won ‘Best Design Medal’ at the Biennale.


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LEBANON: ‘The Silent Room’
Escape from city stress in ‘The Silent Room’, Lebanon’s blue-hued retreat from the pressures of public space. Enter the perforated brick-and-timber tower and a staircase leads to a dimly lit upper level. Within this fabric-lined, insulated cocoon, speakers play a field recording of quiet urban moments. ‘Silence is becoming a commodity for the privileged,’ says designer Nathalie Harb, whose private shelter offers ‘the luxury of silence to everyone, regardless of background or status.’ Influenced by her crowded home city Beirut, she hopes her soundscape provides a sensory respite from the madding crowd.


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INDIA: ‘State of Indigo’
We love blue, especially dreamy indigo, but the dark history of indigo farming has remained mysterious. India’s pavilion, backed by The Gujral Foundation, illuminates the ‘State of Indigo’, sharing the colonial slavery and contemporary social issues behind this emotionally charged pigment. A natural colour created from the indigofera plant, indigo was used ‘to dye fabric, repel insects, treat ailments, disinfect, ward off spirits and even decorate an entire city’, says curator Priya Khanchandani, who wants us to experience the working conditions behind this blue beauty.


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GUATEMALA: ‘Palopó’
Pattern and colour can transform lives and economies as ‘Palopó’, Guatemala’s pavilion, proves. It promotes a project to paint a whole town in vibrant hues, inspired by local, ancestral textile patterns, turning it into a vast artwork to attract tourism. Led by designer Diego Olivero of Olivero & Bland Studio, Pintando Santa Catarina Palopó aims to support an impoverished town on Lake Atitlán. The London installation celebrates this social design initiative, harnessing floating geometric forms resembling the multi-coloured houses, flanked by a textile mobile by Zyle.


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GREECE: ‘ΑΝΥΠΑΚΟΗ – Disobedience’
Championing the ancient Greek concept of civil disobedience, Greece’s kinetic ‘ΑΝΥΠΑΚΟΗ’ installation challenges our perception of static architecture. Designed by Nassia Inglessis-led Studio INI, its 17-metre-long wall is formed from a steel spring skeleton and recycled plastic, so it flexes and morphs around the human body. Visitors can enjoy the transgressive walkway, passing through the wall and feeling it respond in return. A boundary, but also a rebellious, exciting space to explore, it suggests a new, more dynamic shape for future city buildings.


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ITALY: ‘L’Architettura degli Alberi’
Based on a 20-year study of trees, Italian pavilion ‘L’Architettura degli Alberi’ reflects a labour of love by architects Cesare Leonardi and studio partner Franca Stagi. The duo documented Italy’s trees to help landscape designers, crafting accurate, beautifully detailed drawings of different trees at a 1:100 scale. Expanding to include European and Central American trees, the book was finally published in 1982, featuring 374 evocative illustrations of 211 species. This installation presented by La Triennale di Milano shares 24 of them, ideal for inspiring parks and public spaces.


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EGYPT: ‘Modernist Indignation’
Winner of the London Design Biennale 2018 Medal, Egypt’s display ‘Modernist Indignation’ charts the sad loss of the country’s once-vaunted modernist architecture, now left to rot or actively destroyed by critics. The pavilion is an elegy to that vulnerable and dying design language, featuring a contemporary reinterpretation of a fictional 1939 exhibition put on by Al Emara, the first Arabic design magazine (published from 1939 to 1959). It also includes a video shot in the house of its founding architect Sayed Karim, his manifesto and logo, gradually erased on the floor.


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SWEDEN: ‘Coal: Post-Fuel’
Coal could have emotional value, becoming a desirable design material, according to this intriguing Swedish exhibit by Jesper Eriksson. ‘Coal: Post Fuel’ considers an alternative future for this Industrial Age power source, imagining its life beyond a dirty fuel for burning. His installation features furniture, flooring and objects made from solid coal, some in their raw state and other pieces processed into a black marble-like finish. Eriksson reckons ‘Britain’s most iconic material’ can be rebranded for architecture and interior design. Think organic, quarried luxury…


THE NETHERLANDS: ‘Power Plant’
Fearful about food security and the future environment? Luckily, The Netherlands is on top of things, with its ‘Power Plant’ pavilion showing how design can solve the problem of population-pressured food production. A futuristic greenhouse, it uses sunlight to generate both food and the electricity needed to grow it. Designer Marjan van Aubel is behind this elegant solution, with the building’s transparent solar glass, hydroponic system, vertical growth structure and specifically coloured LEDs fostering a year-round, high-yield indoor harvest.


