In the pink at Normann Copenhagen

Normann Copenhagen's dramatic new Danish design showroom is soooo pretty in pink

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

2017's colour trend competition is already hotting up, with Pantone plumping for Greenery as their Color of the Year, and DesignFizz and other interiors experts predicting moody blues will reign. Danish design brand Normann Copenhagen shows there is a third way, picking wall-to-wall pink for their new Copenhagen showroom Gallery space. Following on from fashion trends, it's proof that pale, barely there nudes, beautiful blush hues, romantic rose, feisty fuchsia and hot pink can command attention, from monochrome-styled spaces to eye-catching furniture and accessories. 

ABOVE: Pink power rules in Normann Copenhagen's new Gallery space, below their flagship showroom in the Danish capital, taking over walls, floors and even the ceiling
ABOVE RIGHT: The brand's gorgeous 'Geo' storage jars by Nicholai Wiig Hansen include Blush hues
BELOW: Plush velvety pink-carpeted stairs lead down to the subterranean Gallery

Enter the recently revamped flagship showroom at Osterbrogade 70 and the ground-floor, set in an old cinema, is a vision of glamorous modernity, with a raw, industrial feel.  Oyster-grey walls meet a neutral palette of epoxy, brushed steel, terrazzo, reflective glass and glossy acrylic, with areas divided into a Hall, Stage and Ballroom. So far, so appealingly normal. In a twist worthy of Alice in Wonderland, though, a metal shaft leads from the middle of the showroom down into the lower Gallery space, and that's where the colour comes in. Cue 'pure pink pandemonium'.

ABOVE: A row of steel 'Cap' table lamps in Blush, by German duo KaschKasch, perch on pink plinths in the Gallery; Curated fashion items are displayed in a clear box; Tone-on-tone styling brings a blush to the cheeks of the 'Swell' armchair by Jonas Wagell

Plush pink carpet covers the stairs descending to the subterranean zone. A nude 'Swell' sofa stands in pride of place, surrounded by a pink harem of chairs and lights, perched on pink podiums and flanked by rosy columns. The effect is intended to be both beguilingly feminine and borderline disturbing, channeling the look and feel of a fleshy organism or bodily innards. A site-specific installation by Danish artist Nina Holmgren, entitled 'Fresh fools in a pool of pink salty tears' and including aquatic sounds and story fragments, adds more pink attitude, along with her curated playlists.

'We wanted to give visitors the feeling they're moving around in an art installation,' says Danish designer Hans Hornemann, who developed the concept of the new showroom alongside brand manager Britt Bonnesen. 'We've played with the contrast between warm and cold in a contemporary interior environment.' The Gallery aims to offer an experimental, artistic universe, that will host changing, transformative concepts.

ABOVE: Pink shopping opportunities at Normann Copenhagen include the 'Flip' mirror in Blush, extra large 'Nyhavn' vase in Plum, 'Nic Nac Organiser 2' container in Light Pink, 'Geo' vacuum jug in White, and small 'Circus' pouf in Blush velour
BELOW: Stairway from the pink Gallery back up to the neutral-hued main showroom, including pink floors and ceiling

Normann Copenhagen's showroom makeover was unveiled in late 2016, and will continue to evolve, with new looks coming to the Gallery. If you're passionate about on-trend pink you can shop the look, with a bunch of pink-hued products available from the creative Danish brand, including kitchen kit, desk storage, mirrors and poufs. And if wall-to-wall pink feels like overkill in your home, aim for a painted feature wall and accent details instead. 'With the right nuances and styling, pink can be very exclusive, classic and sophisticated,' says Bonnesen. 
normann-copenhagen.com

Normann Copenhagen's showroom is at Osterbrogade 70, Copenhagen, Denmark or shop the range online

MPavilion 2016

Indian architect Bijoy Jain brings handmade bamboo architecture to Melbourne's latest MPavilion

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

Melbourne's MPavilion series of temporary pavilions is always inspiring, with 2016's offering by Indian architect Bijoy Jain of Studio Mumbai demonstrating that there is still a place for natural materials in the 21st century. Formed from seven kilometres of bamboo, 26 kilometres of rope and 50 tonnes of stone, the 16.8 metre square summer pavilion represents traditional craft. 'I want it to be a symbol of the elemental nature of communal structures,' says Jain, 'A space to discover the essentials of the world and of one's self.'

