Behind the scenes at Diptyque

We go behind the scenes at Diptyque, famous for its elegant scented candles, as the French label celebrates the 50th anniversary of its first fragrance

BY AMY BRADFORD

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In 2018, Diptyque celebrates the 50th anniversary of its debut fragrance, the ground-breaking 'L'Eau', launched in 1968. The first unisex scent, inspired by its heady revolutionary era, it drew on a Renaissance recipe of spices, clove and cinnamon. To mark the occasion, the French luxury label has launched two new perfumes: 'Fleur de Peau' (a seductive floral featuring iris, musk and ambrette seeds) and 'Tempo' (a woody mix of patchouli and violet leaf), nods both to the Sixties and that original feisty fragrance. What better time to go behind the scenes at this much-loved perfume and home fragrance brand, respected as much for its iconic designs as its artfully crafted scents?

Diptyque’s jumbo-sized scented candles, packaged in ceramic holders, are probably the most covetable of all its many products. An investment buy at €230 (or £200 in the UK), they weigh a hefty 1.5kg and burn for up to 150 hours. Recently, Diptyque has updated the colours of these candles to make them even more beautiful, with ‘Tubéreuse’ available in a glossy plum-coloured vessel and ‘Figuier’ in a vivid green. There’s also a new large version of the brand’s best-selling ‘34’ fragrance in matt and glossy white.

TOP: Diptyque's two new scents for 2018, 'Fleur de Peau' and 'Tempo', channelling the swinging Sixties; £115 for 75ml. ABOVE RIGHT: This year is the 50th anniversary of the brand's first fragrance, the genderless 'L'Eau', adorned with a signature illustrated label.

As with everything at Diptyque, the story behind the product is as interesting as the end result. We were lucky enough to travel to the South of France to see the ceramic candle vessels being made, at the factory of Virebent, a pottery that has been making porcelain and stoneware since 1924. Set in the picturesque Lot valley, on the outskirts of the historic town of Puy-l’Evêque, Virebent started off making industrial ceramics, but branched out into decorative pottery in the 1960s (it now makes porcelain lighting and tableware for cult French brand Tsé & Tsé Associées, among others; if you’re in Puy-l’Evêque, be sure to visit its excellent factory shop).

ABOVE: Diptyque recently updated the colours of its large scented candles, adding plum-hued 'Tubéreuse' and white '34 Boulevard Saint Germain' to the range. BELOW: Outsize scented candle 'Figuier' now comes in gorgeous green, or opt for investment buy 'Baies' in black. All are suitable for indoors or outside.

At the Virebent workshop, a small band of dedicated artisans lovingly craft the candle vessels by hand, pouring liquid stoneware into moulds and then leaving them to air dry once they have set (this process takes at least two days, even in warm, dry weather). After that, the vessels are spray-enamelled and taken off to the kiln to bake – any that don’t emerge with a perfectly rich, even depth of colour in their glaze are ground down and recycled as sand (Diptyque inspectors approve or reject every single one). As for the scented wax? That is poured at another factory altogether, which means each giant candle has been on its own long journey before it makes its way to the shop floor and, in turn, to you. If you buy one of these candles, you’re investing in not just one kind of French craftsmanship, but several. Why not splash out? Perhaps for your own special anniversary...
diptyqueparis.fr  diptyqueparis.co.uk  virebent.com  tse-tse.com

BELOW: A video celebrating the 50th anniversary of the brand's first perfume. We also liked these Diptyque Facebook videos sharing the artwork behind 2018 scents 'Fleur de Peau' (illustrated by Dimitri Rybaltchenko) and 'Tempo(illustrated by Safia Ouares); click fragrance names to see the films

From East to West with Stellar Works

Stellar Works' desire to pull together global talents from four continents has resulted in a hybrid aesthetic of modern East/West design

BY DEE IVA

We never really got into fusion food, that fad for mixing eastern and western cuisines to produce something that didn’t do either any justice. It's an even harder trick to pull off with furniture so we’re very impressed with Shanghai-based Stellar Works and its approach to multicultural design.

Founded by Yuichiro Hori and launched internationally in 2011, Stellar Works' modus operandi is to harness the simplicity of Japanese and Scandinavian design and layer European luxury and playfulness with Chinese ornamentation to create a new global design aesthetic which references the past but is also entirely modern. To bring this vision to life, a clutch of international designers are on board to produce distinctive collections of furniture, lighting and accessories.

ABOVE: 'QT Chair' by Nic Graham, from £960. Powder-coated steel frame with wooden armrests. Available in diverse furnishing fabrics
ABOVE RIGHT: Founder Yuichiro Hori
BELOW: 'Cabinet of Curiosity' by Neri&Hu, £3,300. Solid walnut, brass-plated stainless steel, mesh panels and tempered glass. Set on a wheeled metal trolley, it's one of Stellar Works' most intriguing pieces, inspired by ceramic factory carts

Award-winning Shanghai design duo Neri&Hu mixes brass, leather and rich woods in their contemporary oriental collections for Stellar Works. The quietly industrial 'Utility' range, 'Chambre' bed and 'Cabinet of Curiosity' exude 21st-century Shanghai glamour. Creative directors for Stellar Works, they also present the company's visual aesthetic around the world.

ABOVE: The 'Chambre Bed', £1,485; 'Utility Sofa Three Sides', £2,830 and 'Utility Armchair U', from £575; 'Dowry Cabinet 1', £2,195. All by Neri&Hu
BELOW LEFT: 'James Bar Cart', £2550, by Yabu Pushelberg


Other Fizz faves include Space Copenhagen's slender 'Rén' tables and chairs that fuse Danish Modernism with the craft techniques of China and Japan to create an understated, timeless feel. We also like the 'QT'/'Chillax' collections by Australian designer Nic Graham, whose witty take on mid-century modern style references Scandinavian pragmatism with a dose of laid-back Aussie spirit (Nic's studio g+a has created quirky interiors for Australia's QT Hotels). New York design firm Yabu Pushelberg's airy 'James Bar Cart' is on our lust list too. Part of the 'James' range of sculptural furniture inspired by the world of performance cars, its solid steel frame is offset by oversized wheels, sleek walnut veneers and a tactile wood handle.

BELOW: 'Rén Coffee Table', £370; 'Rén Lounge Chair Two Seater', from £1,150, by Space Copenhagen

ABOVE: The slender lines of the 'Rén Lounge Chair Two Seater', from £1,150; 'Rén Lounge Chair', from £610; 'Rén Dining Table', from £1,220. Plush leather seating and dark woods feature in this timeless collection by Space Copenhagen
BELOW: Nic Graham's playful 'QT Chair with Cupholder', from £1,000; 'Chillax Sofa', from £2,700, and 'Chillax Highback Chair', from £1,150

Incorporated in Hong Kong with factories in Shanghai and showrooms dotted around the globe, Stellar Works' mix-and-match method is proving to be a winner. Hiro's inclusive design policy also sends out the message that different cultures really can work together to usher in a bright new world. A United Nations of design? Now there's a thought...
stellarworks.com