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Finally, don’t miss The Refugees’ Pavilion, a temporary shelter housing objects designed by displaced people. The pavilion itself is the ‘Better Shelter’, winner of the Design Museum’s Design of the Year 2016, a structure that unpacks from two cardboard boxes, and can be assembled by four people with one hammer in just a few hours. Inside, visitors can see how refugees worldwide have customised the flatpack making it their own. Social design in action.
www.londondesignbiennale.com

London Design Biennale is at Somerset House, Strand, London WC2 from 4 to 23 September 2018. Book tickets online or opt for a guided tour.

Photos: Mark Cocksedge (Australia Pavilion); Ed Reeve

LDF 2017 – 5 FizzPicks for London Design Fair

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5 top tips for London Design Fair, which takes over East London's Old Truman Brewery this weekend...

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Hanging out at London Design Fair is pretty much our idea of the perfect Sunday. Spend your day perusing emerging and established design talent in and around East London's Old Truman Brewery, before chilling out at one of Brick Lane's bars, cafes or curry houses. One of our key pit stops for London Design Festival, this sprawling event hosts a huge selection of exhibitors, ticking the boxes from furniture to lighting and accessories.

So where to start? Always worth a look are the Country Pavilions, which offer group shows celebrating the best of national design from Sweden to Portugal, the Netherlands to Finland, Poland to South Korea, and beyond. You'll also discover special Features at the fair, from themed exhibits to material galleries and one-off collaborations. For a mix of inspiring designs, kick off with these five FizzPicks...


TOP: Design hunters can satisfy their curiosity at 2017's London Design Fair at Old Truman Brewery
ABOVE: Handmade with 100% cotton textiles, Mijo Studio's interactive 'Aio' seating encourages users to create different compositions

Mijo Studio (stand E23, Hall T1)
Devotees of bold pattern and colour, painterly prints and contemporary textiles will love the work of Mijo Studio. Based in Copenhagen, the Danish-Norwegian design duo – Miranda Tengs Brun and Josefine Gilbert – have brought their interactive 'Aio' seating to London Design Fair, which started life as a playful experiment into the relationship between patterns and shapes. Turn and flip the elements of this foam seat, with jaunty printed cotton upholstery, to create fresh compositions. Scandi chic.


ABOVE: Flyte's levitating products include the 'Flyte' light and 'Lyfe' planter, which both float in the air; A video showing the 'Flyte' light in action

Flyte (stand L05, Hall T3-C)
An innovation company specialising in home decor and lighting products, Swedish brand Flyte, founded by Simon Morris, launches a minimal light and vase flaunting magnetic magic! Both the 'Flyte' light bulb and the 'Lyfe' planter float in the air, levitating, 'setting the design free'. 'Flyte' draws power wirelessly from the base below while twirling around in mid-air, using induction rather than batteries. 'Lyfe' harnesses maglev ('magnetic levitation') technology, with a custom-shaped magnet pushing up against an electromagnetic base causing the planter to levitate in a zero-gravity growing system. See Flyte's site for more on how these magnetic fields work, or just enjoy the mystery!


ABOVE: Liga Studio's multifunctional 'Liga' series of storage boxes/occasional tables combines ombré pattern, fluoro colour and an unusual ligature detail for a hinge

Liga Studio (stand F33, Hall T1)
Storage gets sexy thanks to new French company Liga Studio, which has unveiled gorgeous ombré 'Liga' tables/storage units for London Design Fair. Run by creative duo Pierre Alexandre Cesbron (ENSCI) and Matthieu Muller (Design Academy Eindhoven), the brand's range of storage furniture includes a box, a bedside and a coffee table. It's the colour gradients that give these sleek contemporary designs star quality, as well as unusual details such as the ligature linking the top and bottom, acting as a hinge.


ABOVE: British Craft Pavilion's showcase includes ash and leather easy chairs by Will Elworthy Furniture; handmade porcelain vessels by Linda Bloomfield; wallpaper murals by Louise Body; stoneware platters by Kana London; and Tanya McCallin's finely thrown bowls in black stoneware and earthenware

British Craft Pavilion
Looking good this year is the British Craft Pavilion, an innovative selection of around 40 UK makers across diverse craft disciplines, curated by Hole & Corner magazine. Furniture, ceramics, textiles, wood, and work in lacquer, leather, metal, and concrete are among the diverse media explored in this striking show, where the handmade rules.