ABOVE AND TOP: 2016's MPavilion in Melbourne is formed from sleek bamboo, rope and stone, with an adjacent entrance tower

Launched this October by the Naomi Milgrom Foundation, the pavilion is in Queen Victoria Gardens opposite NGV International. Check out the space while enjoying coffee by Three Thousand Thieves (daily, 9am–4pm), or take part in the free four-month programme of events, which spans design and architecture workshops and talks, live music and DJs, yoga and installations, films and fashion shows, kids' activities, dog walks and even a zombie dance class.

ABOVE FROM TOP: An opening in the square pavilion roof connects earth and sky; below it a golden well celebrates water within the paved, airy interior

In contrast to the contemporary, high-tech visions of the previous two annual pavilions – by Sean Godsell and Amanda Levete of AL_A – Studio Mumbai's calming, low-fi structure is part of an international movement championing handmade, human-centred architecture. Jain believes in 'lore', a body of traditional knowledge passed on by word of mouth. At Studio Mumbai this translates into working collaboratively with local artisans and craftspeople to design and build projects though an explorative, creative process. The result harnesses generations-old skills, building techniques and materials, and the ingenuity that arises from working with limited resources. The studio also aims to reflect each location, here the natural park setting, producing architecture 'that contains the life of its environment.'

ABOVE: Models and sketches contributed to the design development

Set on a bluestone floor, sourced from Victoria's Port Fairy, MPavilion features an opening in the centre of its roof to connect earth to sky. Below it sits a golden well symbolising water's vital status. Bamboo poles from India are pegged with wooden pins and lashed together with rope. Slatted roof panels hail from the karvi plant, with sticks woven together by Indian craftspeople. Beside the pavilion a 12-metre-high 'tazia' entrance tower, used in Indian ceremonies, provides a dynamic welcome. Lighting by Ben Cobham of Bluebottle transforms the pavilion at twilight in sync with a soundscape by artists Geoff Nees and J David Franzke.

ABOVE: Naomi Milgrom commissioned Indian architect Bijoy Jain of Studio Mumbai to create 2016's MPavilion

Popular throughout Asia as a building material, bamboo is still widely used as scaffolding even in cutting-edge cities such as Hong Kong. Earlier on the Fizz we shared Vietnamese architect Vo Trong Nghia's 'Green Ladder' bamboo installation, still on show at Sydney's Sherman Contemporary Art Foundation, inspired by the eco-friendly potential of this 'green steel'. Ilse Crawford's 2016 'Viktigt' collection for IKEA also celebrated bamboo as a flexible, eco-chic material for furniture and homewares. 2016's MPavilion proves nature and architecture can walk hand in hand – the perfect match for summer...
mpavilion.org
MPavilion is at Queen Victoria Gardens, Melbourne until 18 February 2017

Pictures: John Gollings; models and sketches, Studio Mumbai

Frette x Dimorestudio

London's Mayfair has just had an injection of modern Italian style at the new Frette store in South Audley Street. The Fizz says molto bene!

BY DEE IVA

Emiliano Salci and Britt Moran of Milanese design studio Dimorestudio have brought the glamour and sophistication of a sleek Italian palazzo to the new Frette store in London’s Mayfair.

Opulent materials such as Marquina marble, emerald green glass and brushed brass create a stylish space to showcase Frette’s new Autumn Winter collections of luxury bed, bath and table linens, and nightwear. We’re particularly loving the beautiful duck egg blue walls, the colour-zoned floors and the elegant illuminated stairwell which features black glazed metal set on opal white glass. If you feel the need to take a pew, classic designs including Gerrit Rietveld's 'Utrecht' armchair and Charlotte Perriand's 'LC7' chair for Cassina are dotted around too. 

ABOVE: Glossy dark blue cabinets with brushed brass handles, full height sliding panels and clever lighting are just some of the luxe details in Frette's new London showroom
BELOW: Black marble and polished concrete is used to great effect. We love the change of colour in the floors to mark out different zones 

ABOVE: Incorporating emerald green and opal white glass, black metal, concrete and steel, the illuminated stairwell is a masterful mix of materials 

To mark the opening of the new Mayfair boutique, Brit designer Ashley Hicks has collaborated with Frette on a new range of embroidered geometric bed linen that will be exclusive to the store and available online in the UK. If you’re in the market for something more bespoke, head down to the lower ground floor where you can add your own touches to any item from Frette’s collections. 

