RICHARD WOODS

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Richard Woods is the British artist and designer behind the big, cartoony, painted wood grain furniture for HAY and Established & Sons, and the forest-themed 'Tree Trunk' ceramics at Wrong for Hay. His latest installation, for the current Folkestone Triennial, consists of a series of six mini bungalows dotted around the landscape in unusual locations. Here he talks to DesignFizz about architecture, furniture and his love for wood.

BY CLAIRE BINGHAM

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Growing up, did you always have an affinity for making things?
Fishing was a big thing in my childhood. My dad was always preparing to go fishing and I remember being into making the fishing floats. They were shaped using sandpaper out of balsa wood and then painted on the top with bright colours. The bottoms were always painted with Rustins black satin paint.

What did you study?
I studied sculpture at Winchester School of Art and the Slade School of Fine Art in London. I have always been a ‘maker’ and hands-on. Looking back at what I made as a student, it was always large. It always involved lots of wood and lots of paint, so maybe nothing much has changed since then!

How would you describe your style?
I think my work is always a cartoon. This allows it to sit physically within the real world while appearing to be visually separate from it. The works are sometimes interactive (floors, furniture). Sometimes they are ‘don’t touch!’ (sculptures and paintings). Whether you can pick them up or they are just for looking at, I think they play equally with our notions of taste and class – and hopefully have a sense of humour.

ABOVE: The new 'Wrongwoods' collection for Established & Sons, 2017
BELOW: 'Tree Trunk' vases for Wrong for HAY, 2015

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ABOVE: 'Bench Press' seating for Established & Sons, 2009

What unites your projects?
After studying sculpture at the Slade, I worked as a carpenter and general builder for about seven years. That was during the early 90s and the whole world seemed to be laying laminate flooring (and I seemed to be laying most of it!). My work is a fusion of what I experienced at college and then the work I did to earn money when I left. I would laminate floors during the day and then found myself printing my own versions of wood patterns in the studio at night.

What materials intrigue you?
Wood.

What’s your art/design ethos?
I’m interested in the spaces where art, design and architecture meet. There used to be an unthinking mantra that art and design somehow needed to be separated out. This was enthusiastically adopted by commercial galleries because it’s a handy way of keeping art more expensive. It’s a dogma that’s been harmful to visual arts, so if I have an ethos of any type, it would be to keep these worlds close and not separate them.

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ABOVE: Woods' mini 'Holiday Home' bungalows are dotted around the coastal town of Folkestone for the fourth Folkestone Triennial, a wry comment on second home ownership and the UK's housing crisis

What inspired you to take part in the Folkestone Triennial?
I visited the site and became excited by an idea that I felt would resonate locally and nationally. (Click here to see our post on the Folkestone Triennial).

What do you reckon is the solution to holiday homes and their effect on villages?
Build more wooden houses that are heated with wood-burning stoves.

Any other recent projects?
I am making a new public artwork commissioned by Birmingham's Eastside Projects and Banbury Council. The work involves hundreds of replica houses, copied from a nearby housing estate. Our tiny model houses will be attached to a canopy of trees in a small wood near the estate. The idea was to give the houses the best back gardens that a house could ever possibly have.

ABOVE: New designs created with Sebastian Wrong for Established & Sons' 'Wrongwoods' collection include the vibrant 'Palm Springs' dining table (top), in a sunny five-colour palette inspired by the Californian city, and a low level monochrome/grey sideboard and dining table

What’s next?
We have been working on some new tables with UK designer Sebastian Wrong. Our collaboration, which has been developing for 10 years now, is called ‘Wrongwoods’. Previewed at 2017's recent London Design Festival, they're the first new products we've made with Established & Sons for five years, so it will be really interesting to see what the world makes of them.

What’s currently exciting you in design or style?
dRMM's wooden pier in Hastings is great. It’s a beautiful big open space – good for running around. I love that they’ve managed to avoid all the usual, miserable retail opportunities and it makes you aware of the fantastic expanse of open sea.

Where or how do you find inspiration?
Walking in woods or listening to live music. We live near Epping Forest, so I can get out and hug a tree pretty regularly, and I try to see some live music at least every couple of weeks. It’s one of the luxuries of living in London. Last week we were lucky enough to catch Deerhoof, which was truly inspirational.

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Who are your design heroes?
This week it's artist Franz West and architect Kazumasa Yamashita. I'm also inspired by musicians Jonathan Richman and Richard Dawson.

Where’s on your travel wish list?
Anywhere with a big forest. There's a plan to take my kids over to Scandinavia pretty soon. I think we’ll find some big forests there.

ABOVE: The iconic 'Face House' in Kyoto by Japanese architect Kazumasa Yamashita

What’s your social media of choice?
Instagram. I’m more keen on pictures than words. 
richardwoodsstudio.com

The Folkestone Triennial is on now until 5 November 2017. The new 'Wrongwoods' collection is available to order from selected stores. Visit establishedandsons.com for local stockists

Pictures: Peer Lindgreen, Thierry Bal

KELVIN HO Akin Creative

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Award-winning Sydney architect and designer Kelvin Ho made his name with minimal yet striking interiors for some of Australia's best fashion stores, including Belinda, Bassike, Dion Lee, Incu, sass & bide and Willow. He's also a regular collaborator with Sydney bar/restaurant innovators Merivale, working on hit recent venues Coogee Pavilion and The Paddington with more irons in the fire. 