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ABOVE: Graphic lighting by Earnest Studio is a highlight on the USA: Guest Country stand

USA: Guest Country (Stand 10, Hall S3)
Curated by Sight Unseen, this inspiring assembly of 13 American-born or -based design practices includes minimal lighting by Earnest Studio, modernist-inspired furniture by California's Eric Trine, quirky sculptural lighting by Chicago's Steven Haulenbeek, and gorgeous, light-refracting glass objects by Seattle-based John Hogan. Don't miss Brooklyn/Seattle's Ladies & Gentlemen Studio, known for playful furniture, jewellery and lighting creations. Born in the USA...

londondesignfair.co.uk
London Design Fair is at Old Truman Brewery, Brick Lane, London E1 from 16 to 24 September 2017, including public days at the weekend. For visitor and ticket details click here.

LDF 2017 – Why designjunction should be in your diary this September

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Must-see show designjunction in the King's Cross Creative Quarter should be a definite date in your London Design Festival diary

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

One of our top picks for this year's London Design Festival, influential show designjunction (21-24 September 2017) offers a curated edit of up-and-coming and established design talent in north London's King's Cross Creative Quarter. Discover more than 200 exhibitors, including top global furniture, lighting and accessory brands, across five industrial spaces at key hub Granary Square, also home to pop-up shops and intriguing installations. Here's how to navigate #djKX's five show areas, plus a few tips for tipples afterwards!

ABOVE: At the core of 2017's designjunction, Granary Square's Gateways installation by Adam Nathaniel Furman celebrates Turkish tiles


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ABOVE: Flower power is the go at bloomon's floral walkway at Granary Square

Granary Square
At the heart of designjunction, Granary Square hosts the event's Box Office, housed in three glass pavilions by Remote Possibilities. Book or collect tickets here, or find out the skinny on the show. This central location is also home to flagship projects and installations. 

Your camera will thank you for starting at Gateways, by designer Adam Nathaniel Furman for Turkishceramics, which celebrates Turkey's love affair with artisanal tiles. Four tiled, four-metre-high gates – dubbed Classic, Timber, Retro and Metro – will immerse you in colour and pattern, proof of the enduring appeal of ceramics.


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ABOVE: Renault – Life Designed unveils new concept car TreZor

Cutting-edge car design is the star at bespoke interactive showcase Renault – Life Designed, which sees the French firm's award-bagging new concept car TreZor unveiled for the first time in the UK under the theme 'Beautiful Life', alongside a collaborative exhibition with Central Saint Martins MA industrial design students sharing ideas for the modular car of the future.

For pastel-hued flower power, check out bloomon's whimsical bloom-decked passage incorporating a secret door to a flower-filled room for intimate workshops and talks. Crafted by the floral delivery service – which sources stock direct from Dutch fields – it should inspire outdoor living ideas, as well as looking a treat on Instagram.


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Cubitt House & Cubitt Park
A stellar line-up of international design brands beckons at Granary Square's Cubitt House, displayed within a customised temporary structure, including furniture, lighting and accessories. Be sure to scope out Another Country, Bethan Gray and Deadgood. On the ground-floor you'll find popular show lightjunction, an illuminating mix of decorative lighting and emerging design labels. On the top floor, contract and residential brands present their latest products, especially interesting for trade and industry visitors. Cubitt Park is a new zone for 2017, combining emerging designers, luxury homewares and The Material Collective, a collaboration with SCIN gallery, investigating forward-looking materials.

ABOVE: Inspired by a mutual love of pattern, Kirkby Design x Eley Kishimoto recently presented 11 new wallcoverings to complement their upholstery fabrics, drawing on textural flocks, metallic prints and reflective surfaces. They've teamed up again in new area Cubitt Park to create VIP and press area The Lounge, host to several exhibitions and events


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The Canopy
Hot to shop? Temporary pop-up The Canopy in Granary Square brings together more than 70 desirable retail brands and emerging design labels under one striking wrought-iron structure, including homewares, stationery, tech goods, ceramics, glassware, textiles, architectural prints and fashion accessories. Look out for Fizz faves Adelaide furniture and product designers D.E (Daniel Emma), accessories brand &Ratio, and print duo Tom Pigeon.