Dimorestudio has pulled out all the design stops here, so much so that we just want to bed down and snuggle up for the night. Zzz...
frette.com  dimorestudio.eu

citizenM Tower of London

citizenM refines the concept of the boutique hotel with its latest bastion of style in Tower Hill, London. Let's groove tonight...

BY DEE IVA

The imminent relocation of the Design Museum from Shad Thames to leafy Kensington has rung alarm bells at the Fizz. For 27 years it was East London's temple of modern design, in stark contrast to its historic dockyard surroundings and the grandeur of the Tower of London. When its doors closed on 30 June we thought that part of London might be crossed off the design trail for good.

Now a new design hotspot has opened a stone's throw from the old Design Museum site. Dutch hotel brand citizenM has taken up residence in Tower Hill, bringing its signature mix of design showroom/chillax zone to East London with the launch of citizenM Tower of London. The hipster vibe of its sister hotel, citizenM Bankside, has travelled well to the other side of the Thames but has been tweaked with a dash of BritPop street style. 

ABOVE: The Living Room mixes iconic British emblems with sleek leather banquettes and dark shelving
ABOVE RIGHT: The neo Brutalist glass and limestone exterior of citizenM Tower Hill
BELOW: Double height windows look out on to some of London's most iconic buildings

ABOVE: Post-punk images of the Queen reflect the wry British sense of humour

The hotel's Brutalist exterior gives no clue as to what lies inside. Echoes of Sex Pistols' designer Jamie Reid are present in graphic illustrations of the Queen which adorn the walls of the communal areas, while cushions bearing Union Jacks, Welsh dragons and the Scottish flag sit proudly in the Living Room. In the post-Brexit climate this could easily be mistaken for nationalist pomp and circumstance, but in the hands of citizenM's Amsterdam-based design team Concrete it's nothing of the kind as these recognisable elements of British design are mixed with vibrant coloured 'Cone' chairs by Verner Panton for Vitra and George Nelson's classic 'Bubble' lamps. Julian Opie's distinctive line artworks featuring his signature flat colours and black outlines will also be familiar to BritPop fans (Opie created the album artwork of 'Blur: The Best Of' in 2000).

BELOW: Verner Panton chairs and George Nelson lights bring a touch of retro-classicism to citizenM; Julian Opie's paintings may not be for sale but you can snap up contemporary pieces from collectionM, a curated collection of accessories, books, and art and design objects; Communal tables, iMacs and printers are available if you need to be in work mode

Foodies are well catered for with coffeeM, where you can down a macchiato and a pastry on your way in or out of the hotel, and canteenM, a round-the-clock open kitchen which serves tasty treats from carrot cakes to curries and a wide selection of cocktails. Lovers of the London skyline should head straight to cloudM, the double-height rooftop bar which offers spectacular views of the Tower of London, The Shard, The Gherkin and the controversial 'Walkie-Talkie'.

BELOW: canteenM serves a wide selection of hot food and cool cocktails around the clock

Thankfully, the 370 bedrooms at citizenM are tranquil sanctuaries, away from the visual razzmatazz of the public areas. Extra large beds, rainshowers and lush toiletries designed by Commes des Garçons, Viktor&Rolf and Helmut Lang are installed in all rooms and mood tablets allow you to control the lighting, blinds and room temperature from under your duvet. Seriously, if this isn't the coolest hotel in old London town we don't know what is. And with a new 216-room sister hotel just launched in Shoreditch, we reckon we'll all be applying for citizenship...
citizenm.com

Serpentine Pavilion 2016

London's 2016 Serpentine Pavilion unzipped! A triumph of materials and form, Bjarke Ingels' intriguing design is accompanied by four startling Summer Houses

BY SOPHIE DAVIES

It wouldn't be summer in London without the annual unveiling of the Serpentine Pavilion, bringing cutting-edge modern architecture to Kensington Gardens beside the Serpentine Gallery. 2016's Serpentine Architecture Programme sees Denmark's Bjarke Ingels take centre stage with a jaw-dropping pavilion inspired by an 'unzipped wall'. Whereas 2015's pavilion by Spain's SelgasCano was all about psychedelic colour, Ingels' creation explores poetic material form.

