Taxi Fabric

The Fizz goes for a ride in Mumbai and Delhi's incredible pattern-tastic taxis and rickshaws. All aboard!

BY DEE IVA

If you’ve caught a taxi in Mumbai or Delhi in the past year you might have noticed that the interiors have moved on from worn out plain leather, velveteen and traditional intricate illustrations. There’s now a whole new wave of Indian designers putting their stamp on India’s taxis, bringing a bright, fresh and contemporary vibe to your ride around town.

Based in Mumbai, Taxi Fabric was founded in 2015 by art director Sanket Avlani to form a platform for local designers to use symbols and stories from the city to create new designs for its fleet of taxis. Artful typography, Bollywood stars, Mumbai art deco architecture and heroic female figures are just some of the images that now adorn the interiors of both Mumbai and Delhi’s taxis. 

ABOVE: 'Bombay Deco' by Sarah Fotheringham and Maninder Singh of Safomasi is the result of a collaboration with Architectural Digest India and Taxi Fabric
ABOVE RIGHT: Taxi Fabric founder and curator Sanket Avlani

ABOVE FROM TOP: 'Pitter Patter' by Chithkala Ramesh references India's rainy season; Aniruddh Mehta's monochrome 'Auto Chaos' rickshaw designs; Under the influence of ultraviolet lighting with 'Nocturnal' by Aditi Dash

Each design is digitally printed on fabric and then applied to seating, doors and ceiling to create an immersive design experience. Whether you’re feeling the force of Chithkala Ramesh’s Indian monsoon,  or tripping out under Aditi Dash’s psychedelic UV installation, it’s one cab ride you won’t forget in a hurry. Unusually for a continent known for its searing colours, monochrome has also made its mark in striking geometric designs by Aniruddh Mehta, who used a mix of rhomboids, triangles, stripes and dots to create an optically stimulating architectural interior in one of Mumbai’s motorised rickshaws. To celebrate the fourth anniversary of Architectural Digest India, Mehta was one of four designers chosen by ADI to devise architecturally inspired interiors with Taxi Fabric.  

ABOVE FROM TOP: Inspirational female activists and freedom fighters are captured in 'Celebrating Women Leaders' by Kruttika Susarla; Taxi Fabric's first collection of textile designs for the home

Originally started as a Kickstarter campaign, Taxi Fabric is now branching out into textiles for the home, with colourful graphic fabrics suitable for upholstery and soft furnishings. Beautifully drawn, we're hoping to see them popping up around the globe in 2017. Keep your eyes peeled and watch this space…
taxifabric.org

Pictures: Architectural Digest India, Amey Kadam, Sanskar Sawant, Pulat Bhatnagar, Taxi Fabric

Creative CoOp

Promoting yourself isn't easy when you're a young designer with big ideas but strapped for cash. The Fizz meets Creative CoOp who are helping up-and-coming design and crafts talents make their mark...

BY DEE IVA

You can be an amazing designer with beautiful products that astound the eye or promise to enrich our lives, but in the 21st century you also need your work to be seen in the best possible light. In the age of social media the image is king and a great shot is a powerful marketing tool. Instagram, Facebook, Twitter et al are full of selfies and phone snaps, but there’s nothing like a professional picture to separate the wheat from the chaff. However, if you’re a start-up or in your first year of business a professional shoot can be beyond your means as the cost of a photographer, stylist, set builder and set is very expensive.

Step forward the London-based Creative CoOp, a philanthropic collective dedicated to providing young UK creative businesses with professionally shot, art directed and styled photographs for a nominal fee. The team consists of photographer Anders Gramer, stylist Melinda Ashton Turner and her husband, art director Grant Turner. Having worked for a raft of international magazines and retail brands, including The World Of Interiors, Homes and Gardens and ELLE Decoration, they decided to pool their respective talents and volunteer their services to help up-and-coming design talents get a foot on the ladder.