ABOVE: designjunction's retail shopping zone The Canopy


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The Crossing
Expect installations by the likes of Kirkby Design, surface material maker Corian and OLED lighting specialists Blackbody at The Crossing, a five-storey zone which runs through Granary Building and the entry to Central Saint Martins, joining Cubitt House and The Canopy. This is also where you can spy new and graduate talent at the Rado Star Prize UK, launched for the first time and backed by the design-led Swiss watch brand.

ABOVE: French studios Blackbody and Haviland's bespoke contemporary chandelier cluster, 'Helen, Light & Porcelain', illuminates The Crossing area

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ABOVE FROM TOP: Lighting designer Tala will host a pop-up bar in Granary Square in a vintage car; Campari Creates takes to the water with a red-hued narrowboat bar

Creative cocktails
Worked up a thirst? Channel the spirit of Milan's Navigli canals at Campari Creates, a narrowboat bar dedicated to the iconic red aperitif. An art installation will accompany its two-week residency, alongside creative masterclasses. At Granary Square's Tala Mini Bar, high-end LED lighting bulb designer Tala will take over a refurbished vintage Mini Cooper as an impromptu bar, pouring white ports and tonics. The forest-inspired canopy, formed from 'Voronoi' bulbs, will look especially dazzling after a couple of cocktails...
thedesignjunction.co.uk

designjunction London 2017 is at 1 Granary Square, London N1, from Thursday 21 to Sunday 24 September 2017. For an advance ticket deal see our home page or click here for registration, opening hours and visitor information. Tickets are £12 in advance (free for trade), or £15 on the door.

6 FizzPicks for Sydney Contemporary 2017

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Sydney Contemporary brings the best local and international art galleries to town. See our guide to six must-sees...

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Get your art on at the third edition of Sydney Contemporary, an exciting showcase of 90 galleries representing more than 500 modern artists at Redfern's warehouse-chic Carriageworks. The four-day fair runs until this Sunday 10 September, including a mix of established and emerging talent (check out the Future section, for galleries going five years or less). Also up for grabs are installations, video, paper works, performance, a playfully interactive red room for children, and a programme of talks, tours and fringe events. There's tempting drinking and dining for refuelling, with tasty bites from Billy Kwong and Kitchen by Mike and pop-up bars by Glenfiddich and Petaluma.

Showcasing local galleries from Australia and New Zealand as well as global offerings spanning Singapore, Hong Kong, Berlin, Chile, Argentina, the USA and even Iran – look out for Tehran's Dastan's Basement (booth A03) with its hyper-detailed paintings – it's a huge gathering. So here our six of our favourites to get you inspired...

ABOVE: Robyn Stacey's mirrored camera obscura 'Double Take' installation, outside Sydney Contemporary art fair at Redfern's former railway yard Carriageworks

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May Space: Catherine O'Donnell
Combining incredibly detailed drawings of windows and doors with a graphic mural of a house, Catherine O'Donnell's 'Urban Perspective' installation at Sydney gallery May Space (booth A14) is startling. O'Donnell grew up in an estate building in Sydney's western suburbs, which informs her work. "My drawings are an exploration of the architecture , culture, and history of the urban environment with a current focus on 1960/70 housing estates," she says, homes she feels are overlooked, both aesthetically and in human terms. "I employ realism as a catalyst to ignite the imagination of the viewer and invite them to look beyond the mundane and banal."

ABOVE: Catherine O'Donnell's charcoal on paper 'Urban Perspective' (2017) at the May Space booth, inset in a charcoal wall drawing


Sabbia Gallery: Honor Freeman and Pippin Drysdale
Sydney's Sabbia Gallery (booth G08) specialises in Australian contemporary studio ceramics and glass, bringing high-end craft to the fair's art and design table. We loved Adelaide talent Honor Freeman's dazzling ceramic work 'Soap Score' (2016), containing a circle of 656 slip-cast porcelain pieces resembling shards of soap, reflecting the amount of soap an average human supposedly uses in their lifetime. The textures, shapes and faded pastel colours are beautiful, reflecting Freeman's long preoccupation with being an 'alchemist of domestic clutter'. Established Freemantle artist Pippin Drysdale's boulder-like series of porcelain works are also striking, incised with gorgeous coloured glazes, so fine they almost resemble glass.