Design fans can also explore four accompanying Summer Houses by international talents – Asif Khan, Kunlé Adeyemi, Barkow Leibinger and Yona Friedman – as part of an expanded offering for the 16th edition, on show until 9 October 2016. All riff on Queen Caroline's Temple, a classical 1734 summer house by William Kent a skip from the gallery. What's more, each temporary structure showcases an architect who has never built in the UK before.

ABOVE: Serpentine Pavilion 2016 by Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG)
ABOVE RIGHT: Danish architect Bjarke Ingels in front of his pavilion
BELOW: An 'unzipped wall', Ingels' pavilion is formed from stacked, sculptural fibreglass frames with an inviting chamber within 

SERPENTINE PAVILION
Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG)

Transforming a straight line into a three-dimensional space, Copenhagen/New York-based Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG)'s Serpentine Pavilion takes its cue from an 'unzipped wall'. The cavity within becomes a dramatic space for a daytime cafe, events and the Park Nights cultural programme, while the elegant spire above acts as a cathedral-like beacon. It's simultaneously cubic and curvy, chunky and translucent, geometric and ethereal, or as Ingels puts it: 'A structure that is freeform yet rigorous, modular yet sculptural, both transparent and opaque, both solid box and blob.'

Borrowing its structure from a basic brick wall, it is formed from fibreglass frames rather than clay bricks or stone blocks, with the wall then pulled apart to reveal the cave-like interior. 'This unzipping of the wall turns the line into a surface, transforming the wall into a space,' says Ingels. The effect is part valley, part hillside, setting up seductive repetitions and undulations via waves of component blocks, harnessing graphic light and shade. Inspiring recent projects by BIG include 2 World Trade Center in New York and the Danish National Maritime Museum.
 

SERPENTINE SUMMER HOUSES

Asif Khan
Up-and-coming London architect Asif Khan discovered that the original Queen Caroline's Temple was positioned to catch the sunlight from the nearby Serpentine Lake, as well as the rising sun on the queen's birthday, and aims to recapture that combination in his delicate Serpentine Summer House. A sinuous circle of white timber staves, its circumference has been unpeeled, allowing changing views of the temple. A polished mirrored platform and roof inside amplify the experience. Khan's past work includes the colourful Coca-Cola Beatbox Pavilion at the London Olympics and Littlehampton's contemporary West Beach Cafe.


Kunlé Adeyemi
Kunlé Adeyemi (head of Amsterdam/Lagos practice NLÉ) offers an inverse, rotated replica of Queen Caroline's Temple for his Serpentine Summer House, turning its robust form into a reimagined sculptural installation. Shelter and relaxation is still the name of the game, with rough, prefabricated sandstone building blocks forming a room, doorway and window for visitors to interact with the space and each other. While the sandstone is similar to the temple's materials, the interior surfaces are softer. Adeyemi's combination of carved-out void, homely interior and fragmented furniture blocks offers a deconstructed, playful temple for the 21st century. If you love it check out his prototype Makoko Floating School designed for a Lagos lagoon.


Barkow Leibinger
Barkow Leibinger (Berlin/New York) took inspiration from another, extinct 18th-century pavilion by William Kent, on a man-made hill near the gallery, which rotated and offered 360-degree views of the park. At some point it disappeared, until this 2016 Summer House in-the-round paid homage to the original. Open to its surroundings, it looks like a ribbon, thanks to its undulating structural band of plywood on a steel frame. Loopy but lovely, it's somewhere to see and be seen.


Yona Friedman
A squiggly modular design that can be arranged in different formations, Parisian veteran Yona Friedman's Summer House picks up on his pioneering late 1950s project La Ville Spatiale (Spatial City). A space-chain structure, representing a fragment of a larger grid, it explores mobile architecture using elevated space to save on land footprint (vital for growing cities). It also encourages customisable spaces, allowing residents to define their own modular homes – a future-forward vision by this 93-year-old visionary.

BELOW: The original, classical Queen Caroline's Temple by William Kent, inspiration for all four summer houses

www.serpentinegalleries.org
The Serpentine Pavilion is open daily (free entry), 10am-6pm, until 9 October 2016 at the Serpentine Gallery, Kensington Gardens, Hyde Park, London W2 (closed 6 July until 1pm 7 July). Event programme Park Nights runs until 23 September 2016. 

Photos by Iwan Baan; Queen Caroline's Temple photo by Garry Knight