ABOVE RIGHT: A handcrafted leather bag by Ted Jefferis of TedWood gets the Creative CoOp treatment
BELOW: Textile designer Maxine Sutton's graphic lampshade and cushions; Minimal styling and Expressionist lighting bring drama to Young & Norgate's 'Animate' writing desk 

‘The idea came about during a conversation about the UK design industry and how there are so many talented up-and-coming designer-makers, crafts people and brands who struggle to be seen or heard above the noise of big established brands,’ says Ashton Turner. ‘We are talking about designers who in addition to their core training have to learn to market and publicise their products. Big brands have the financial means to employ or hire a team of people to take on these responsibilities. It was at this point we asked ourselves what we as a photographer, stylist and art director could do to level the playing field and help young, small brands be seen.’

Having worked together on numerous shoots over the years, she and Gramer decided to set up the Creative CoOp with her husband Grant to do exactly that. The CoOp was formed in 2013 and began to invite young brands to apply for their services.

ABOVE FROM LEFT: The Creative CoOp founders: Melinda Ashton Turner, Grant Turner, Anders Gramer

‘We had to be very clear about the criteria that applicants had to meet in order for us to work with them,’ says Ashton Turner. ‘In essence, the CoOp is aimed at brands and designer-makers who don’t have the financial means or support to create styled imagery or branding. We often have to ask in-depth questions about how a brand is structured to ensure we are offering our services to those who need us most.'

ABOVE: Simple and elegant bone china vessels by ceramicist Hannah MorrowDesinature's 'Lily' lampshade

For a flat fee of £200 those lucky enough to be selected receive a package that includes not only the photography, styling, design and art direction of the Creative CoOp but also studio hire, transport of products and props, set building, and materials like paint and wallpaper. The CoOp has a network of like-minded companies, such as Shoot Services and London Art Makers, which donate their services or materials for free in return for a credit and publicity on Creative CoOp’s social media channels. In addition, the final images are then given to Elizabeth Machin PR which compiles press releases ready to be sent out to members of the media.

The CoOp's first client was Margate-based textile designer Maxine Sutton who approached them after seeing a post on the Cockpit Arts blog. 'This is wonderful professional nurturing,' she says. 'Such a high level of expertise, providing this type of support at the start of your career or when relaunching, could make a real difference. The shoot was also a very enjoyable day – lovely people who are really good at what they do'. Sutton’s graphic textiles are now stocked by big retail brands including Liberty, Heal’s and Anthropologie and she has her own standalone store in UK coastal town Margate, itself a rising design hotspot.

BELOW: This overhead shot for British paper goods and homewares brand HAM brings the hand of the maker into focus

It’s an inspiring concept that makes a huge difference to emerging talents. Design graduates in particular can find it hard to make ends meet in their first few years in business, and marketing and publicity is something that many struggle with. What Creative CoOp offers would otherwise be out of reach for most young creatives as a day’s shoot can often amount to well over £1,000 before the first image has even been taken. Even more incredible is that none of the CoOp’s members make any money themselves from the business.

‘Individually we are lucky enough to make a living working in our respective fields for international publications and brands,’ says Ashton Turner. ‘We wanted to give back to the community we loved, so the simple answer was to volunteer our services.'

We think it's an admirable idea deserving of an award for services to the design industry. Ma'am, are you listening?
creativecoop.co.uk

Dungeness Ahoy!

The living room mixes British mid-century furniture such as this Guy Rogers sofa and armchairs with Mini Moderns designs

The living room mixes British mid-century furniture such as this Guy Rogers sofa and armchairs with Mini Moderns designs

How to channel the Dungeness spirit in a contemporary style? Step into the converted railway carriage beach house of Keith Stephenson and Mark Hampshire, the pattern-happy duo behind interiors brand Mini Moderns.

BY CLAIRE BINGHAM

Lighthouses, clapperboard cottages, sea cabbages and shingle shores... The raw beauty of Dungeness in Kent was the inspiration behind the Mini Moderns' 2014 ‘Hinterland’ range of wallpapers, fabrics and accessories, taking its cue from the evocative mood and hues of this slice of south-east English coastline. And a run-down railway carriage on the beach proved to be just the place to showcase its creators' colourful, quirkily retro collections.