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Akin Creative has worked on fashion stores, bars and restaurants, and residential spaces. Do you wear different hats for these projects or do they all draw on the same aesthetic?
Working on such a wide range of projects lets us constantly test new ideas and designs. I wear a different hat for each Akin Creative project as the structure of each commission is quite varied and I feel we create better solutions when each project is treated as unique.

How do you describe your design philosophy?
I would describe my philosophy as a cross between A Tribe Called Quest, Bob Dylan and Chet Baker

ABOVE RIGHT: Sydney architect/designer Kelvin Ho of Akin Creative; Ho working on minimal sets for the Australian Ballet
BELOW: Beachy timbers, bespoke details and geometric tiles at Manly Wharf restaurant Papi Chulo in Sydney, which embraces the outdoors

Your interiors for Merivale’s Sydney restaurants and bars have been inspiring. What are your favourite projects with them?
Each Merivale project is special in its own right, but my top three would be the Coogee Pavilion and Coogee Pavilion Rooftop at Coogee Beach for its sheer size and the impact it had on the community; Papi Chulo in Manly because we were able to design some amazing bespoke elements; and Ms.G’s in Potts Point, which was my first and one of the most fun.

What’s it like collaborating with their team?
It’s a true collaboration with Merivale as a client. Chief creatives Justin and his sister Bettina Hemmes are heavily involved in each decision. We spend a few days each week together working through the designs, which makes it a really organic process.

ABOVE FROM TOP: Buzzy four-storey mod-Asian restaurant Ms.G's in Potts Point teams neon with street art; beachfront Coogee Pavilion's airy industrial-chic interiors and grand scale have transformed the Coogee scene, with a family-friendly ground-floor and rooftop cocktails
BELOW FROM LEFT: Style collaborators Amanda Talbot, Merivale's Bettina and Justin Hemmes, and Akin Creative's Emilie Delalande and Kelvin Ho have worked on a bunch of Merivale hot spots, with more to come

Tell us about your recent Merivale project The Paddington. And the style directions for upcoming launches The Newport and Queen Chow?
The Paddington, on Paddington’s Oxford Street, brings together a bar, restaurant and pub under one roof. It was inspired by a classic butchery complete with cool rooms. Typical to Merivale venues, the journey through The Paddington is tactile and connected to the food and produce on offer. The kitchen is a focal point with three rotisseries and double-height custom copper range hoods. Without giving too much away, The Newport (in the Northern Beaches) and Queen Chow (the former Queen Victoria Hotel in Sydney's inner-west Enmore) are very different projects. The Newport is all about sunshine and the outdoors whereas Queen Chow is more urban and moody.

What’s next for you work wise?
We have lots of hospitality and retail projects in the pipeline. All the projects and clients we work with are amazing. We recently finished a new Maldives resort, on Baa Atoll, called Amilla Fushi.

Where do you get inspiration?
My inspiration is pretty broad – anything from nature, music, art, cinema or philosophy can be an influence. Generally, a really small detail that catches my eye can be a big inspiration.

ABOVE: Industrial goes coastal: Akin Creative's sleek interiors for new surfwear store Saturdays NYC in Bondi

What’s currently exciting you in design or style?
The ballet. I recently worked with the Australian Ballet on set design for a new production 'Filigree & Shadow', part of three-piece '20:21’. Being able to collaborate with such an artistic company was incredible – working with dancers was a really different way of designing for me. 

ABOVE: Akin Creative's sculptural set designs for the Australian Ballet's '20:21' dance performance

Who are your design heroes?
Italian designer Gio Ponti, American artist Donald Judd and Brazilian architect Lina Bo Bardi

Is Sydney a big influence on you? And where’s on your travel wish list?
Yes, I was born in Sydney so I know it really well. It’s a big influence as it balances the intensity of the city with the laid-back culture of the beaches and harbour. My travel wish list is generally anywhere with good bars or snow. Ideally both. 

What’s your social media of choice?
Instagram! Follow us at @akincreative.
akincreative.com

Kelvin Ho will join speakers Justin and Bettina Hemmes and stylist Amanda Talbot at 'Style Me Merivale', a design talk on Monday 7 March 2016 at Sydney's Ivy Ballroom (6.30pm until late). Hosted by Vogue Living's Editor-in-Chief Neale Whitaker as part of the 'March into Merivale' season, it will be an inspiring insight into the styling secrets of the Merivale team and its exciting upcoming restaurants and bars. Snap up tickets online for $45 each, including drinks on arrival. DesignFizz has a pair of tickets to give away; contact us here for a chance to win (subject Merivale, share your email).