ABOVE FROM LEFT: Honor Freeman's slip-cast porcelain 'Soap Score'; detail of its 656 components; Pippin Drysdale's seven-component porcelain 'Geikie Gorge I – Devil's Marbles III' (2017) in foreground, both Sabbia Gallery


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Martin Browne Contemporary: teamLab
Digital art gets the nod at Sydney gallery Martin Browne Contemporary (booth E10), which stars a large-scale, nine-channel digital work by Japan's teamLab. Entitled 'Continuous Life and Death at the Now of Eternity' (2017), it's a mesmerising nature-meets-tech spectacular of shifting colours, light and moods, with an algorithm creating an endless moving image of flowers being born, budding and blooming, then withering and dying. Rendered in real-time, not a pre-recorded loop, it takes its cue from the local sunrise and sunset, changing throughout the year, so it's never the same twice. "The picture at this moment can never be seen again," say its makers. Sneaky art hounds who charm their way into the fair's VIP lounge can see another stunning, six-channel teamLab digital creation – 'Four Seasons, a 1000 Years, Terraced Rice Fields – Tashibunosho' – in which computer-generated workers in rice fields respond to real-time weather, daylight and seasons in the Japanese region, ploughing in sunshine, sheltering from rain or dancing at night. While the original landscape has been largely unchanged for a century, the art work will be ever-changing, a new frontier for modern art. Look out for the collective's eight interactive Future Park installations at Sydney's Powerhouse Museum this summer.

ABOVE: Japanese collective teamLab's endless digital work 'Continuous Life and Death at the Now of Eternity' (2017) at Martin Browne Contemporary's stand


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Yavuz Gallery Projects: Lucas Grogan
You'll find colour inspiration aplenty at the fair, but Melbourne-based muralist Lucas Grogan's installation for Singapore's Yavuz Gallery Projects (booth A07) has the blue mother lode. Taking up major wall space, his trio of graphic ink works 'The Library' and single piece 'The Collection' all depict shelves of fictitious blue books with cheeky titles on the spines, mingled with the odd horse-head ornament, urn or bowl. As Grogan quipped on his Instagram, "If you spot a typo, keep it to your f••king self." Known for detailed, witty street art in trademark indigo blue, teamed with turquoise, navy and white, he's a colourist to watch.

ABOVE: Detail from multi-panel 'The Library' (2017) by Lucas Grogan, ink, acrylic and enamel on marine ply at Yavuz Gallery


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Arterial Gallery: Hayden Fowler
It's not often you see a performance art work involving a guy trapped in a cage with a dingo, but Hayden Fowler offers just that in 'Together again' for Arterial Gallery (booth G03), donning virtual reality goggles which trigger Australian landscape images, while a motion sensor worn by his companion Juno places the wild dog in the frame too. It's shades of Joseph Beuys' 1974 action with the coyote, but given a 21st-century new-tech spin, exploring the growing gap in our relationship with the natural world. Don't miss Fowler's second installation 'Australia' near the VIP Room, a colonial-style table loaded with white bones, linked to a tannoy, a challenging comment on Australia's painful treatment of its first people.

ABOVE: Hayden Fowler's plaster, polymer and sound 'Australia' (2017) installation for Arterial Gallery comments on the violence of colonialism


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107, Blak Mirror
Small but packing a mixed-media punch, local Redfern gallery 107 (booth C06) shares bold contemporary work by Aboriginal artists in its group show 'The Gilded Age', presented with Blak Mirror. Riffing on the glossy veneer covering today's pressing political and indigenous issues, it includes work by Jason Wing, Amala Groom, and Adam Hill (aka Blak Douglas) – who created the suspended gilded bat above – with traditional wooden shields by Chico Monks, inscribed with cartoonish phrases ('Oops', 'Bang', 'Sorry!'), sitting alongside Nicole Monks' 'Wabarn-Wabarn' chair, made from kangaroo leather draped in plush kangaroo pelts.

Finally, look out for 'Edition', a curated selection of design-art furniture near the entrance area, showcasing pieces by top brands Gufram, Established & Sons, BD Barcelona Design, and the limited-edition 'QTZ' chair by local talent Alexander Lotersztain for Derlot, curated by Sydney furniture label Living Edge. Who said art and design can't mix?

ABOVE: 107 gallery's group stand, including an amazing golden bat by Blak Douglas, bones and other mixed materials, foregrounding Aboriginal  perspectives

Sydney Contemporary is at Carriageworks, 245 Wilson Street, Redfern, Sydney until Sunday 10 September 2017; opening hours 10am-6pm Saturday, until 5pm Sunday. For ticket and visitor information click here.