A bolthole from the pair's live/work studio in south London, the lovingly converted carriage is the result of a fortuitous weekend in Rye, where day-trippers Keith and Mark first came across the unusual two-bed property for sale nearby. Late Victorian, it was put on the beach in the 1920s when the railway ceased to run. Drawn to the tremendous sense of calm and feeling of ‘otherness' that defines Dungeness, the designers were looking for a joint 'do-up' project and retreat. The original mismatched wood-clad interior has been revamped channelling a clean Scandinavian style, with warm woods and white paint making the compact space appear bigger and lighter. 

Bright, airy and simply furnished – the intimate dining area underneath the carriage's sky light

Bright, airy and simply furnished – the intimate dining area underneath the carriage's sky light

An IKEA 'Udden' kitchen is decorated with Mini Moderns kitchenalia and vintage finds. 'Because the entire house is wood clad,' says Keith, 'we went with stainless steel surfaces, which are reminiscent of a fishmonger’s preparation area'

An IKEA 'Udden' kitchen is decorated with Mini Moderns kitchenalia and vintage finds. 'Because the entire house is wood clad,' says Keith, 'we went with stainless steel surfaces, which are reminiscent of a fishmonger’s preparation area'

Keith (left) and Mark enjoy a cuppa care of their 'Whitby' mug

Keith (left) and Mark enjoy a cuppa care of their 'Whitby' mug

Embracing the expansive views, untameable landscape and poppies that flower in late spring, Mark and Keith let nature take centre stage. Their beach house rule is a blanket ban on internet and television. 'We don’t have WiFi. We don’t have TV. It is a total break,' says Mark. Keith adds: 'Dungeness is one of those places that feels very different. There is an amazing quality of light and you're in touch with the changing seasons. You have the sense of really getting away.'

Which means there is all the more time for socialising. Part of a busy creative scene, the area has always been a hub for fishermen and artists alike, and was once home to film director Derek Jarman. 'Dungeness is a place full of legends and myth and you very quickly become part of the storytelling thing,' says Mark. 'Everyone has a tale to tell.' And as stewards of the railway carriage, Keith and Mark's journey has just begun...
minimoderns.com

Pictures by Andrew Boyd andrewmboyd.com

Bedroom detail: An old garden sifter serves as a pretty nest for Kristian Vedel’s wooden bird and Dungeness keepsakes

Bedroom detail: An old garden sifter serves as a pretty nest for Kristian Vedel’s wooden bird and Dungeness keepsakes

Kitchen detail: The simple white, grey and wood palette allows injections of colour, pattern and fun, from Jonathan Adler animals to vintage glass and vinyl

Kitchen detail: The simple white, grey and wood palette allows injections of colour, pattern and fun, from Jonathan Adler animals to vintage glass and vinyl

Mark and Keith's 'MMG' floor lamp and 'Paisley Crescent' wallpaper deck out the study. A Swedish classic, the desk is part of the 'String Shelf 'by Nils Strinning

Mark and Keith's 'MMG' floor lamp and 'Paisley Crescent' wallpaper deck out the study. A Swedish classic, the desk is part of the 'String Shelf 'by Nils Strinning

The guest bedroom features the duo's signature 'Whitby' print wallpaper and cushions, plus brass masthead wall lights

The guest bedroom features the duo's signature 'Whitby' print wallpaper and cushions, plus brass masthead wall lights

In a funky geometric and G Plan scheme, the bedroom sports Mini Modern designs including the 'Backgammon' wallpaper, 'Zag' dhurrie and 'Pavilion' cushions

In a funky geometric and G Plan scheme, the bedroom sports Mini Modern designs including the 'Backgammon' wallpaper, 'Zag' dhurrie and 'Pavilion' cushions

ABOVE FROM LEFT:
'Cherries'
tea towel, £12
'Dungeness' wallpaper in Washed Denim, £50 per 52cm x 10m roll 
'Peggy' wallpaper in Mustard, £45 per 52cm x 10m roll 
Unbleached cotton tote, £5